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The mystery is solved! kglobalaccel5 made it far easier to research for this bug and indeed it has been reported on https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=306352. I looked in my home directory and indeed there was a .Xmodmap (last modified 4 years ago) lying around. I deleted it and after a reboot all devices are working fine again.


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I think your keyboard works, but the X application might not have the focus. Try this. In ~/.xinitrc add a line (create the file if it is not there) xterm & That tells startx to run that command on start. Try to type there. If it does not work and you have a mouse, click on the xterm window and type again. I f you don't have a mouse, try doing Alt-tab ...


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1) Because the original free X server became somewhat commercial at some stage, so a free variant XFree86 split off it, which then became X.org after some politics and drama. Wikipedia has a bit of history, but, like all contentious history, be careful of the bias of the writer(s). But all this was long long ago terms of computing. Anyhow, the binary name ...


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It's possible that some instance of Xorg might have crashed, leaving behind its lock file, /tmp/.X0-lock. Then, when a new instance is launched, it notices this lock file and goes on with another display number. On reboot the /tmp directory is cleared, so Xorg may start with display :0. I'm not sure why you're not at this new instance's VT though. You can ...


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Yup, it was related to debian #939839. As per the advice on debian #939401, I installed the Debian 390x legacy drivers: sudo apt install nvidia-legacy-390xx-driver And then reconfigured my GLX setup to use the Nvidia 390x drivers rather than the Nvidia 430 drivers: sudo update-glx --config nvidia And that fixed everything. Hopefully, eventually the 430 ...


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We had a problem building xpm-3.4k where the process could not find -lXt. We did the following on CentOS 7: yum install *Xt*. Prior to that we did yum install xorg*dev* to get the other X development builds. We tried to build from the X source, but that proved to be way too time consuming. So, it is great that the good people at CentOS have the ...


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As alternative to sux, to safely run graphical command (firefox-esr in example below) as $AUTHUSER (guest in example below): AUTHUSER=guest AUTHSTRING=SI:localuser:${AUTHUSER} xhost +${AUTHSTRING} > /dev/null SUDO_ASKPASS=/usr/bin/ssh-askpass export SUDO_ASKPASS sudo -k --askpass -u ${AUTHUSER} /usr/bin/firefox-esr xhost -${AUTHSTRING} > /dev/null ...


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Should I imagine it like a TCP/UDP port (per-machine rather than per-user)? It actually is a unix domain socket for local users, and a TCP port (if enabled, on modern X servers it's disabled by default). Can I connect to an other users DISPLAY? Yes, with proper authorization. See xauth and xhost. Can I list the currently used DISPLAY numbers for one ...


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Niklas's answer pointed me towards a solution if you are using arandr. You may find (like I did) that when you unplug the dock, arandr will only show the primary monitor (my laptop in this case). Your other two monitors are still detected by xrandr though, so you just need to re-activate the two other monitors by right-clicking the background of the GUI and ...


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If you are trying the xmodmap commands (on X, not Weyland) and you are getting the error BadValue (integer parameter out of range for operation) in X_SetPointerMapping, you may need to use xinput instead. Run xinput with no parameters to get the device IDs (look for one for the pointer) then run xinput set-button-map [pointer-device-id] 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 ...


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loginctl from systemd to the rescue: loginctl --no-legend list-sessions \ | cut -d ' ' -f 1 \ | while read sessionid; do \ [ $(loginctl --property Type --value show-session $sessionid) = 'x11' ] \ && loginctl --property Name --value show-session $sessionid; \ done Get the list of session IDs, see which one is of type x11 and print ...


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To answer your clarification: It depends. It's possible for a user to start an X server. However, most distros use a display manager (DM) to start the X server. This is a system service owned by root, which starts the X server as root, display a login screen, and then grant this particular user access to this display (e.g. :0) via xauth. As to "which ...


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