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This page may help. There it explains some of the terminology as well as a whole host of details on peer to peer wifi: Wi-Fi Direct devices, formally known as P2P Devices, communicate by establishing P2P Groups, which are functionally equivalent to traditional Wi-Fi infrastructure networks. The device implementing AP like functionality in the P2P Group is ...


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Since you're using nmtui, you should also have nmcli. With that you can follow the post Connect to a wireless network using command line nmcli. Check you can see the wireless NIC and that the radio is enabled (basically “Airplane” mode): # nmcli radio WIFI-HW WIFI WWAN-HW WWAN enabled enabled enabled enabled # nmcli device DEVICE TYPE ...


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I have experienced the same problems with this adapter and after debugging the drivers for a long time, I did not find the problem. Then I have noticed that the same problems also exists under Windows, which were installed on the same machine (with dual boot). This would make driver problems a hell of a coincidence so I started suspecting, that the problem ...


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The Intel 5100 AGN wifi card require a proprietary software (firmware-iwlwifi non-free). As defined in the tag info trisquel reuses Ubuntu packages and avoids using non-free packages. Installing a non-free software on a GNU distribution doesn't make sense, it conflict with the philosophy of the gnu project. To get the wifi working you need a PCI wifi ...


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You need to install the wifi driver for the Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260, follow the installation guide on debian wiki (replace stretch by buster): Add a non-free component to /etc/apt/sources.list, for example: deb http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ buster main contrib non-free Update the list of available packages and install the firmware-iwlwifi ...


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Download and install the firmware for your device's wireless adapter. If your device uses an Intel WLAN adapter, follow this guide. If your device isn't connected to the internet, the iwlwifi firmware can be installed without an internet connection: Download the iwlwifi firmware from here. Move the .deb file to your device. Install the file: $ sudo dpkg -...


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$ wpa_cli > add_network x > set_network x ssid "hidden_ssid" > set_network x psk "secret" // ALLOW CONNECT TO HIDDEN SSID > set_network x scan_ssid 1 > enable_network x > save_config > select_network x


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As others said, the issue is caused by non-standard name the device gets (i.e. not wlan*). Below is the proper ways to set the name of the network interface when using systemd.networkd or NetworkManager. systemd.networkd While linking to /dev/null may solve the problem, the proper way is to create a .link file setting the device name. Create /etc/systemd/...


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There's several ways to do this. Here is two: Blacklist the module corresponding to the driver of your Wifi card. (see this doc. Usually it is done by creating a file on /etc/modprobe.d which content is "blacklist ") Edit dhcpcd configuration file to deny your Wifi NIC (see man 5 dhcpcd.conf)


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While not quite exactly what I was looking for, I was able to get it running. This was through Raspbian's rapsi-config utility. Steps were as follows: Run the rasps-config command with root privileges. Choose the second option: "Network Options" Enter SSID and Passphrase Find and open your "wpa_supplicant.conf" file. Mine is located in /etc/...


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I'm not totally sure this solved it, but it may be worth trying to upgrade your bios. I have since done that it seems to work now. This also fixed a weird issue where I believe the wifi card would stop the system from suspending. As a side note, something I didn't know at the time I made this post is that intel versions the firmware blob the kernel runs. ...


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Under macOS 10.14.6, the SSID of the network you are currently connected to can be gathered with the following command: ioreg -l -n AirPortDriver | grep IO80211SSID | sed 's/^.*= "\(.*\)".*$/\1/; s/ /_/g


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Most wireless cards these days require some sort of firmware. Most of this firmware is not free software, so it isn't included in the main Debian archive. If you're using Debian Live, you should try the unofficial version with non-free software, which is required for that non-free firmware. If you're installing Debian, make sure you answer “yes” to the ...


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See 6.4. Loading Missing Firmware from the Debian GNU/Linux Installation Guide. If a device driver requests firmware that is not available, debian-installer will display a dialog offering to load the missing firmware. If this option is selected, debian-installer will scan available devices for either loose firmware files or packages containing ...


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What solved the problem for me is installing the correct wireless drivers. Here are the steps I followed: Run the following to determine Wireless chipset. lspci | grep -i Network It returned the following for me: 02:00.0 Network controller: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries BCM43224 82.11a/b/g/n (rev 01) Search for the right driver to install. sudo apt ...


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