Jul
7
comment backup privileged data on remote servers without root ssh
I just tried setting forced-commands-only and it accepts the key, but my ssh client (Windows - BitviseSSH) indicates the login failed. Is there a command that needs to be permitted for sftp only access?
Jul
7
comment backup privileged data on remote servers without root ssh
I found this which gives a bit more description (now that I know what to search for) and I think I understand: superuser.com/questions/430053/…
Jul
7
comment backup privileged data on remote servers without root ssh
Okay, in the sshfs scenario, it is only SFTP access that is required, not shell access, and commands are required, I suppose unless there are commands issued for SFTP. Is it enough then to specify "forced commands" but then not associate any commands with any keys?
Jul
7
asked backup privileged data on remote servers without root ssh
Jul
5
awarded  Commentator
Jul
5
comment Secure use of a passphrase in environment variable
This is Ubuntu 18.04. I have very little knowledge of cronjobs, so I had not intended on using anything but "plain" cron. I am however, open to suggestions on how to deal with my situation more effectively.
Jul
5
revised Secure use of a passphrase in environment variable
mentioned my use of Backblaze B2
Jul
5
revised Secure use of a passphrase in environment variable
mentioned my use of Backblaze B2
Jul
5
awarded  Student
Jul
5
asked Secure use of a passphrase in environment variable
Jul
5
comment server backup rsync pull or push or Duplicity
Yes, I had that thought myself. To backup a remote / though, you would need to ssh in as root, which is best done with a key, which can be a key pair dedicated to backup purposes (helpful for logging? I don't know...)
Jul
4
comment server backup rsync pull or push or Duplicity
No, I hadn't considered that, and I'm open to suggestions, I'll look into it!
Jul
4
asked server backup rsync pull or push or Duplicity
Jun
15
comment Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
Yes, quite helpful. Thanks.
Jun
15
comment Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
Thanks for the answer, that sort of sums up most of my options. I agree that chroot is almost certainly not the way to go. My main concern was to allow a user to fully manage their files and mail configuration, but with minimal effort on my part (a power user?). In my mail setup, I was hoping to store their mailbox and web data under their home directory so that everything is in one place. I still need to look at the impact of serving a web site from a home directory. I'm starting to get a better feel on what to search for now.
Jun
15
awarded  Editor
Jun
15
comment Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
With it reduced to more of a permissions problem instead of a chroot problem, I suspect I should have no troubles finding examples on setting permissions on a multi user system.
Jun
15
revised Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
added 5 characters in body
Jun
15
comment Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
Good idea, I'll do that.
Jun
15
comment Restrict a user to home directory without modifying /home/%u permissions
Dumb question, why allow execute for group and other? Why not remove permissions for group and other completely?