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1

When you mention "boot instructions written to the motherboard chip", you're referring to UEFI NVRAM boot variables. According to the UEFI specifications, having multiple boot variables at the same time should not be a problem: the system will try them in order specified by the BootOrder variable. Also, the UEFI specification defines a way to make ...


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In the linked Wiki (which does not contain that exact phrase any more), there is a section (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Systemd-boot#Preparing_kernels_for_/EFI/Linux), which applies only, if you want to create such a special kernel. Other than that, the linux kernel is placed in /boot whenever you install/update the linux package with pacman, i.e. ...


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I suddenly found that after some updates Windows has set the Fast boot option to enabled. And that caused my ubuntu boot problem)) Fast boot option can be found somewhere in your BIOS/boot settings


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You can install Fedora version 27 or later. Fedora included the required files on it's standard 64bit ISO installer. However Fedora doesn't have the LTS option that Ubuntu has. Ubuntu as of 18.04 LTS does not support this out of the box. People have jumped through hoops to get these installs done, but it isn't trivial.


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The first part (stage 1) is stored in the first 448 bytes, which is responsible for passing control to the so-called stage 1.5, located a little later in memory. This stage finally loads stage 2 from the /boot folder, and transfers control to it. The names "stage1", "stage1.5" and "stage2" belong to GRUB Legacy, i.e. GRUB versions 0.xx. When stage 1 is ...


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If you look at the sources of GRUB, available here, you find stage1 is actually defined at grub/grub-core/boot/i386/pc/boot.S. It can perform a floppy boot if configured. It does boot from a configured harddisk, and it needs to know which C/H/S it has to load stage1.5 from. The only automatic function it has is determining which drive the boot sector was ...


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If you don't manage to boot via grub rescue, you could install Super Grub2 Disk to a USB thumb drive to boot into Debian and reinstall grub. Instructions: If not already done, I would suggest you put all drives back in to prevent any drive numbering hiccup. Make sure your BIOS is set to UEFI and not to Legacy boot mode. If it's set to UEFI/Legacy mode, ...


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I'm facing the same issue as you with a laptop ACER Apire VX5-591G series [NVIDA GEFORCE GTX, Intel i7]. I have this problem 2 years ago and tried many different distributions: Manjaro, Debian, Ubuntu, Elementary OS and, in all of them, I had the laptop freezing on shutdown. I tries all the suggestions in changing the acpi mode, editing the grub files, etc. ...


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