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There is no way to completely stop root from reading or modifying a file or directory. root can do those things even without any permissions and ACLs can be modified and removed by root. This would also be the case if permissions did stop root from reading or modifying the the file because root could just change the permissions or ownership. The file could ...


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No. Traditionally root is all-powerful, can read/write whatever she likes, regardless of permissions. That is the whole point: be omnipotent as the "owner" of the system. There are ways using non-Unix permission models (like SELinux) to divide up permissions, but that isn't "Unix" per se.


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I've made an ugly script to somewhat emulate gksudo tested on Fedora 31 works with Alt+F2 Usage ~$ wsudo [cmd] (default is gnome-terminal) code Place the following code in /usr/local/bin/wsudo. You also need to install the gtkdialog package #!/bin/bash [ -z $GTKDIALOG ] && GTKDIALOG=gtkdialog MAIN_DIALOG=' <window> <hbox> &...


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Answering the question as asked (others have commented about if this is desirable). Change the ~root/.ssh/authorized_keys to prepend environment="RUSER=Chris" before Chris's key, environment="RUSER=Pete" before Pete's key and so on. Lines should look something like environment="RUSER=Pete" ssh-rsa AAAAB[snipped] pete@somewhere Edit the sshd config file (...


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If you're just restoring the tar to pull data out and/or investigate, you don't need to restore it in the same place it was on the original system. tar -C /path/to/restore/dir -xf /path/to/archive


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It may be due to him tar gzipping things like /proc/kcore (which is entire system memory) and other things in /proc and /dev. Which take no space in linux (as they are virtual FSes), and have 0 size when compressed, but when you untar them, they probably take one filesystem block each. I would suggest installing Windows linux subsystem. And using something ...


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You can end up in emergency mode if you botch fstab. It REQUIRES the root password to continue ... so it would be nice to know the root password, unless you've set it with passwd. You are in emergency mode. After logging in, type "journalctl -xb" to view system logs, "systemctl reboot" to reboot, "systemctl default" or ^D to try again to boot into default ...


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