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You could use a lock file to ensure that only one instance of your application runs. Instead of systemctl stop myservice in your launcher, run systemctl restart myservice, and in the 5 seconds it needs to restart the application, start your debug version after acquiriing a lock file: systemctl restart myservice flock /opt/foo/mylock /opt/foo/myapplication --...


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You can run the app within screen or tmux and connect from an "outside" terminal to that very virtual terminal. ExecStart=/usr/bin/screen -d -m -S gunicorn3 /usr/bin/gunicorn3 --workers 3 --bind unix:flaskapp.sock -m 007 app:app --timeout 300 --config /root/flaskapp/gunicorn.conf.py If the app can be started manually then systemd-run with the ...


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You can have systemd do some of the work for you with a second unit B by saying that it Conflicts with the first unit A; then when you start B, it will stop A. Sadly, when B stops, A is not restarted by default, but you can add a OnFailure line; if B exits with a failure, A will be started. To ensure failure in case of normal exit of B you can use an ...


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You can write a unit file in, say, /etc/systemd/system/myprocess.service: [Unit] Description=My Process [Service] ExecStart=/bin/myprocess Restart=always [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target And then in the desktop entry create a launcher to do systemctl start myprocess.service But remember not to enable that service in startup so can you start it ...


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So much to digest. I think I have the answer I need: /etc/services is merely a register of well-known services and official names. It might be directly referenced using getportbyname() but it’s not obligatory. When a dynamic port is request probably for an outgoing port. ip_local_port_range is reference as to allowed port range Some ports can be reserved by ...


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You need to login via ssh as the non-root user and then run the script. sudo -iu docker-user ssh docker-user@hostname (docker-user is an example, use any non root user that exists on the target system)


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Each TCP connection involves not one but two port numbers: a local port and a remote port. On an outgoing connection, the local port number is not important, and most programs let the operating system pick it. As noted by binarysta, the OS will then automatically pick the first free port in the Ephemeral Port Range. But the application (or the user running ...


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in my case systemctl daemon-reexec then service mysql start


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No, the applications request bind to a port but actually it's the operating system that decides to assign a port to an application or not. so for example ports less than 1024 only can be used by root or any user with CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE capability. proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_local_port_range defines the local port range that is used by TCP & UDP traffic to ...


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maybe authorize amos user to launch services thanks to the enable-linger option? loginctl enable-linger amos (cf. man loginctl, it seems to be mandatory)


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Many applications have something known as a well known port number. They will usually bind to it. Other applications will bind to port 0, letting the system choose a free port. Then they communicate their port numbers to eventual clients using other methods (other than well known port numbers). For example broadcasting their availability to the network.


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First find your config you want to change using the following command: systemctl list-unit-files Then change the specific config using the following command: sudo systemctl edit --full tomcat9.service This will open the file in the default text editor set in the EDITOR environment variable. Now add the specific user and group user service section.


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