25

I have no idea why the configuration option is not available in the gnome control panel but you can set this using dconf-editor. Run dconf-editor from a terminal, navigate to org.gnome.desktop.background -> picture options and set it to spanned:


8

Installing gnome-tweak-tool lets you customize not only the wallpaper alignment, but other absent options such as enabling / disabling minimize and maximize buttons, showing icons on the desktop, changing the shell theme and colors, changing fonts and its options (size, hinting, etc).


7

Managed to solve the problem, at least in Unity, but I guess it would work in Gnome 3 as well: This setting was false: $ gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons false So I changed it: $ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons true And got my desktop background and icons instantly.


7

You can use the ssh LocalCommand to emit the ANSI escape sequence to change background color, and have a section per host (or host pattern) to select the appropriate color you want to correspond to the remote host. If your production servers follow a naming convention like "starts with prod", you can try the following snippet in your ~/.ssh/config file: ...


6

Use xsnow after having killed the desktop application that covers the root window. Run xkill and click on the desktop. That works at least in LXDE where pcmanfm usually handles the desktop, but should work in other environments as long as they don't require there being a desktop window in the background and don't restart it automatically when it dies.


6

Is there any way I could set the [Wallpapers] tab to automatically find new pictures under /usr/share/backgrounds/ as well? There's no such option. The [Wallpapers] tab shows the default choice of wallpapers (which may vary depending on distros/admins) available to all users. Distros/admins may choose to alter the content of /usr/share/backgrounds/ (along ...


6

The stock Kali wallpapers images are stored in: /usr/share/images/desktop-base/ The current wallpaper is set by linking /etc/alternatives/desktop-background to whichever .png file in /usr/share/images/desktop-base/ that you would like to set it as; although you could link it to a .png file in any other folder that you choose.


4

You can use feh: feh --bg-scale /path/to/wallpaper You can also set up bash scripts to change wallpaper to random one every X minutes(I use it with feh), get random wallpaper on each boot, etc. The Arch wiki explains it nicely.


3

/usr/share/gnome-background-properties/desktop-backgrounds-default.xml holds the settings for the wallpapers; while there doesn't seem to be any command to rescan that XML file (one still can add further XML files into there, which keep an up-to-date index of some other directory). however, one can define individual filenames: gsettings set org.gnome....


3

Desktop icons are handled by the file manager, which is Nemo in Cinnamon Edition Caja in MATE Edition Thunar in Xfce Edition With KDE there's a special case, as there are no icons directly on the desktop. Here, desktop icons are held by certain widgets, which are AFAIK controlled by the desktop environment. Wallpapers are being managed by the desktop ...


3

You have to go into the desktop manager and play with the settings, I believe you have to go into the settings manager, choose the desktop settings, change single image to image list, choose which wallpaper then repeat for the second monitor.


3

I thought that a lua script (started by Conky) would be a good tool for this job. There's loads of conky examples on the internet (e.g. here and here), which could be used to make it snow on your desktop only when it's snowing outside, for example. I saw on a forum that some guy had posted some video tutorials on how to write a lua script for fireworks as ...


3

Rather than mess with dconf you can use feh --bg-max to set the background image fairly easily. $ feh --bg-max <image> I use this type of script to rotate the background image every 15 minutes, for example: while true; do find ~/.wallpaper -type f \( -name '*.jpg' -o -name '*.png' \) -print0 | shuf -n1 -z | xargs -0 feh --bg-max sleep 15m ...


3

xsetroot allows you to specify greyscale or solid colour backgrounds.


2

The bit you are looking for is xfdesktop. You should be able to disable it in the session manager (xfce4-session-settings)


2

No. This is a open bug for more than 10 years now and for some reason, it looks like there is no volunteer to take a stab at fixing it ... https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=48004


2

Yes, I agree that this is suprisingly hard to do. What I have found out it that the right way to do this is to add an XML file to ~/.local/share/gnome-background-properties/. This XML should contain references to all your wallpapers. You can probably find an example file in /usr/share/gnome-background-properties. I know this doesn't really answer your ...


2

I think what you need is fbcondecor ! here : https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fbsplash#Console_backgrounds Oh, and you do need a patchd kernel.


2

Try this. Make a file called /usr/share/images/desktop-base/lockscreen.xml, somewhat like this: <background> <static> <duration>8640000.0</duration> <file> <size width="1920" height="1080">/path/to/wallpaper.jpg</size> </file> </static> </background> Then link the file like ...


2

According to this Super User Q&A, you can try: xloadimage -onroot -fullscreen /path/to/background_image Or xpmroot /path/to/background_image Or, and this should work on pretty much any desktop environment: feh --bg-fill /path/to/background_image


2

If lightdm is configured with autologin-user, it doesn't run any greeter. It immediately opens a session for the given user and hands over to a window manager. Setting your window manager's background should do what you want, e.g. for openbox add something similar to: xsetbg /usr/share/pixmaps/splash.png & to your ~/.config/openbox. Note, that openbox ...


2

A bit cumbersome, but you could use a different tool to handle your wallpaper, such as feh feh --bg-scale /path/to/image Hope this can help.


1

If Gnome doesn't have anything built in, you can write a script to do it. The following loads random wallpapers from ~/wallpapers on three monitors, assumed to be arranged left-to-right with each monitor being 1680 pixels wide. It uses xloadimage (see Multiple images on root window with ImageMagick). Adjust the monitor sizes and the wallpaper locations as ...


1

I encountered this problem when lxde-meta was emerged without having set the "desktop" profile. This means that the 'jpeg' USE flag is not set (along with all other imagine flags). LXDE can still be installed, but when it pulls in the package "gdk-pixbuf" (responsible for loading images) it is compiled without jpeg support. This causes the black background (...


1

I also struggled with this for a little while, but what worked for me was annoyingly simple (and it also works for a custom desktop image): have your file in a file-explorer window ready to click on. right-click on the desktop and select Change Desktop Background select the lock-screen to customise (or the desktop) for a list of pictures available drag the ...


1

I use the following in ~/.config/i3/config: exec /usr/bin/gifview --animate -w root /path/to/image.gif


1

Let's split the solution into two parts: Locate where the setting is kept. Reasonable programs keep their user settings in "dot" files in $HOME, usually either in a .progname (be it a file or a directory with more complex configurations) or under .config/. XFCE uses the latter, with desktop settings being stored in ~/.config/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-...


1

I totally forgot that awsetbg is just shell script which uses $HOME variable. awsetbg - awesome wrapper tool to set background So HOME needs to be set. * * * * * ad DISPLAY=:0,HOME=/home/ad /usr/bin/awsetbg -a -r /home/ad/img/beauty/ If you will use directly some app, it will work just with DISPLAY env: * * * * * ad DISPLAY=:0 feh --bg-max --...


1

I guess it's changing HOME=/ to HOME=/home/ad.


1

In my case, I am using the openbox-lxde window manager, but the desktop preferences are handled by pcmanfm. The pcmanfm --desktop-pref opens a menu which allows for setting the wallpaper. The config is updated at /home/username/.config/pcmanfm/LXDE/pcmanfm.conf which is now the default config file for this system's desktop settings. To summarize what is ...


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