12

Technically, Ansible is that; because it's agent-less; I've used it to manage routers, switches, servers, etc. What it seems like you're asking for is if the package module supports Arch Linux? I'm too lazy to test if that supports Arch; but if it doesn't there is always the pacman module... And if that doesn't work... There is always writing your own ...


9

Best bet is to use a service like uptime robot. Free tier will cover less than 50 sites, pro plan is quite cheap. It'll do a simple ping check or even HTTP status code check The upshot of this is that you're not adding an additional point of failure (that you can control). You've no longer got to maintain and update a monitoring service


8

I have noticed for some reason (and whether this is true or not, I'm not sure) that Linux is more sensitive to failing hardware. I have seen this on my home office computer a couple of times. Your best bet is to start running hardware diagnostics. For that I would recommend Ultimate Boot CD. In your case, I would start with running a Memtest (at least ...


8

You can use tput. I'm not sure [that tput is] shipped with all major distros It's part of ncurses, and packaged with it on all three of those operating systems and more. Debian list of files in the ncurses-bin package on stable Arch list of files in the ncurses package Fedora description for ncurses package FreeBSD list of files in the ncurses port/...


8

The difference is that apt install php-defaults doesn’t work, because php-defaults is a source package, not a binary package. A source package contains the source code and packaging descriptors used to build one or more binary packages. Source packages aren’t directly installable.


7

Maintaining a meta-package-manager seems to me to be a Sisyphean task, as someone would have to be maintaining some sort of "apache2" in Debian-likes is "httpd" in RHEL-likes (et cetera) Rosetta Stone. However, there is a pacman module for Ansible which is purpose-made for using Ansible (the disto-agnostic management tool you're looking for) to manage ...


6

It’s a good thing that you don’t notice any difference when upgrading the kernel; the Linux kernel is always supposed to be backwards-compatible. Now obviously there are differences. You can get some idea by reading the “human” changelogs on Kernel Newbies; the changes tend to fall under four large headings: security fixes (including fixes for high-profile ...


6

Yes, to a limited extent. But you don't have to. There's a package called unattended-upgrades that will do it for you. Description-en: automatic installation of security upgrades This package can download and install security upgrades automatically and unattended, taking care to only install packages from the configured APT source, and checking for dpkg ...


6

While mcelog does some decoding of the MCA status register, more might be helpful. Step 1 Download the combined Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer Manuals from http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/architectures-software-developer-manuals.html It's massive at 3439 pages. The below refers to the September 2014 version. Step ...


5

Good CI (Continuous Integration) relies on at least three things: Scripted deployment An out of band testing environment Automated tests to cover the entire surface. You currently only have #1. Another VPS could serve as #2 but you don't have any (obvious) testing. But before we go any further, just a quick note in favour of cadence-based releases. ...


4

Well, the seccomp rules prevent a container from modifying the host kernel. Without them, UID 0 in a container can use kexec(if that even works on Raspbian, I'm not sure) to load a new kernel(apparently not to start it) and insmod/rmmod to load/unload modules among other things as these syscalls don't take user namespaces into account correctly. Whether ...


4

First the minimum resolution for cron is 1 minute. So every 15 seconds isn't going to happen. If you really need every 15 seconds then you need to re-think your strategy. Next, cron just runs tasks at a certain time. If the task is resource intensive then it will be in cron as well. If it's not then it won't be. cron adds (almost) NO overhead what so ever, ...


4

To answer the question in the title, no, most system do not experience much of a burden from running cron jobs. Much of the automated tasks that occur on a modern Unix system are kicked off by cron jobs. Things such as rotating logs, and regenerating index files used by man are all kicked off via cron jobs. If you're curious take a look in any of the ...


4

You can use something like this; > cat email_warning.sh #!/bin/bash # # email_warning.sh # UP=true FROM=you@valid.spf TO=you@gmail.com MAX=5 URL="https://$(hostname)/" function doMail { S="$1 $(date)" F=$(echo $S | perl -p0e 's/[\s\t ]+/_/g;s/^(.{122}).*$/$1/g') echo -e "Subject:$S\n\n$S" | sendmail -F $F -f $FROM $TO } function doUP { ...


3

Whether to use a Galaxy-provided role is a decision you need to evaluate in your specific context (for every role you’re considering). Good roles on Galaxy will often handle many more situations than your specific role (look at the contents of tasks here, compared to your playbook), but those capabilities come at a cost: you’re adding an external dependency ...


3

Some possibilities: As Alan suggested, bad memory is a common cause of problems. bad power-supplies can also cause random freezes and crashes. low-quality motherboard. either due to shoddy manufacturing or due to bad/dodgy parts (e.g. a sub-standard or cheap version of a NIC that claims to be a particular brand/model but isn't - the manufacturer's Windows ...


3

Use a journaling file system and make sure the flush to disk frequency is set pretty high. If you are having frequent kernel panics, don't use the machine for anything important! It's broken. Fix it. Remove whatever modules or hardware is a problem before using it in a production environment. If power or other physical issues are present, get a UPS or fix ...


3

Possibly related to Intel Errata HSW131 (or similar) which is spurious and harmless MCA 05 (Internal parity error) errors. Solution: Ignore.


3

Codes (ANSI colour codes) The codes are not distro dependent. They are terminal dependent. Some terminals will not support them. However they are probably supported by most. Names Use variables to give names e.g. red="$(tput setaf 1)" echo "${red}hello" note: don't use capitals for shell variables, capitals should be reserved for environment variables. ...


3

package is Ansible "Generic OS package manager". An option would be to include OS specific list_of_packages - include_vars: "{{ item }}" with_first_found: - files: - "{{ ansible_distribution }}-{{ ansible_distribution_release }}.yml" - "{{ ansible_distribution }}.yml" - "{{ ansible_os_family }}.yml" - "default....


2

The example you give is not just an example. This is a major system upgrade. You better wait for 16.04.1 which is probably more stable. Upgrading from 14.04 to 16.04 is not just an upgrade. If you have 14.04, and it installs a new kernel like 3.2.34 to 3.2.35, you can wait I guess. Well maybe there is a security update in the old kernel, then you can see ...


2

This question has a big chance of getting closed due to the answers you will get are going to be mostly opinion based. But here is my 2 cents. Production systems are reliant on stable releases of operating systems. If you install the latest and greatest kernel/patch/update on your system, you don't know what deficiencies lurk in the short time ahead. I am ...


2

The correct tool to use in this case is called inotify. It is a part of the linux kernel, and its purpose is to notify programs of changes to filesystems. It can be configured in a number of different ways, and is almost certainly suitable for what you are trying to do.


2

Check out the general release schema for Debian systems. And SID(Unstable) in particular: In short: a lot of your software will not work(do you REALLY need the most current software? Especially when it's buggy? If so, you can install it yourself by hand + you can add the previous, more stable release repositories to your /etc/apt/sources.list, compile ...


2

TL;DR Unless you have an uncommon reason, yes, you should have it installed. Long answer The public intel-microcode distribution package is very low-risk, and after the issues with the first round of Spectre fixes, Intel has been even more conservative at pushing fixes to that distribution. That means it is a good second-layer of safety to have it ...


2

Try a hack of the script I built below. My example contains 3 well known hosts and 2 non-existent hosts. pingtest.sh HOSTLIST='www.google.com www.oracle.com www.facebook.com www.sdfafdsfdsf.com www.uieyafbmndhfjsbxcvn.com' BAD_HOSTLIST= for HOST in $HOSTLIST ; do echo $HOST ping -c 3 -w 5 $HOST || BAD_HOSTLIST="$BAD_HOSTLIST $HOST" ...


2

It will not just magically change. When it comes to apache for Debian/Ubuntu/Mint or httpd for Fedora/RHEL/CentOS, updates keep the same name with only the version number changing so the service unit will be the same. If a new release comes out such as apache3, that will be a different package and you'll have to configure and set that one up if you want to ...


2

meta contains meta-data used for the Galaxy registry. .travis.yml contains configuration for Travis CI, which ensures that the project is continuously integrated. The other directories embody the typical structure of an Ansible role: defaults contains the default settings, tasks contains the playbooks, and templates contains the templates for generated files....


2

With most modern Linux distros, the kernel is distributed as a package, just like any other piece of software/library. Therefore, with Ansible as the example, you can have a task such as: - name: Ensure that latest kernel is installed apt: name: linux-image-amd64 state: latest update_cache: yes notify: reboot_server # You would need a ...


2

Nix is a standalone package manager that not tightly bind to any os. I use it on MacOS and also Ubuntu https://nixos.org/nix/ Saltstack (Ansible compatitor) has nicer abstraction with pkg.installed and you don't need to care underlying system is apt or rpm or arch... (still neee to set diff pkg name if they diff on systems, e.g httpd or apache2)


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