56

The setting you're looking for is listed under "Window manager tweaks". XFCE menu Settings Window Manager Tweaks Focus "When a window raises itself" "Do nothing" Note that you cannot get the behavior where it will show raised windows on other workspaces. You can have it show all windows on all workspaces, or the current workspace. There's no option for "...


42

You can define a binding in your i3 config. Note: windows are called "containers", and monitors are called "outputs". move workspace to output left|right|down|up|current|primary|<output> Here's what I use in my config: # move focused workspace between monitors bindsym $mod+Ctrl+greater move workspace to output right bindsym $mod+Ctrl+less move ...


29

You can't assign multiple outputs to single workspace, see: https://github.com/i3/i3/issues/555 So the only way is to change i3 config dynamically. You could assign to hotkey script that will be doing 2 things: changing monitor outputs with xrandr and moving workspaces with i3-msg: xrandr --output DP2 --auto --right-of eDP1 i3-msg "workspace 6, move ...


21

i3 does not really support key sequences like vim. Any key binding consists of a single key preceded by an optional list of distinct (so no Shift+Shift) modifiers. And all of the modifiers need to be pressed down at the time the main key is pressed. That being said, there are two main ways to have a lot of workspaces without having to bind them to long ...


16

Short answer: yes, you can do this. I have my (Fedora) desktop set up this way, each monitor is an independent display. It is the same 'desktop', in the X sense, but there are some limitations to typical desktop functionality with this setup versus the 'single desktop spread over two monitors' configuration. [For example, you can't drag a window from one ...


14

For windows and workspaces, you need to define a binding in your i3 config. Note: windows are called "containers", and monitors are called "outputs". For moving windows: move container to output left|right|down|up|current|primary|<output> This is what I use in my i3 config: # move focused window between monitors bindsym $mod+Shift+greater move ...


11

I think the animation of switch workspace is annoying.So, in Cinnamon 3.0.7, I backup /usr/share/cinnamon/js/ui/windowManager.js and edit const WINDOW_ANIMATION_TIME = 0.25; to const WINDOW_ANIMATION_TIME = 0; then restart cinnamon by Alt+F2, input r and Enter And you can set bigger number to make animation slower.


11

In hangouts, click the "hamburger" menu (or on your name) in the top left to go to the main options. In there (under "Hangouts App Settings") is a checkbox for "Always on Visible Workspace", uncheck it.


11

The workspace can be explicitly specified by name like this, for values of workspace_name and output_name: i3-msg '[workspace="workspace_name"]' move workspace to output output_index Note that if you name your workspaces like 1:first, you use 1 not first.


11

As you've found out, you can do this via tweak-tool: and indeed, the changes are now done in the dconf database so if you prefer doing it in terminal you need to toggle dynamic-workspaces to false and set the desired num-workspaces so either dconf write /org/gnome/mutter/dynamic-workspaces false dconf write /org/gnome/desktop/wm/preferences/num-workspaces ...


10

This is what you have to put in your ~/.i3/config file: For example you want Emacs always opened up in work-space 4. assign [class="Emacs"] 4 How do you get the class info? Run xprop and click on the window you want to capture. For example while Emacs is running, using another terminal execute xprop and then click on the Emacs window. In the output you ...


8

Perhaps you're getting confused with the -t # switch. The windows are numbered as starting with a 1 but the first window is actually number 0. Notice in the output of wmctrl -l: $ wmctrl -l 0x00c00028 -1 grinchy Top Expanded Edge Panel 0x0120001e 0 grinchy x-nautilus-desktop 0x06015fee 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ 0x06000004 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ ...


8

It is (somewhat) possible to emulate this "feature" (For me, the workspace behaviour of i3 is one of the main features, so I do not really recommend to do this unless you really cannot work without workspaces spanning all monitors while still wanting to use i3). You can bind multiple commands to shortcuts, so you just can switch workspaces on both ...


8

By default, they appear to both be assigned to “Switch applications”. They can be re-assigned using the keyboard preferences: Open the menu in the top-right-hand corner of your main screen. Click on the “Settings button”, i.e. the left-most button here: Choose “Devices” in the left-hand column: Choose “Keyboard”. This will lead you to a list of supported ...


7

There doesn't seem to much motivation to implement some EWMH support in Firefox nor in Chrome, even though this would get the restoration to workspace issue resolved with a large number of desktops. A bug has been open for Firefox since 2007 and one for Chrome since 2009. What you can do outside of Firefox and Chrome, if the active TABs in different browser ...


7

[I think this is most appropriate to list as a separate answer, 2.5 years later] It is possible to do this with the assistance of xbindkeys. Install (#apt-get install xbindkeys), and then add this to the bottom of ~/.xbindkeysrc: # Previous desktop "dbus-send --session --type=method_call --dest=org.Cinnamon /org/Cinnamon org.Cinnamon.switchWorkspaceLeft" ...


7

Yes, you can do it using the Workspace Grid extension. Do one of the following (reproduced from the Installation section): Download the .zip file on the Downloads page. Open gnome-tweak-tool, go to "Shell Extensions", "Install Extension" and select the .zip file. Or Visit https://extensions.gnome.org/extension/484/workspace-grid/ ...


6

Currently there is no extension that can provide this functionality. But there is one that could help you organize your workspaces if it is compatible with your version of the GNOME shell, "Workspace Grid": https://extensions.gnome.org/extension/484/workspace-grid/


6

Use this batch to open Geany. This will open a separate socket specific to each workspace. For example, in Thunar, use 'open with other application' and point to this batch file. #!/bin/sh socket=`xprop -root _NET_CURRENT_DESKTOP` socket=${socket##* } if [ "$socket" ] then if [ "$DISPLAY" ] then socket="${DISPLAY%.*}-$socket" ...


6

My solution to this is just using more keys: set $ws0 "0:`:www" set $ws1 "1:1" set $ws2 "2:2" set $ws3 "3:3:fm" set $ws4 "4:4" set $ws5 "5:5" set $ws6 "6:6:dev" set $ws7 "7:7" set $ws8 "8:8" set $ws9 "9:9" set $ws10 "10:0:music" set $ws11 "11:-:jd" set $ws12 "12:=:comm" set $ws13 "13:B" set $ws14 "14:H" set $ws15 "15:E" set $ws16 "16:I" set $ws17 "17:D:...


6

According to the user's guide, syntax: workspace 1 output eDP1 ... workspace 6 output HDMI2 VGA should work. Or you may define primary output on your machines, if not set (xrandr --output <output> --primary), and use this syntax: workspace 1 output primary ... workspace 6 output secondary


6

I just hit the same problem that my first screen (laptop) gets the second workspace and my external screen gets the third workspace. In my situation, the problem is caused by a previously generated xmonad.state file in ~/.xmonad/. Deleting that file solves the problem. The xmonad.state file is generated every time you press mod+q to restart xmonad during ...


5

OK, found a way via gsettings: $ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences workspace-names "['Com', 'Vienna', 'Test1', 'Test2','Test3']" $ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences num-workspaces "5"


5

I had this exact same problem. So I wrote a shell script that I bound to a hotkey. When I hit the hotkey, it gets the window id of the currently active window (the one that has focus). Then it gives you a popup dialog where you enter the title you want that window to have. Then every time that window changes its name, it changes it back to the title you ...


5

Despite the manual page telling you that you shouldn't use -class as it is used by the wrapper, there don't appear to be any side effects from adding this on the command line. This suggests that you can start mutt by uxterm -class Mutt -e mutt If this doesn't work then just copying the uxterm shell script and altering the class being set is another option.


4

It is now in System Settings => Window Tiling and Edge Flip which, really, should have been evident from the name:


4

Answer to a very old question if anyone still wondering: Yes, you can. Using a Gnome extension called Walkpaper. Install, open its preferences/options, assign wallpaper to each workspace and done.


4

Go to the terminal and type geany -h it will show you all the options availible. Among them -i, --new-instance Don't open files in a running instance, force opening a new instance is exactly what you need. HOW-TO Find that thing you are clicking. Open it in any text editor, or find a way of changing the command it is executing. (might be tricky if it'...


4

This is what i have done long time ago but it probably shouldn't be done like this, it is incredibly hacky and inefficient ! :P It basically makes a screenshot of the current screen and slide it to the side one pixel at a time. (speed depend on computers i guess.) I have a bash script goto_to_workspace.sh that is triggered every time i change workspace with ...


3

You could do that via a gnome-shell extension: workspace-switcher-popup-thumbnails Download the zip file and either use gnome-tweak-tool to install it or extract the archive and move the resulting directory to ~/.local/share/gnome-shell/extensions/gnome-shell-extension-workspace-switcher-popup-thumbnails@sustmidown.centrum.cz note the name of the ...


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