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Here's how a switch works: The switch has several network ports, and those are connected point-to-point to a NIC on a computer. If the NIC can do 25 GB/s, that means that the point-to-point connection will use a protocol that does 25 GB/s. Now with a dumb switch, that would also mean that the incoming connection routed to that NIC is restricted to 25 GB/s. ...


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As far as I know those are not logged. Unless somebody else proves me wrong, here's an alternate method. What you can do instead is steps 1+2 or 1+3 below: disable rp_filter completely. use iptables' rpfilter match module, once with the LOG target for simple log, or NFLOG (or even NFQUEUE though that's not the intended usage) for full packet dump, and once ...


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ifmetric will allow you to change your route metric on the fly.


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I think the discussion in the comments to the other answer deserve their own answer: First, while you can list the routing table with ip route or route -n and work out yourself what's likely going to happen, it's easier to just ask the kernel with ip route get a.b.c.d to go through the routing tables (yes, there's more tables in a modern Linux system, and ...


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On Linux you can adjust the routing rules using ip rule and ip route commands. The latter one is a more advanced equivalent for the route command. In your case you might obtain the desired behavior by having a separate routing table where the default gateway on wlan0 interface is the only (or anyway preferred) default gateway present, and then set a routing ...


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Check your route table with below command, here Metric column normally decide what is the routing priorities, $ route -n Kernel IP routing table Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface 0.0.0.0 10.42.0.2 0.0.0.0 UG 50 0 0 eth1 0.0.0.0 10.42.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 100 ...


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Basically, the routing code goes through the whole routing table and for each row in the table, it takes note of the rows where (destIP & netmask) == destination). There can be zero to N matches. If there is more than one, the "most specific" route is chosen, i.e. the one with the most one bits in the netmask. If no route matches (in the case there is no ...


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First of all, the Network Code selects the correct Interface for the packet to be sent out. It then applies a corresponding source ip address. In your case, the Interface will presumably be one with an address of 192.168.16.X Since you obviously applied the mask '255.255.240.0' to your Interface br0, this would be the outgoing Interface. But pay ...


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