19

This is the result of the terminal’s input handling: by default, the terminal device driver (software in the kernel of your operating system to handle input from the terminal, not the terminal itself) converts CtrlM to CtrlJ. You can see this by running od -t x1 and then entering both characters: $ od -t x1 ^M ^J ^D 0000000 0a 0a 0000002 (You won’t see ^M ...


5

IF you have GNU du, then send it a list of regular files (or directories, or whatever you want to filter on) using find (or as arguments using shell globs in zsh): find . -type f -print0 | du --files0-from=- du *(.) # zsh, regular non-hidden files in the current directory du by default prints only the sum of the file sizes inside a directory for that ...


5

The most likely explanation for env foo … behaving differently from a plain foo … is that foo is a function or alias. Since env is an external command, it looks up foo as an external command. Here, though, env itself turned out to be an alias. Obviously, if env isn't the standard env command, it might behave differently. this turned out to be a bug in grc ...


3

ffmpeg opens standard input for interactive usage by default. From the docs: -stdin Enable interaction on standard input. On by default unless standard input is used as an input. To explicitly disable interaction you need to specify -nostdin. Disabling interaction on standard input is useful, for example, if ffmpeg is in the background process group. ...


2

$ ncal -bw -b Use oldstyle format for ncal output. -w Print the number of the week below each week column.


2

With awk: awk ' { sub(/<.*/, "") # remove email address $1 = $1 # remove leading and trailing blanks, squeeze all sequences of blanks # into one space if (!seen[tolower($0)]++) print # print if not seen before }' < names.txt


1

You can go the other way around. Ignore the emails: cut -d'<' -f1 names.txt | sort -fu That cuts the line at the < separator, and prints the first field, sorts (ignoring the case -f) and then keeps just the first one of names that only differ in their case (also ignoring the case with -u).


1

This will do it: sed 's_/\*\(.*\)\*/_//\1_' <Test.java The ways it's working is as follows: I'm using the _ as a delimiter so I don't have to escape the / characters '/*' is matched with /\* (escaping the *) I remember the stuff in between the above using \( and \) then replace with '//' (no need to escape) and the remembered content \1 Once you've ...


1

I found the solution by giving it a go one more time. I had to add one function by element I want to display, so I created a function to display time, and another to display history line, with the colors I want. # Display history line prompt_historyline(){ prompt_segment yellow white ' \! ' } # Display time prompt_time() { prompt_segment orange white '...


1

Flash is EOL. You are unlikely to find Adobe's version available anywhere, and even if you do it had a kill-switch to stop it bring used after the death date. You might find a third party reimplementation of Flash, and here are some suggestions that may or may not be Linux-friendly, One effort to preserve, or reimplement Flash was the Gnash project, an open-...


1

iTerm and Kitty support images using their own ad-hock-ish protocols. You can check out their documentation for more details.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible