Apr
29
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
8
accepted Why is the output of “openssl passwd” different each time?
Apr
7
revised Why is the output of “openssl passwd” different each time?
Better explanation of question
Apr
7
asked Why is the output of “openssl passwd” different each time?
Mar
21
awarded  Quorum
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
7
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
comment Can only access one of the two Samba shared directories
Did you ever resolve this issue? I'm facing an issue that seems similar to yours.
Jan
4
accepted Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
Jan
3
comment Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
Good idea, thank you, but unfortunately, looks like Busybox version of tar does not support -u/-update.
Jan
3
comment Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
Not at all a stupid answer. The original question (and the reason why I asked if this was possible to do this from stdin) was because of the problem I noted RE: xargs calling tar multiple times if the input list is too long...does this solution also bypass that problem? (it seems like it does because it's also using "-T", not explicitly putting the source files as command-line arguments)
Jan
3
comment Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
@Kusalananda - that's an informative comment; thank you. However, it looks like pax isn't available in Busybox (at least in the version of Busybox I have to work with). I think I may have to resign myself to using the sub-optimal approach using xargs.
Jan
3
comment Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
@JdeBP - removed tertiary question
Jan
3
revised Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
Removed tertiary question
Jan
3
revised Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
Grammar
Jan
3
asked Portable way to invoke tar with a list of files from stdin
2018
Dec
20
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
24
accepted Obscure reasons a file is read-only?
Aug
24
comment Obscure reasons a file is read-only?
@Thegs - I think your suggestion dovetails into what Luciano answered below. When I ran df the output had the line "/dev/sda1 79637648 884536 74707684 1% /a". From there, I ran the mount command per Luciano's answer, and if I interpreted the output correctly it implied that the /a/ directory is mounted to a read-only filesystem, so effectively that entire directory tree is read-only...? (my understanding of the relationship between partitions and filesystems is very rudimentary, so sorry if my terminology is awkward)