43

Ultimately, it was an arbitrary choice made by the creators of Unix over four decades ago now. They could have chosen to make things case-insensitive like the creators of MS-DOS did a decade later, but that has its disadvantages, too. It's too deeply embedded in *ix culture to change now. The case sensitive filesystem issue brought up by eppesuig is only ...


38

The administrator(s) of a system are likely to want to know when a non-privileged user tries but fails to execute commands using sudo. If this happens, it could be a sign of a curious legitimate user just trying things out, or a hacker trying to do "bad things". Since sudo by itself can not distinguish between these, failed attempts to use sudo are ...


37

A normal, "modeless" editor is like Notepad on Windows: there is only one mode, where you input text. Vi, and it's successor Vim, are modal: there are two primary modes1, insert mode where you type text into the editor and it is committed to the document, and normal mode where you enter arguments via the keyboard that perform a variety of functions, ...


26

getopt vs getopts seems to be a religious issue. As for the arguments against getopt in the Bash FAQ: "getopt cannot handle empty arguments strings" seems to refer to a known issue with optional arguments, which it looks like getopts doesn't support at all (at least from reading help getopts for Bash 4.2.24). From man getopt: getopt(3) can parse long ...


17

How about :e .? This opens the current directory in Vim, i.e. it opens the file explorer. Because I have autochdir setting set, this shows the directory that the currently edited file is in.


16

The “kill” meaning of Ctrl+C is very old, I think even older than Unix. Wikipedia traces it back to TOPS-10, which would date it from the late 1960s. The article explains why Ctrl+C was a reasonable choice: in ASCII, which was published in 1963, the corresponding character is ETX, end-of-text. Lacking a character meaning “stop”¹, a character meaning “this ...


15

In Debian and its derivatives, the sudo incident reports are logged to /var/log/auth.log which contains system authorization information, including user logins and authentication mechanisms that were used: $ sudo su [sudo] password for regularjohn: regularjohn is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported. [as root] $ tail -n 1 /var/log/...


14

In the simple case, you can ask less not to handle SIGINT, then Control-C will kill it and the exit code will be non-zero. Do this with option -K. command && check-status | less -K && followup-command As a workaround for older versions of less, you can do something like command && bash -c 'trap "exit 1" int;check-status | less -K;' ...


12

This is entirely up to you but most programs do someting like this program --help Usage: program [<options>][<arguments> ...] Options: --help show this message, then exit --something after some spaces for alignment, an explenation follows. You should check out getopt which most programs (this is also available in programming ...


11

I'm not sure but I think that you want the :rew command


11

There's this getopts_long written as a POSIX shell function that you may embed inside your script. Note that the Linux getopt (from util-linux) works correctly when not in traditional mode and supports long options, but is probably not an option for you if you need to be portable to other Unices. Recent versions of ksh93 (getopts) and zsh (zparseopts) ...


9

If it has to be portable to a range of Unices, you'd have to stick to POSIX sh. And AFAIU there you just have no choice but rolling argument handling by hand.


9

Use ^O to fallback previous opened file, which is your dir tree in this case.


8

This is not a "terminal" problem, it is a file system feature. How should the shell look for your commands on the (always case sensitive) file system?


8

Case sensitive is part of the POSIX way of handling command and argument it has nothing to do with the meaning. It's a very good thing that Status and status are not the same because the file system which kind of a base in the system is case sensitive (because of POSIX rules). It's usually a good pratice to keep the same behavior in your whole system. ...


8

is there any reason to be case-sensitive? It leaves a much bigger namespace available. For example, a later version of git could implement uppercase variations on command names, or allow the user to define macros/aliases, as with the shell, where you can define your own MV, CP, etc. without having to redefine mv, cp, etc.


7

Technically, it doesn't mean anything much. Many (if not all) other software logs logins, failed or otherwise. For example sshd and su: Jun 21 17:52:22 somehost sshd[25807]: pam_unix(sshd:auth): authentication failure; logname= uid=0 euid=0 tty=ssh ruser= rhost=::1 user=root Jun 21 17:52:22 somehost sshd[25807]: Failed password for root from ::1 port 37268 ...


6

The technical systems that I use and respect are almost exclusively case-sensitive: be it OS or programming language or anything else. The exceptions I could think of right now is the HTML tags and some implementations of SQL, and the Ada programming language. Even in those cases, I think there are strong tendencies to actually write HTML tags in lowercase,...


6

http://www.gnome.org/getting-gnome/ Fedora Just install or try it live to use GNOME 3. openSUSE GNOME 3.2 is the default desktop environment of openSUSE 12.1. Mageia GNOME 3 will be part of Mageia 2. Install ‘task-gnome’ after installing Mageia. Arch Linux Arch Linux has GNOME 3 in the extra repository. Ubuntu ...


6

Openbox and Window Maker are great suggestions. You may also have luck with related projects and derivatives; I had a good experience with Fluxbox on Crunchbang (Ubuntu-based). Lubuntu, with the LXDE desktop environment is very lightweight while providing a bit more out-of-the-box infrastructure than going without any desktop environment. Though, I've ...


6

It simply means that someone tried to use the sudo command (to access admin privileges), who doesn't have authorization to use it (because they aren't listed in the sudoers file). This could be a hacking attempt or some other sort of security risk, so the message is saying that the attempted use of sudo will be reported to the system administrator, so they ...


5

I am not a fan of overriding built-in commands, but in my .bashrc (part of Tilde, my "dot files") I explicitly do this: alias rm='rm -i'; This makes rm ask for permission before deleting. It has saved me a few times. You can always override with rm -f.


5

To disable the login manager permanently on Ubuntu you can do the following: sudo sh -c "echo 'manual' > /etc/init/lightdm.override" To start the login manager manually when needed you would do: sudo service lightdm start To stop it manually: sudo service lightdm stop


5

Look at it from another perspective. The computer has no knowledge of language or letters, what it sees are numbers that are then mapped to characters. While I (the letter I) and | (the pipe) may look very similar to you, they are completely different to the computer. To illustrate, have a look at the table below. You will see that there is no ...


5

You are, most likely, abusing lxdialog. That is supposed to be used only together all other configuration stuff. If You really need a configuration tool to be used at compile time (i.e.:"make menuconfig && make all") then you will find documentation to make kconfig work for you in kernel/Documentation/kconfig directory (and other places, but You ...


5

The GVFS documentation has a file about Controlling What is Shown in the User Interface. In short, you have two ways to do this: If it's in /etc/fstab, add x-gvfs-hide as one of the options (or, for older versions of udisks2, comment=gvfs-hide). Configure udev to set the $ENV{UDISKS_IGNORE}="1" for the relevant device. For example, here is how I hide ...


5

Dialogs in Debian package configuration scripts are typically handled by debconf; packages which support this will have matching .config and .templates files in /var/lib/dpkg/info (e.g. /var/lib/dpkg/info/tzdata.config and /var/lib/dpkg/info/tzdata.templates). (This provides other benefits too, such as simple support for pre-seeding.) Running dpkg-...


4

In user interface design, a mode is a distinct setting within a computer program or any physical machine interface, in which the same user input will produce perceived different results than it would in other settings. The best-known modal interface components are probably the Caps lock and Insert keys on the standard computer keyboard, both of which put the ...


4

It's no more or less strange than the fact that we have an upper and lower case alphabet to start with. If you look in /usr/bin, you'll notice a (very) few executables exploit capitalization. A case sensitive namespace is not just twice as big as an insensitive one -- the difference grows exponentially with word length. Eg, using 26 characters, there are ...


4

$ man evim NAME evim - easy Vim, edit a file with Vim and setup for modeless editing SYNOPSIS evim [options] [file ..] eview DESCRIPTION eVim starts Vim and sets options to make it behave like a modeless edi‐ tor. This is still Vim but used as a point-and-click editor. This feels a lot like using Notepad on ...


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