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11 votes
Accepted

Understanding top memory bar

The values next to the memory bar show the percentage of used memory (out of the total) and the total memory. For this display, “used” is defined as “total minus available”; 61.8% of 15.2GiB is 9.4GiB,...
Stephen Kitt's user avatar
0 votes

How to interpret the RSan memory?

I try to understand this issue. The statement below does not mean quadrant 3 pages are converted to quadrant 1 type. The page type is not changed, but the underlying kernel-level share is removed. ...
Zachary's user avatar
  • 323
1 vote
Accepted

Continuously monitor a process and all its children with `top`?

Since I've also wanted a similar capability, I wrote a script that does that. The advantage of the script is that top is running continuously, so it actually shows the CPU consumption of the last ...
aviro's user avatar
  • 5,922
2 votes

Continuously monitor a process and all its children with `top`?

What I came up with for my own question, not as nice as the others people have posted: #!/bin/bash # Tested with `top` from `procps-ng 4.0.3` and `pstree 23.6`. # Print the ID of the given process ...
wobtax's user avatar
  • 318
2 votes

Continuously monitor a process and all its children with `top`?

If you don't mind running your program in a different user namespace using unshare, then you can filter in top according to the user namespace. $ unshare -r $ readlink /proc/$$/ns/user user:[...
aviro's user avatar
  • 5,922
3 votes

Continuously monitor a process and all its children with `top`?

Since you mention in a comment that preparing something before you launch the mother process would generally be feasible, and because your example launches a container, which probably already does ...
Marcus Müller's user avatar
2 votes

Continuously monitor a process and all its children with `top`?

There are a number of options. For any visible field, you can filter on that field. An obvious candidate is TTY=pts/*number*. Note that you will need to turn on display of TTY. One initiates this ...
David G.'s user avatar
  • 1,661

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