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6

Okay, I worked around it on my own. In the option: --graphics spice,port=20001,listen=127.0.0.1 remove the port parameter such that it becomes: --graphics spice,listen=127.0.0.1 You need to configure the <graphics /> element in the libvirt XML configuration file then. My invocation of virt-install gave me this: <graphics type='spice' autoport='...


3

By default Proxmox uses a basic graphics driver for virtual machines. But this isn't very useful for running desktop operating systems as the range of resolutions and other display options is limited. To get more flexibility, you should change your Proxmox VM to use the SPICE protocol. This will allow you a much larger selection of display resolutions, ...


2

I don't know how auto-resize in Virtualbox works, but I also searched for disabling clipboard sharing through Spice on my Linux system. Ivan Kozik's comment above pointed me in the right direction, but did lack some information which i had to gather and want to share: You need to have libvirt package installed to use virsh. Type in terminal: virsh edit NAME ...


2

SPICE is the video, it's a protocol that includes video, sound and control channels for remote access to the qemu process controlling the guest. You can't decouple the sound from the server. If you need to use a passed through video card, you might as well pass the sound card through too.


2

the solution is to tell kvm/virt to use as default an insecure connection. <graphics type='spice' autoport='yes' listen='0.0.0.0' defaultMode='insecure'> <listen type='address' address='0.0.0.0'/> </graphics> Set the defaultMode to insecure and you can use even autoport='yes' and everything is fine. One hint, when you search the port, ...


2

You will need a re-parenting window manager. Your window manager would also need to ensure that the propagation of keyboard events starts from the parent window instead of from the source window (Xlib default).


2

Your repositories appear to be set up correctly (barring the non-free variations, but they don’t matter here), and spice-vdagent is indeed available in Debian 9.9. Based on your analysis of the apt update errors, it turns out that disabling the CD-ROM entry allows apt to update the remote repositories and then find and install spice-vdagent.


2

Edit your QEMU.xml to use the Intel HD audio adapter to work around bug #761031. Open Boxes, perform a full shut down of the virtual machine, and note the auto-assigned name given to the virtual machine. Open up the Terminal and type EDITOR=gedit virsh edit YOURBOXNAME. If you’ve modified the name after installing, you can find the file in ~/.config/...


2

In the live images, there are no repository indexes in the base image, so you need to update first: sudo apt update sudo apt install spice-vdagent


1

Looks like a libvirt bug. It checks for port conflicts using 0.0.0.0, without taking into account the listen address. You can probably work around it by using qemu commandline passthrough to pass a valid -spice arg to qemu that libvirt won't look at. Not very friendly but it's an option if you just want to get something working


1

You could use the LD_PRELOAD trick to override the XGrabKeyboard function from Xlib (or xcb_grab_keyboard from libxcb). Example: $ cat xgkb.c #include <X11/Xlib.h> int XGrabKeyboard(Display *dpy, Window gw, Bool oe, int pm, int km, Time t){ return 0; } $ cc -shared xgkb.c -o xgkb.so $ LD_PRELOAD=`pwd`/xgkb.so your_program Of course, you can ...


1

Quoting xserver-xspice project: A standalone server that is both an X server and a Spice server. Iow, you get a new DISPLAY to launch X clients against, and you can view and interact with them via a spice client. Conversely, x11spice is: x11spice connects a running X server as a Spice server. So the crucial difference is that with xserver-xspice, you ...


1

Not technically an answer to my (slightly XY) question, but Xfreerdp supports multi-monitor RDP quite nicely, and windows guests conveniently come with the server already installed. Here's the commandline I needed to connect to a Windows 10 guest. xfreerdp +nego +sec-rdp +sec-tls +sec-nla /multimon /smart-sizing /v:guestname Warnings: it automatically ...


1

Complementary. qemu-ga handles things like shutdown, rebooting vms, freezing and thawing filesystems (for live backups) spice agent handles device redirection (I think), cutting and pasting in and out of VMs, smooth mouse movement inside vm-viewer, and so on.


1

It is (currently) not possible to let QEMU pick the next free port for SPICE. This happens because of an implementation detail: QEMU uses the spice_server_set_port which only accepts a single numeric parameter. The best you can do now is to pick a port number outside QEMU and assign it as you do now. If you find this too clumsy, consider using DNS to bind ...


1

Yes, the spice client just shows what a monitor would show. The machine continues to run in the background, even if you are not connected via spice. It also doesn't matter which spice client you are using. Of course the qemu process must keep running If you kill that one, it's like "pressing the button".


1

have a look here: http://www.spice-space.org/download.html There is a link to the windows QXL driver, as well as guest tools installer. However, I would recommend enabling RDP on the client and connecting with rdesktop, the performance will be much better.


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