New answers tagged

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Despite UEFI being an ungodly mess that also allows more network capabilities than the BIOS, the chances of being targeted by a hacker aiming for the UEFI and being sucessful are ridiculously tiny. Also, plenty of PC have run for decades with BIOS not even updated once for more than 15 years (and also UEFI PC for 10 years now), and are still doing fine even ...


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It looks like this has been answered recently. How do I triple boot Windows 10, Arch Linux, and Ubuntu 18.04? The accepted answer points to a post by edward Torvalds that resolves a kernel panic issue. I hope it helps GRUB confuses kernels/initramfs of Ubuntu and Arch Linux installation


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On latest Ubuntu 20.04: sudo qemu-system-x86_64 -enable-kvm -bios /usr/share/ovmf/OVMF.fd -hda myimage.raw On earlier Ubuntu's and perhaps other Linuxes: cd ~ git clone git://github.com/tianocore/edk2.git cd edk2 git submodule init git submodule update --depth=1 make -C BaseTools . edksetup.sh vi Conf/target.txt ACTIVE_PLATFORM = MdeModulePkg/...


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Try This method has only been tested on a multi drive system Find Windows EFI Partition lsblk -o NAME,FSTYPE,SIZE,MOUNTPOINT Create Path & Mount Windows EFI Partition sudo mkdir /mnt/win-efi sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/win-efi Copy Contents of Windows EFI to POP EFI sudo cp -r /mnt/win-efi/EFI/Microsoft /boot/efi/EFI Add timer to bootloader sudo micro /...


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A normal BIOS does more than just set up your hardware, it also implements a large amount of functions that can be called by 16-bit real-mode code to perform various low-level actions and retrieve low-level information about the system. The BIOS can provide this low-level functionality because your BIOS by design is very low level (it initializes your system ...


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In my case I had to run gdisk to write a GPT instead of an MBR to the disk.


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I encountered this problem today after upgrading to Fedora 33. I foolishly ran the 'dnf autoremove' command mentioned on the Fedora Wiki page, which is probably what removed my grub and shim config. The steps I needed are broadly similar to Smurph269's above (although the source link URL was very useful)... Download a Live Image and boot from it. Open a ...


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I could add the missing modules by installing grub2-efi-x64-modules package on Fedora. In my case I had another error after that that "EFI variables were not supported on my system". I found another stackexchange post and could fix that by exiting the chroot environment and loading the efivarfs module by modprobe efivarfs. Then I logged back in ...


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As you note, if it is an EFI partition from a former Linux install, you can certainly delete it. To answer your second question, NO, it does not matter if your "real" EFI partition is in the middle, or the end, or the beginning, of all your other partitions.


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sudo update-initramfs should solve the problem.


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