526

Screen has its own scroll buffer, as it is a terminal multiplexer and has to deal with several buffers. Maybe there's a better way, but I'm used to scrolling using the "copy mode" (which you can use to copy text using screen itself, although that requires the paste command too): Hit your screen prefix combination (C-a / control+A by default), then hit ...


171

Using the screen buffer as pointed out by njsg is a good solution. You can also disable the alternate text buffer in the xterm termcap info inside screen. When disabled you can use the scroll bars (and mouse wheel) to scroll up and down. Add this to your ~/.screenrc. # Enable mouse scrolling and scroll bar history scrolling termcapinfo xterm* ti@:te@ You ...


153

z<CR> or zt puts current line to top of screen (<CR> == Enter) z. or zz puts current line to center of screen z- or zb puts current line to bottom of screen (z<CR>, z., and z- puts the cursor in the first non blank column. zt, zz, and zb leaves the cursor in the current column) More info about scrolling at http://vimdoc.sourceforge....


51

Mouse scrolling and elevators will work if you enable them in your .screenrc. Screen FAQ Q: My xterm scrollbar does not work with screen. A: The problem is that xterm will not allow scrolling if the alternate text buffer is selected. The standard definitions of the termcap initialize capabilities ti and te switch to and from the alternate text ...


42

Filippo Valsorda has a solution for OS X that incorporates iTerm 2, tmux, and mosh. His solution uses a single window/tab to connect to a remote shell. The shell survives disconnects (e.g., connection failure, IP changes, laptop reboots) and supports scrollback with a touchpad, copy-paste, and colors. Caveats are that you must build mosh from source, ...


31

The feature you are talking about is called Auto-Scrolling. It lets you press & hold the middle mouse button and move your mouse to scroll smoothly. In Linux, the default behavior for this action (pressing middle mouse button) is generally used for pasting text. However, there is a preference setting in Firefox and an extension available for Chrome/...


28

All these answers addressed how to navigate within a screen session, but there is a built-in functionality in screen command to store everything in a file through the -L argument according to the manual which reads: -L tells screen to turn on automatic output logging for the windows. so you can do: screen -L -S testscreen and it will create a file ...


27

This is a bit of a complicated question. I'll try to answer your questions in turn, but first a general description: The scrollback buffer is implemented by your terminal emulator (xterm, Konsole, GNOME Terminal). It contains all the text that has been displayed on the screen, including both standard output and standard error from every program you run in ...


26

Shift+PgUp/PgDn/Home/End will scroll in gnome-terminal and Terminal.


26

This Windows feature has never really made its way into the Unix world. In the Unix world, the primary purpose of the middle mouse button is to paste the clipboard content (or more precisely, text selected with the mouse, which is auto-copied). A couple of cross-platform applications such as Firefox and Chrome that support Linux-style middle mouse button ...


24

Turns out this can be done via Firefox preferences. From the pull down menu: Edit --> Preferences Then select the tabs: Advanced --> general Then check "Use autoscrolling" Screenshot    


19

You can use option "-# " to set the number of columns for horizontal scrolling. From man page: -# or --shift Specifies the default number of positions to scroll horizontally in the RIGHTARROW and LEFTARROW commands. If the number specified is zero, it sets the default number of positions to one half of the screen width. Example (set horizontal ...


18

The only horizontal scrolling commands scroll by half a screenful, but you can pass a numeric argument to specify the number of characters, e.g. typing 4 Right scrolls to the right by 4 characters. Less doesn't really have a notion of “current line” and doesn't split a line into words, so there's no way to scroll by a word at a time. You can define a ...


17

I had the same issue on Firefox 48, and this answer worked for me: Create ~/.config/gtk-3.0/settings.ini and add [Settings] gtk-primary-button-warps-slider = false I'm using XFCE, but Firefox is reading that setting for some reason. It also worked with other Gnome 3 applications, such as gnome-todo. After creating that file, I only had to restart ...


16

Ctrl+Shift+Up/Down for gnome-terminal single line up/down


16

On terminals that support setting the scrolling region: tailf() ( # args: <file> [<number-of-header-lines>] trap 'tput csr 0 "$((LINES-1))"' INT tput csr "$((1+${2-1}))" "$((LINES-1))" tput clear { head -n"${2-1}" printf "%${COLUMNS}s\n" "" | tr ' ' = tail -n "$((LINES-1-${2-1}))" -f } < "$1" ) (assumes a shell like zsh ...


15

I use these settings with urxvt in my ~/.screenrc: termcapinfo rxvt-unicode ti@:te@ termcapinfo rxvt ti@:te@ termcapinfo rxvt 'hs:ts=\E]2;:fs=07:ds=\E]2;screen07' Those allow for scrollbar and mouse wheel to do "the right thing™". Note that this is dependent on terminal type, so will not work if your terminal is not of type rxvt. If it doesn't work, try ...


15

The terminal emulation is baked pretty deep into the design of mosh, so, no. Mosh works by having both client and server each maintain its local idea of what the screen currently "looks like", and that requires that the server does terminal emulation. This is how the client is able to refresh the contents of the screen after it has been away for a while and ...


14

Output of the :help scroll-cursor @mtk mentions. Note that there is a difference between zz and z.. Scrolling relative to cursor (scroll-cursor) The following commands reposition the edit window (the part of the buffer that you see) while keeping the cursor on the same line: z<CR> Redraw, line [count] at top ...


12

Perhaps you ran a subshell from an editor, and it left the terminal in the alternate screen. You can test that by tput rmcup which would return to the normal display. While in the alternate screen, some terminals may override the scroll-wheel action by sending up/down cursor escapes.


12

Yes, using J (as in ShiftJ). So you can go to the end of the file with G, then scroll down past the end with J until the last line of the file is at the top of the screen (less won’t let you scroll any further). K and Y do the same at the top of the file, scrolling up past the beginning until the first line is at the bottom of the screen. As David Ongaro ...


11

If you're familiar with vim, this is probably the best option for you. You can enable horizontal-scroll-bind-only by changing 'scrollopt': set scrollopt=hor So with vim -u NONE, you get the desired behavior with: :set scrollopt=hor :set nowrap :1split :windo set scrollbind You may want to adjust 'sidescroll' and 'sidescrolloff' to change how many columns ...


11

You get the old page-up/down behavior via right-clicking on the scroll bar.


9

Putting this in my .tmux.conf file was the trick: set -g history-limit 20000


9

Hold the shift key when attempting to copy and paste when in 'mode-mouse on'


9

multitail has several interactive keys of which b will popup a menu asking you to choose which window to scroll. Use the arrow keys to navigate and press enter to select a window. That window will appear overlaying all the other windows, except for a small border of 2 characters in which you will be able to see any changes. You can scroll this chosen window ...


8

This will work with all your applications without the need of installing anything. Get your input deviceID. In my case (Logitech M315/M235) was 11. xinput list If you want, list available properties with xinput list-props <deviceID>. If you are using libinput (the future/present), almost all properties will start with libinput. For evdev check my ...


8

Type a number, which is the number of columns you want to scroll to, then hit the arrow key. Source: List of useful `less` functions


7

This answer is specific to Logitech devices with Unifying receiver, but you're mentioning one explicitely in your question. Install solaar, a tool which can be used to pair devices with the unifying receiver, but also provides basic device configuration (and status information like battery level). Select the mouse, disable "Smooth Scrolling".


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