44

Most terminals can be launched using the geometry switch allowing you to specify terminal's size and position (COLUMNSxROWS+X+Y) e.g.: gnome-terminal --geometry 73x31+100+300 or xterm -geometry 93x31+100+350 If you want to make the above permanent, copy the terminal launcher (terminal's .desktop file) from /usr/share/applications/ to ~/.local/share/...


26

There are several extensions on the GNOME extensions site which can give you various modes of "snapping" your windows. One that works particularly well is gTile.     References Keyboard Shortcuts GNOME 3


21

From man awesome there doesn't seem to be a default key binding to close all windows of an application. It might be possible to manually add such a binding. There is, however, a default key binding to close the one focused window*: Mod4-Shift-c. This will leave other windows (if any) of the application intact. It does not work for sub-windows ("logical" ...


18

To move it to a different monitor, right click on an empty area, select "Properties" and then uncheck the 'Expand' box. Now left click on the end one of the ends and drag it to a different monitor. Right click again on the end (making sure not to hit any other widget in the panel) and click on Expand again.


18

Taken from comments, here's the answer that helped me, no tools needed. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Ctrl+Super+Left Arrow - Dock to the left side of your monitor Ctrl+Super+Right Arrow - Dock to the right side of your monitor Ctrl+Super+Up Arrow - Maximize the window Ctrl+Super+Down Arrow (When docked or maximized) - Restore the window. Ctrl+Super+Down Arrow (...


18

I found the answer by watch the video tutorial on i3 website: Shift+$mod+Up Focus parent: $mod+a I hope this might be useful for other people who is also new to the i3wm.


16

@msw did a good job explaining your 2nd Q, and some of your 1st: B) Suggest any relatively-easy ways to regain any form of control, to (at the very least) save the tabs I had annoyingly opened in Private Browsing mode? So I'll try and address your 1st Q a bit more: A) Elaborate as to what the state is, in more detail? The state values Sl (That's a ...


15

I believe the related man page is, XKillClient. You can use xdotool to simulate the close button being clicked from a terminal like so. Example Assuming I have a gnome-terminal open and it's name is "saml@grinchy:/home". Get the window ID $ xdotool search --name "saml@grinchy:/home" 96488188 Send it a Alt+F4 $ xdotool windowactivate --sync 96488188 key ...


14

See shelltile. It's a neat little extension that allows the corner snapping, as well as other very useful features.


14

Settings/Window Manager/Focus Focus follows mouse (on) [shouldn't matter, but the focus stealing prevention setting seems to work better with this on] Automatically give Focus to newly created windows (off) Also Settings/Window Manager Tweaks/Focus Activate Focus Stealing Prevention (on) Honor standard ICCCM focus hint (off) When a window raises ...


13

Yes...there is a way in Linux to do so ( and to your surprise, it will also work in Windows too ) Just press Alt+Spacebar then hit the key m and then move wherever you want by usin the arrow keys. Once you done, hit the Enter key. And, oh yeah, It will work if and only if the window in question is not fully maximized


13

My xdotool help informs me that your two switches are the same (xdotool version 3.20150503.1), --name check regexp_pattern agains the window name --title DEPRECATED. Same as --name. and as such doesn't do anything. My xdotool does the same as yours with replacing the window stack, so I did it with a shell script. A shell script doing what ...


12

You can do this using wmctrl. Example Get your window's ID. $ wmctrl -l 0x02a00004 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ 0x0620004f 0 grinchy [gnome] Bash command for Maximizing and Unmaximizing windows in gnome? - Google Chrome Then toggle window ID 0x0620004f, like so. $ wmctrl -i -r 0x0620004f -b toggle,maximized_vert,maximized_horz


12

Add to ~/.config/gtk-3.0/gtk.css: .window-frame { box-shadow: none; margin: 0; } (via https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=1416334#p1416334) I had to restart X for it to take effect - SIGHUP awesome was not sufficient.


10

The panel appears on the primary monitor. You have not said how you are setting your system up so I can't give you a very detailed answer. You will need to use xrandr to find out you current setup. In my case this is: $ xrandr | grep -w connected VGA-0 connected 1440x900+1600+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 408mm x 255mm DP-3 connected 1600x900+...


10

If I'm not mistaken, it's supposed to stick the window to the screen, making it visible on all workspaces.


7

You did not do anything to the Firefox process. It was already in state S before. “Interruptible sleep” effectively means idle. The process is waiting, and will wake up when it receives an input. That's the normal state of a process unless you catch it while it's busy. You have made the window disappear. Maybe you sent it to a different desktop. How to ...


6

I got the answer here. this would be the script to maximize it to the right half of the screen: #!/bin/bash # resizes the window to full height and 50% width and moves into upper right corner #define the height in px of the top system-bar: TOPMARGIN=27 #sum in px of all horizontal borders: RIGHTMARGIN=10 # get width of screen and height of screen ...


6

xterm Options Using Xresources or Xdefaults This is the general "syntax" for options that go into the ~/.Xresources or ~/.Xdefaults file: XTerm*geometry: COLUMNSxROWS+X+Y For example XTerm*geometry: 90x30+0+540 Note: The first two options (COLUMNSxROWS) depend on your font type/size. Furthermore, it also depends on the resolution of your Display, as ...


6

The supplied answer from Uwe did not work for me, but this did: echo -ne "\e[10;2;t" From this page.


6

With wmctrl: wmctrl -a 'title substring' With xdotool: xdotool search 'title substring' windowactivate With xdotool, you can refine the search by window class (i.e. by application), e.g. xdotool search --all --class XTerm --name 'title substring' windowactivate


6

You can set up an X server inside an X server using Xephyr. You can create a window on your screen which displays the contents of a new X display: Xephyr :1 To start with, that will be empty. You can launch an application or applications pointed at that new display: DISPLAY=:1 some-application All windows that arise from that application will be ...


6

You can get xterm's dimensions via the environmental variables $COLUMNS and $LINES. You can then set the title via certain escape codes documented e.g. in Bash Prompt HOWTO. Here is a one-off command to set title: # The title text is the stuff between ; and \a printf "\e]0;${COLUMNS}x${LINES}\a" I don't know if there is a way to update the title when the ...


6

I was able to identify short and unix-way solution: comm -12 \ <(xdotool search --name 'title-pattern' | sort) \ <(xdotool search --class 'class-pattern' | sort)


6

As Dave says, xpra is ideal for this. You need to start an xpra session on the system where your application will be run (not displayed): xpra start :20 (20 must be a free X display number — I usually start at 20, that leaves room for multiple local X servers and incoming forwarded X sessions using SSH.) Then you start your application on display 20: ...


5

The commands are echo -ne '\e[9;1t' to maximize and echo -ne '\e[9;0t' to restore the original size. It's described in the xterm control sequences documentation.


5

I suggest the extension Put Window. It has many customization options, ability to modify hot keys, etc.. Similar to all extensions it can be installed and activated at extensions.gnome.org


4

you do not need any external tools, just read man fluxbox-apps, edit .fluxbox/apps and put there something like [app] (name=xyz) [workspace] (n) [end]


4

Use gdevilspie to match this application and set the workspace.


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