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6

/dev/sd* can be accessed without mount. Indeed, I have written a file directly to /dev/sdb before with success, but what I wrote to was the raw USB disk. The file I wrote was a disk image of an Ubuntu install disk when I then used to make a bootable USB stick for installing Ubuntu on a new computer. You can write to /dev/sda as if it were a file, but it's ...


3

I suspect the comment you’re referring to is this one: See PhotoRec, it fits your requirements and is available packaged in most Linux distributions. For more advanced recovery, see also Foremost. These tools are file recovery tools, designed to retrieve deleted files; they won’t help you fix corrupted file contents. The corruption you’re describing ...


2

First off, MBR (Legacy) is becoming less common these days and is gradually being replaced with EFI. As your question doesn't explicitly say you know you are using legacy boot and not EFI, I'll suggest you check which you are actually using. To do this boot into your working (main) Debian system and look for: ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars/ If this exists ...


2

Please connect the earbuds to the computer and run this command: lsusb -d 18d1:5033 -v | grep Class If the output includes the words Audio and Streaming anywhere, there is hope: the earbuds have a built-in DAC and may be recognizable as a standard USB audio device. But if that word is not visible, it might be that the only digital electronics in the ...


2

You can certainly copy files directly from /home/user/whatever to /dev/sdb directly assuming you have write privileges to the raw device. However, since you're now bypassing the filesystem on that device you'll just have a stream of bytes on /dev/sdb. The FAT or NTFS, or ext4 file system that used to be there is now gone since you didn't go through the file ...


1

Linux kernel error codes are defined in errno.h. The return value is negative, but the code itself is positive, and you'll find #define ETIMEDOUT 110 /* Connection timed out */ So the iPhone appears as a USB ethernet device, and then the kernel tries to set the (virtual) carrier for this device by sending an USB control message, but this message is not ...


1

The optical mouse on my laptop running Ubuntu 18.04 on the 4.15.0-51-generic kernel just quit working for some reason. First I tried the normal quick remedies that is unplugging and re-plugging first on the same port and then on the other two unused ports; the mouse still didn't work. I have to point out that I still had power on the USB ports. So I was ...


1

Essentially, what you're looking for is called persistence. UNetbootin supports it for Ubuntu, I believe, but for Kali you're going to need to set it up manually. First things first, if you're installing to a flash drive, don't touch the GRUB installation on your main linux install. This article takes you through the steps of installation, summarized ...


1

If I try to mount a FreeBSD filesystem on my Linux host, I see the same error you report: mount: /mnt: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/loop0p3, missing codepage or helper program, or other error. We can get additional details on that error by taking a look at the kernel log: $ dmesg | tail [...] [1767775.494027] ufs: You didn't specify ...


1

Mounting isn't absolutely necessary, for example the mtools suite can access FAT filesystems directly, without kernel support. But you do need a filesystem driver in one form or another to access filesystems on the disk, be it a kernel driver used when the fs is mounted, or a userspace utility. If you don't have a filesystem on the drive (or don't care ...


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