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62

In more recent gnome versions (e.g., gnome-shell), you need to use this instead: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences resize-with-right-button true Gnome defaults to using the Super ("Windows") key for window actions, so the above alone will enable moving (super-leftdrag) and resizing (super-rightdrag). To use the Alt key instead of the Super key ...


60

According to the Arch Wiki i3 page, to autostart an application on a specific workspace, you use i3-msg: exec --no-startup-id i3-msg 'workspace 1:Web; exec /usr/bin/firefox'


54

From the bottom up: Xorg, XFree86 and X11 are display servers. This creates the graphical environment. [gkx]dm (and others) are display managers. A login manager is a synonym. This is the first X program run by the system if the system (not the user) is starting X and allows you to log on to the local system, or network systems. A window manager controls ...


38

No, you don't need to be running a window manager to allow an X client to work. Some systems provide an option to just run a terminal at startup, and from that you can start additional programs, including window managers. Some kiosk setups which only want one application to run don't need a window manager. Some implementations of X for microsoft windows ...


27

On Linux, with a window manager that follows the Extended Window Manager Hints (EWMH) you can do this by setting the above property. Linux Mint Cinnameon and Mate desktop environments both incorporate elements in the stack that handle the EWMH functionality. What you can do using the window title is use the following command: wmctrl -r :SELECT: -b add,...


26

It's very easy, you can use Alt + right-click + drag.


26

No. Well written apps don't need a window manager. But some "modern" broken apps will not work fine without a window manager (eg. firefox and its address bar suggestions which won't drop down [1]). Many other subpar apps not only assume a window manager, but to add insult to injury, a click to focus window manager. For instance, it used to be that any java ...


25

You can run xrandr as any user running an X session. Xrandr is a command line program, so you run it in your terminal. So you would run something like this in your user terminal $ xrandr --dpi 220


21

X11 - a windowing protocol (network transparent by the way) and its implementation (the X server and low level libraries for accessing it). Handles "only" basic input (keyboard, mouse,...) and output (drawing rectangles), but does it in a rather abstract fashion, so that you can run a program on one machine and control it from another one, subscribe to ...


21

From man awesome there doesn't seem to be a default key binding to close all windows of an application. It might be possible to manually add such a binding. There is, however, a default key binding to close the one focused window*: Mod4-Shift-c. This will leave other windows (if any) of the application intact. It does not work for sub-windows ("logical" ...


21

If you only want to change the DPI within i3, you could put the command in your i3 config file with the line: exec xrandr --dpi 220 Depending on your distro you will find the config file in different places but often under ~/.config/i3/config


20

You can define a binding in your i3 config. Note: windows are called "containers", and monitors are called "outputs". move workspace to output left|right|down|up|current|primary|<output> Here's what I use in my config: # move focused workspace between monitors bindsym $mod+Ctrl+greater move workspace to output right bindsym $mod+Ctrl+less move ...


16

If you experiment with this, it'll be clear: In /etc/rc2.d, you'll find files that are instructions what your computer should do when it starts. If you use GNOME, look for a file with gdm in its name, then replace the S (first letter of the name) by a lowercase s. (GDM is as you might have guessed the GNOME display manager. If you use some other suite, of ...


16

IMHO the comment by @maletor to the approved answer justify a new answer. Since version 4.13 i3 reads DPI information from Xft.dpi (source). So, to set i3 to work with high DPI screens you'll probably need to modify two files. Add this line to ~/.Xresources with your preferred value: Xft.dpi: 120 Make sure the settings are loaded properly when X starts in ...


15

try kwin --replace or DISPLAY=:0 kwin --replace if you're not in X. Source


15

This will happen if you: right click on the kate window border or it's entry in the task manager bar select 'more actions' -> 'Full screen' or press ctrl-shift-F I originally solved this by: removing katerc from ~/.kde/share/config This is best undone by: pressing ctrl-shift-F


14

This (and much much more) can be done in advanced settings of KDE's window manager KWin. You can get to it if you right click on window titlebar and select Advanced > Special Application Settings (or Special Window Settings if you would like to apply only to specific window and not all windows of this app). Then on the Size and Position tab you can force it ...


14

Here's a very short rough characterization: Display manager: The program that provides you a graphical login and then starts your session. Runs as root or dedicated user. Session manager: The program that actually controls your session. Runs under your account. Windowing system: The complete GUI drawing/control system. Describes not a component in itself, ...


13

A windowing system is a software component that provides windows for applications to draw in and can display these windows on the screen. The X Window System is the standard windowing system on Unix systems; outside Mac OS X, it doesn't really have competition (this may change if Wayland or Mir become viable). The X Window System has a client-server ...


13

create a file ~/.config/gtk-3.0/gtk.css ( add the below CSS ) then you will need to reload gnome-shell: ALT + F2 and type r I was able to reduce the app Titlebar on Gnome 3.20 with the following CSS: headerbar entry, headerbar spinbutton, headerbar button, headerbar separator { margin-top: 0px; /* same as headerbar side padding for nicer proportions */ ...


12

# This is what I use in ie config # custom variables for workspaces set $ws1 "1< txt >" set $ws2 "2> fm " set $ws3 "3< Web >" set $ws4 4 set $ws5 5 set $ws6 6 set $ws7 7 set $ws8 8 set $ws9 9 ##==================================================## # *** Workspace specific settings *** # ##============...


12

That dot is to stick window visible on all workspaces.


12

Apparently this problem has been around for years, and one bug report has been closed "won't fix". The issue has been reopened with Bug 11808 - Xfwm: Increase the resize border of window. The width of the grab area is controlled by the theme. Another circumvention is to try different themes until you find one you can live with. One developer has ...


11

dwm is a minimalist window manager that just manages windows. What you are asking requires a bit of a workaround. There are two separate, but related steps. First, set up your rules for irrsi in config.h - specifying the tag in which you would like it to appear and whether it should be floating or not. Something like this will open irssi in the first tag: {...


11

You can simply place code in a separate file and include it with dofile("somefile.lua") Note: The working directory is $HOME. To specify a file relative to rc.lua you can use dofile(awful.util.getdir("config") .. "/" .. "somefile.lua") If it's more than just some code and it might be used by others as well, it might make sense to create a lua module ...


11

In the Settings Manager choose Window Manager Tweaks, then on the third tab, Accessibility you will find the control Key used to grab and move windows:


11

Headerbar/CSD Actually, a section of the code that I found via reddit and posted above, namely headerbar entry, headerbar spinbutton, headerbar button, headerbar separator { margin-top: 2px; /* same as headerbar side padding for nicer proportions */ margin-bottom: 2px; } DOES modify the headerbars/CSDs. However the effect is not immediate. Even if ...


10

Minimizing a window might free a little memory, but it depends on the application, and it won't amount to much. In any case, minimizing won't make more difference than any other form of hiding. Even if an application's window is minimized, it's still running. The application isn't going to need to keep less data in memory just because one of its windows is ...


10

Go to System Settings → Window Behaviour → Window Rules. Click on the ‘New…’ button. Add a description like ‘maximise everything on start’. Go to the ‘Size & Position’ tab, then enable the checkboxes for ‘Maximised horizontally’ and ‘Maximised vertically’. For each of them, set the drop-down to ‘Apply Initially’, and the radio button to ‘Yes’. Click ‘OK’,...


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