New answers tagged

0

The real problem seems to be that the package you are trying to remove wasn't actually installed: Preparing... ########################################### [100%] package custom-linux-9026-10.0.0-BUILD116.noarch is already installed And the package name seems to be custom-linux-9026-10.0.0-BUILD116.noarch.


0

I think after the update you have damage on .so you can find the package it belongs to: yum provides \*/librpm.so.3 In my case, I don't have librpm but i have libgcc_s.so.1 so: $ yum provides \*/libgcc_s.so.1 [...] libgcc-8.3.1-5.el8.0.2.x86_64 : GCC version 8 shared support library Repo : @System Matched from: Filename : /lib64/libgcc_s.so.1 [...]...


0

I guess that the dependency resolver chose the former as he does not need to upgrade two packages ( libgcc, libgomp). If you run the same command with --best I guess you will get the same result as with the later run.


2

are RPM Fusion packages trustworthy and safe to install? By trustworthy, what I mean is in term of security and privacy not tampered with to include malicious code or behavior. Or does anybody checks the upstream code to make sure it's safe? As far as tampering goes, there are two aspects to consider. The first is the relationship between the installable ...


0

This line works fine for me zypper search --installed-only --repo yourbadrepo|awk {'print $3'}|xargs sudo zypper rm If you want to risk or use in a script, the -n option avoid confirm(can break deps) zypper search --installed-only --repo yourbadrepo|awk {'print $3'}|xargs sudo zypper -n rm


Top 50 recent answers are included