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38

vim can easily do that: ctrl+ws - Split windows ctrl+ww - switch between windows ctrl+wq - Quit a window ctrl+wv - Split windows vertically :sp filename will open filename in new buffer and split a window. You can also do vim -o file1 file2 To open the files in a split screen layout. Replace -o with -O for vertical split instead of horizontal.


31

In Fedora 24 (which uses Gnome) the key combination Super + Shift + ← or Super + Shift + → moves windows between monitors by default. If you play with Super + Cursor Keys and then use Super + Shift + Cursor Keys you should be able to move/minimise/maximise windows with ease.


29

Go into System Settings, then into "Window Tiling and Edge Flip" and check the box marked "Maximize, instead of tile, when dragging window to top edge". Tried it on my Linux Mint 16 installation and it worked flawlessly.


25

It is as simple as this: xdotool getactivewindow getwindowname Good luck hope it works for you!


19

Here is a community version of the answer by Yokai that incorporates examples offered by Rudolf Olah. You can use the tool called xdotool to control window size and location. Not only that, any script you write in bash, using xdotool, can be setup to work with a fully maximized window and it can be scripted to set the window size and x:y coordinates by ...


18

As far as I know, this is not possible as Firefox does not accept commands to control the window. That's also (mostly) the responsibility of the window manager, so I doubt that there ever will be parameters to do that. However, you can control the window with wmctrl, but that's going to be a little bit difficult: #!/bin/sh firefox -new-instance -new-window ...


17

You can use xdotool, a versatile X window automation tool. focused_window_id=$(xdotool getwindowfocus) active_window_id=$(xdotool getactivewindow) active_window_pid=$(xdotool getwindowpid "$active_window_id") (I don't know what the difference between focused and active is.) (I thought wmctrl could do this, but apparently not.)


15

I believe the related man page is, XKillClient. You can use xdotool to simulate the close button being clicked from a terminal like so. Example Assuming I have a gnome-terminal open and it's name is "saml@grinchy:/home". Get the window ID $ xdotool search --name "saml@grinchy:/home" 96488188 Send it a Alt+F4 $ xdotool windowactivate --sync 96488188 key ...


13

This can be done using Emacs. It works in GUI and in terminal mode. You can even split multiple times. Here are some basic key combinations: C-x 2 Split the selected window into two windows, one above the other (split-window-below). C-x 3 Split the selected window into two windows, positioned side by side (split-window-right). C-Mouse-2 ...


12

The first two examples will activate the first listed Firefox window, based on its Title. Firefox always ends its Title-bar with "Mozilla Firefox"... "listed" means: as listed by wmctrl querying X. The first example uses a fuzzy match for the title. wmctrl -a "Mozilla Firefox" Or, to get the title more specifically: wmctrl -Fa "$(wmctrl -l | sed -rn ...


12

First if you aren't sure of what you are doing, make a backup of your important data. Then you have to follow 3 steps : Open GParted and resize your linux partition(s) in order to have at least 20Gb of free space. Boot on the Windows installation DVD/USB and select "Unallocated space" to not override your linux partition(s). Finally you have to boot on a ...


11

With vim, you can use split or vsplit. The first one will split horizintally and the second one will split vertically. CTRLw then to navigate through split screens. You can also use tab. tabnew filename will open filename in a new tab. You can use tabnext and :tabprevious to navigate between tabs. I personnaly maps the left and right arrows to navigate ...


11

First Option: You can use overview to drag the windows between monitors. Second Option: You can set shortcuts for the keyboard to move it.


11

In hangouts, click the "hamburger" menu (or on your name) in the top left to go to the main options. In there (under "Hangouts App Settings") is a checkbox for "Always on Visible Workspace", uncheck it.


10

Minimizing a window might free a little memory, but it depends on the application, and it won't amount to much. In any case, minimizing won't make more difference than any other form of hiding. Even if an application's window is minimized, it's still running. The application isn't going to need to keep less data in memory just because one of its windows is ...


10

If I'm not mistaken, it's supposed to stick the window to the screen, making it visible on all workspaces.


9

Cygwin X Faq states that they use getdtablesize : Cygwin/X queries getdtablesize() for the maximum number of client connections allowed; by default Cygwin returns 32 from getdtablesize(). Cygwin/X Server Test Series release Test44, released on 2001-08-15, changed the maximum number of clients from 32 to 1024 by passing the square of getdtablesize()...


9

Wmctrl This is kind of related but you could change the text in the title bar of this mystery application using the command wmctrl. Example Say I ran the application gvim. It shows up as follows when I list the open windows. $ wmctrl -l 0x04402eed -1 grinchy N/A 0x00c00003 -1 grinchy Bottom Expanded Edge Panel 0x00c00028 -1 grinchy Top Expanded Edge ...


8

If you are the kind of guy who likes to partition your screen up into increments like full screen and half screen using keyboard shortcuts, you might consider using a different window manager entirely. I don't think there is any reason you have to stay with the whole Gnome/Metacity/Compiz scene. There are a plethora of Window Managers available for Linux ...


8

try this, it uses only xdotool, but its version is at least "2.20110530.1" xdotool getmouselocation --shell | grep WINDOW to get the window id directly you can use this: sedGetValue='s/.*=\(.*\)/\1/' windowId=`xdotool getmouselocation --shell 2>/dev/null |grep WINDOW |sed "$sedGetValue"` echo $windowId


8

Yes, this is very, very annoying. Meanwhile, this app should help: http://www.carsten-mielke.com/redquits.html From the description: Have you ever tried to close an application with its red button and wondered why it is still open? RedQuits changes this. All programs now quit and close all open windows if you click the red button.


8

Try open_with with the f or t flag: open_with [application] [flags] [mode] Open the selected files with the given application, unless it is omitted, in which case the default application is used. flags change the way the application is executed and are described in their own section in this man page. The mode is a number that specifies which ...


7

Simpler (IMO) than OP's solution (i.e. without ps, grep and awk), to get the process name : cat /proc/$(xdotool getwindowpid $(xdotool getwindowfocus))/comm Or if you want an end of line : echo $(cat /proc/$(xdotool getwindowpid $(xdotool getwindowfocus))/comm)


7

joe (Joe's Own Editor) can do this, too: ctrl+ko - split window horizontally ctrl+kp - switch to the previous window ctrl+kn - switch to the next window ctrl+ke - open new file in current window ctrl+kg - grow height of current window ctrl+kt - shrink height of current window ctrl+ki - hide all windows except the current one, press again to show all ...


7

Kate KDE Advanced Text Editor is very featureful. It has everything you described in the question and much more. See for yourself: To split the view, go to View → Split View. Then you can select one of these options: Split Vertical (Ctrl+Shift+L) Split Horizotal (Ctrl+Shift+T) Close Current View (Ctrl+Shift+R) To get the layout like on this ...


7

I don't have Lubuntu installed to test but maybe: To configuration file ~/.config/openbox/lubuntu-rc.xml adding the lines below : <!-- Option to maximize all normal window when launched--> <application type="normal"> <maximized>true</maximized> </application> Removal of this was suggested as a way to STOP it from doing so ...


7

First, we see some information from man sftp: DESCRIPTION sftp is an interactive file transfer program, similar to ftp(1), which performs all operations over an encrypted ssh(1) transport. It may also use many features of ssh, such as public key authentication and compres‐ sion. sftp connects and logs into the specified host, then ...


7

You probably have one of the *-askpass packages installed, and the environment variable SSH_ASKPASS set accordingly; see ssh(1). Unsetting the variable, e. g. in your ~/.bashrc, or uninstalling the package should do the trick. See also Tell SSH to use a graphical prompt for key passphrase for the reverse problem and some hints about the environment.


6

It might be simpler, and more reliable, to rely on your window manager or X11 to handle this by writing a "real" X11 application. What you want from the shell is something that registers with the window manager and waits for a desired event type before returning to the shell... it's much more load-friendly if you can avoid looping inside the shell. (Your ...


6

Most modern dekstops are EMWH compliant. You can use wmctrl to control those and the windows on them, e.g.: wmctrl -a <WIN> to activate a window by switching to its desktop and raising it (<WIN> can be various things, by default a string match on the window title, see the wmctrl man page).


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