32

It's likely that none of them are doing it. On my system for example where I'm using Fedora 19 and a Thinkpad 410 with a Synaptic touchpad I have no Kernel driver as well. $ lsmod|grep -iE "apple|cyapa|sermouse|synap|psmouse|vsxx|bcm" So then what's taking care of this device? Well it's actually this Kernel module: $ lsmod|grep -iE "input" uinput ...


25

This is an arcane option, only necessary on some rare devices (one of which you have). The only documentation is one line in the kernel parameters list. The i8042 controller controls PS/2 keyboards and mice in PCs. It seems that on your laptop, both the keyboard and the touchpad are connected through that chip. From what I understand from the option name ...


22

Debian Jessie To enable the touchpad tapping permanently , copy the 50-synaptics.conf file to /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d then edit it by adding Option "TapButton1" "1" cp /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf The /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf should be: Section "InputClass" Identifier "touchpad ...


21

In recent systems (2017) as many distros are moving to Wayland, synaptics driver is no longer used. Instead, libinput is used. To enable tap to click on touchpad using libinput create a file in Xorg config: $ touch /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/99-synaptics-overrides.conf And add the following configuration: Section "InputClass" Identifier "touchpad ...


16

Turns out, to enable the touchpad, one has to copy a reference Xorg config snippet: cp /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-synaptics.conf In addition, one can modify the file to set default options for tapping and scrolling. So in fact the "problem" is that touchpads is nowadays handled by libinput, not by synaptics. This ...


14

I've had similar problems and found the answer on this blog to be fairly complete and have copied over the relevant details: Set up palm detection: Turn on palm detection, in a terminal type: $ synclient PalmDetect=1 Set the maximum width that should be interpreted as a finger instead of a palm. I choose 4, most how-tos use 10, it's good to do a bit of ...


12

One way to do it is by adding a file called 10-synaptics.conf in the directory /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d (create the directory if it does not exist). In this file you can put something like Section "InputClass" Identifier "touchpad catchall" Driver "synaptics" MatchIsTouchpad "on" MatchDevicePath "/dev/input/event*" Option "MaxTapTime" ...


12

This does the trick for me in similar situation under Debian 8.6 and LXDE: synclient TapButton1=1 Above works if synaptics touchpad work with Synaptics Driver xserver-xorg-input-synaptics. If you are working with libinput driver (default driver in many live images): xinput set-prop 'SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad' 'libinput Tapping Enabled' 1 You can use ...


12

I also go the model with NFC and the following got both trackpoint and touchpad (with 2-finger scrolling) working: Deleting (or commenting out) the line i2c_i801 from /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf. Adding psmouse.synaptics_intertouch=1 to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=... line in /etc/default/grub (caveat: will be reset and needs to be redone after a ...


10

EDIT: I just got tapping working on my Debian AlpsPS/2 touichpad with synclient: synclient TapButton1=1 I am not an expert on this but found an old synaptics.conf file that I was using on a different laptop: Section "InputClass" Identifier "touchpad catchall" MatchIsTouchpad "on" MatchDevicePath "/dev/input/event*" Option "...


9

This also working for me: synclient tapbutton1=1 If you do not have synclient in your distro (e.g. Kali), apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-synaptics, reboot, then try again. See this answer for a way to keep synaptics settings persistent between reboots. But... As Linux users, we usually trying to fix problems via terminal, digging in text files, and ...


9

I came across https://askubuntu.com/questions/999631/ubuntu-17-10-disable-touchpad-bottom-right-corner-right-click That pointed me in the right direction. Running gsettings list-recursively org.gnome.desktop.peripherals.touchpad lists all touchpad settings. I'm only interested in gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.peripherals.touchpad click-method which ...


7

On my ThinkPad X220T running GNOME 3 it's pretty easy to be typing along and accidentally bump the touchpad, causing some window other than the one you're typing into to be raised. Ostensibly, the solution to this problem is to click your name in the upper right, then click "System Settings", then "Mouse and Touchpad", and then "Disable touchpad while ...


7

Have you tried synaptiks? It's a simple GUI program that always solved any problems with my touchpad configuration. To install: sudo apt-get install kde-config-touchpad Then you should be able to run it with synaptiks && synaptiks (the first synaptiks only puts the icon in the system tray and doesn't launch the GUI for some reason)


7

Most touchpads can be manipulated with the command line tools synclient and xinput. You can read more about both of these command line tools here in the ArchLinux wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Touchpad_Synaptics Of the 2 tools, I do not believe you can disable the uttons using synclient. You may be able to do so using xinput. Of the 2 tools, ...


7

The most common cause of touchpad issues on Arch Linux, including the one you are describing, is not installing the Synaptics touchpad driver. The package is called xf86-input-synaptics Go ahead and run pacman -Syu xf86-input-synaptics and then restart X, and your touchpad should start behaving normally.


6

The trackpad can be disabled from the commandline, similar to what is described here. First, we need the device name or id for Synaptics Trackpad with "xinput list" nostromo ~ $ xinput list ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] ⎜ ↳ Microsoft ...


6

Change the first line in 50-synaptics.conf to Section "InputClass" InputDevice was used to define rules and options for a specific device and I'm not sure if it's still supported. InputClass is a newer section that allows for matching a number of connected devices depending on various match rules. Because you have the line MatchIsTouchpad you should be ...


6

The syndaemon should do the job. It can be found in the package xserver-xorg-input-synaptic. From the man page syndaemon - a program that monitors keyboard activity and disables the touchpad when the keyboard is being used. Disabling the touchpad while typing avoids unwanted movements of the pointer that could lead to giving focus to the ...


5

I found the way to modify the length of time during which the touchpad is disabled while typing. For anyone else out there looking for it here it is : Note: a google search yields the answer quickly enough Just run the program syndaemon -d and add as an option -i wait_time where wait_time is the length of time to wait before re-enabling the touchpad. Other ...


5

If you're using an synaptics touchpad, you can use synclient to fine-tune the config. Use following commands for middleclick on 2 fingers and right on 3 fingers: synclient TapButton2=2 synclient TapButton3=3 The problem: you have to use these commands after each startup, so you should put them in an startup script. I bet there is a way to configure this ...


5

synclient TapButton1=1 works for me.


5

Jason Huggins gave a fantastic talk at PyCon 2012 that described, in great detail, a robot that could play "Angry Birds" on the phone: Worth watching the talk, it was very entertaining. Most importantly, the plans for the hardware and software of the core toolkit, BitBeam, are online in a github repo. I'm sure it would give you a great start.


5

Besides InputClass there also exists a section called InputDevice which takes nearly the exact same options as InputClass. Of course you cannot use the Match* operators but have to give the device's path explicitly: Section "InputDevice" Identifier "touchpad" Driver "synaptics"   Option "Device" "/dev/input/event<X>" Option "MaxTapTime"...


5

When I run either xev or showkey I'm able to get keycodes for Fn+F6. Example When I use showkey -k I get the following on a Thinkpad T410 laptop. $ sudo showkey -k kb mode was ?UNKNOWN? [ if you are trying this under X, it might not work since the X server is also reading /dev/console ] press any key (program terminates 10s after last keypress)... ...


5

Feature is called "Coasting speed". To disable it you can use: xinput --set-prop --type=float "<your device>" "Synaptics Coasting Speed" 0 0 to list devices you can use: xinput list alternative variant (for touchpads) is synclient options (there are 3 of them): CornerCoasting = 0 CoastingSpeed = 0 CoastingFriction = 0


5

The key to disable touchpad while typing doesn't exist anymore in the Gnome registry. First install dconf-editor - sudo dnf install dconf-editor then create a key in dconf editor using this command on terminal. dconf write /org/gnome/desktop/peripherals/touchpad/disable-while-typing true It will create disable-while-typing as key and will set it to ...


5

Editing the grub file from, GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" to, GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="i8042.reset i8042.nomux i8042.nopnp i8042.noloop" then updating grub solved the problem.


5

When you write if [ "some string or other" ] then the [ operator doesn't run some string or other, it just sees a non-empty string and says that is a true value. You want if [ "`synclient | grep TouchpadOff | grep -o -E '[0-9]+'`" ] or the more modern if [ "$(synclient | grep TouchpadOff | grep -o -E '[0-9]+')" ] but there is really no need to see ...


4

I couldn't get only two-finger scrolling to work, but I was able to expand the edge scrolling so it takes over the whole pad. That works for me. Here's what I did: 1) Enable edge scrolling vertically and horizontally, but not "coasting": xinput --set-prop 'SynPS/2 Synaptics TouchPad' 'Synaptics Edge Scrolling' 1 1 0 2) Set the left and right "edges" of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible