Hot answers tagged

8

Windows formatted you EFI partition and thus its ID changed... you need to add the UUID of the new partition to the one in your /etc/fstab. if you enter maintenance mode or have a terminal which seems you do, do this... sudo blkid write down the UUID of the EFI partition then sudo nano /etc/fstab change the UUID of the old EFI partition to the one you ...


5

You are on the correct track already. GPU Passthrough is not perfect, especially if it's an NVidia Card (Which you don't mention NVidia or AMD). Finish the setup on the Qemu Window. Make sure the Windows Machine is connected to Internet and let Windows Update install the graphics drivers for you. When you come back you should be greeted by a second monitor, ...


5

Yes, that laptop has an UEFI version of the GRUB bootloader installed - you can see the /efi/ubuntu/grubx64.efi file. But there is no MBR-style bootloader installed, as evidenced by the output => No boot loader is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda No, UEFI is not technically a bootloader. UEFI is a system firmware, and replaces BIOS in that role on ...


4

This is some funny thing happening to many PC dual booting with Windows 10. Happened to me and friends recently. Please note that I don't know why, I can only speculate this depends on some Windows 10 updates. As someone said, indeed this is due to the boot process not finding the root partition for some reason, so GRUB asks you to tell him where it is via ...


3

mount ESP to /boot. This is the preferred method when directly booting a EFISTUB kernel from UEFI. This part of the instructions attempts to say something like this: "If you choose EFISTUB as your boot method, then you'll should preferably do two things: at installation time: mount ESP to the location that will be /boot in the Arch-to-be-installed before ...


3

One of two things are the issue: You created a UEFI only Installer USB Your booting in UEFI mode and need to boot in MBR/Legacy Mode. If you can get to the CLI try this : https://askubuntu.com/questions/162564/how-can-i-tell-if-my-system-was-booted-as-efi-uefi-or-bios Update: When I have a USB/ISO that is both UEFI/MBR compatible it usually shows two ...


3

I did it with this: sudo qemu-system-x86_64 --enable-kvm \ -name TESTVM,process=TESTVM \ -drive id=disk0,if=virtio,cache=none,format=raw,file=/dev/nvme-tank/ntfs-zvol,index=2 \ -smp 4 \ -cpu core2duo,kvm=off \ -m 4096 \ -device vfio-pci,host=43:00.0,multifunction=on \ -device vfio-pci,host=43:00.1 \ -drive if=pflash,format=raw,readonly,file=/usr/share/OVMF/...


3

The first part (stage 1) is stored in the first 448 bytes, which is responsible for passing control to the so-called stage 1.5, located a little later in memory. This stage finally loads stage 2 from the /boot folder, and transfers control to it. The names "stage1", "stage1.5" and "stage2" belong to GRUB Legacy, i.e. GRUB versions 0.xx. When stage 1 is ...


2

I ran into this issue today but was able to fix it and save my install by following these steps: Download a live CD and boot on the affected machine. Open terminal fdisk -l and cat /etc/fstab to see what devices are mounted where mount the correct devices to the corrects parts of /mnt mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc mount --bind /sys ...


2

Based on answers from Thomas and Kevin I managed to get a working procedure based on xorriso, which is available from EPEL. My goals were similar to Kevin's: Use a stock RHEL 7 installation media Implant a kickstart and configuration scripts into the resulting image Select the kickstart automatically for installation Produce an image compatible with UEFI ...


2

Your UEFI upgrade has probably reset the NVRAM settings, which on UEFI systems also include the boot configuration for installed operating systems. Not all the boot menu items are detected on-the-fly at boot time: instead, the boot items for installed operating systes are stored in UEFI NVRAM at OS installation time. I'd suggest first booting from Windows ...


2

Depending on what exactly you've tried, the problem might be not EFI per se, but Secure Boot. It is another feature on top of EFI. Most major distributions already include an installation procedure that can deal with Secure Boot, usually by using a Microsoft-signed "shim" pre-bootloader that allows loading the real bootloader. A notable exception is Debian: ...


2

I think it is worth posting a solution. Of course EFI system partition is required, but debian installer already prepares that automatically... What actually is not that obvious and caused 'black screen' on the boot was BIOS setting: "Above 4G decoding" enabled. Turning it off causes the system to boot properly Yet, I still don't know how important that ...


2

I would personally use a tool which will try to find and repair the boot partition. First boot on a live Ubuntu distro and install boot-repair: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt update sudo apt install boot-repair And then execute and hopefully recover the previous state with success (this tool saved me once a couple of months ago)...


2

I think it helps if you try to walk across the entire chain starting where you as a computer just finished Power On Self Test and have been issued to start an operating system from a particular disk. With MBR you face a lot of historic limitations and have to go very tiny steps and can only do very simple things. With UEFI you have platform drivers that can ...


2

How about one USB flash drive with multiple LiveOS on it? You can put a 32 bit distro and multiple 64 bit distros on one USB key with Multiboot, Multisystem (English web review and another English review), and XBOOT. Although not exactly what you asked for, it does give you everything on one flash drive.


2

Reading your grub.cfg file, the part that is the immediate cause of the first LUKS password request is this: cryptomount -u 99cc765bd11945e7a922436c76cfd505 set root='lvmid/vlNbhc-Fecj-bwew-vg7J-nnuy-3aCy-zl395m/Co88vm-3aMx-939B-ehD7-ijFW-Hw7p-z3gWUW' So, it looks like update-grub is preparing to read something from a LVM-based filesystem. What might that ...


2

You should note that at the time of this writing, Debian 10 is still in testing state, so there may be rough edges here and there. My guess would be that the Debian installer had no clue that the second installation was going to be on a removable drive, and overwrote the first installation's copy of GRUB on your EFI System Partition (ESP) with one ...


2

If you look at the sources of GRUB, available here, you find stage1 is actually defined at grub/grub-core/boot/i386/pc/boot.S. It can perform a floppy boot if configured. It does boot from a configured harddisk, and it needs to know which C/H/S it has to load stage1.5 from. The only automatic function it has is determining which drive the boot sector was ...


1

Turns out I should have used --removable when I installed GRUB if I wanted to be able to swap hard drives. Following the directions at the Arch wiki and renaming my bootloader fixed it right up. I don't really know why it worked in any great detail, or at least not enough to explain it in a coherent manner. It makes sense, but I would rather not make a fool ...


1

I think I have figured it out. This part was missing at the end: mount -o rw,remount /sys/firmware/efi/efivars efibootmgr -c -g --disk /dev/sda --part 1 -l \\EFI\\debian\\grubx64.efi


1

I had a similar situation when running in UEFI mode and dual booting Windows and Linux. Some firmwares give the path '/efi/microsoft/boot/bootmgfw.efi' more precedence than /efi/boot/bootx64.efi in the EFI system partition. Bootmgfw.efi is the name of the microsoft bootmanager, hense my reasoning for it prioritizing that path over the traditional bootx64.efi....


1

To anyone else who landed here looking for a solution. This setup is currently not possible due to this bug in the Syslinux/GRUB EFI bootloader. You need to pass mboot.efi directly from DHCP. Sadly this means a menu based selection is not possible in UEFI mode.


1

I had this issue today while trying to install CentOS on a USB drive. It was resolved by copying the "missing" file from one folder to another on the ESI partition. I booted into an existing Ubuntu partition... you could do the same with a rescue disk. I ran sudo blkid to get the list of partitions... for me, the EFI partition on the USB drive was /dev/...


1

You should boot into the Arch installation medium, mount all your partitions (boot, efi, root,...) into /mnt like when you are installing Arch. Then do arch-chroot /mnt and reinstall Grub in UEFI mode like described on Grub - ArchWiki.


1

If your problem is not solved by disabling the secure boot feature then you should have a look at the following link: https://wiki.debian.org/UEFI#Quirks.2C_workarounds_and_special_UEFI_features_in_Debian_and_Debian-Installer You may want to have a look at the section on the removable media path. The section regarding the removable media path may be your ...


1

From the details of SuperGrub2 : Kali linux is installed in the legacy mode (BIOS) , you should turn off the UEFI mode from your BIOS settings.


1

These are the steps to change the efi boot order on a Debian system: On the BusyBox, load kernel module for the fs, in our case: # modprobe ext4 Mount the required partitions needed. Note that root fs is on sda3 in our particular case: # mkdir /mnt # mount -t ext4 /dev/sda3 /mnt # mount /proc /mnt/proc # mount /sys /mnt/sys Chroot into it: # chroot /...


1

This still uses a DOS partition table which won't work on UEFI only systems for booting purposes. Further strictly it should work on CSM systems but from experience it doesn't always. Convert your partition table to GPT using the tool gdisk It will convert to GPT automatically and then you can check if it looks right with p.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible