23

The xfreerdp protocol changed how to connect. Try the following example: xfreerdp +clipboard /u:<username> /v:<hostname> /size:<WxH> Also, if it is necessary to connect over a different port, add /p: <port> after the <hostname> parameter.


18

FreeRDP (xfreerdp, whose Debian package name is freerdp-x11) is considerably less used than rdesktop according to the Debian Popularity Contest stats, in part because it is so much newer: #rank name inst vote old recent no-files (maintainer) 1429 rdesktop 56497 4281 41399 10775 42 (Laszlo Boszormenyi) 3056 freerdp-x11 14232 ...


13

The trick is putting the password switch at the end of your command line so that you can leave it blank. This will trigger xfreerdp to prompt your for the password instead of having to provide it via the command line. Example new cli interface (v1.1+) $ xfreerdp /v:farm.company.com /d:company.com /u:oshiro /g:rds.company.com /p old cli interface (v1.0.2) ...


12

There are multiple versions of RDP protocol: original 4.0, which is a clone of ITU-T T.128 protocol 5.0 - which is still used by rdesktop (and not even fully) 5.1, 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, 7.0, 8.1 and 8.1 As you can imagine, each new version of RDP is better, not only by introducing new features, but also by further improving performance and overall user experience....


11

Assuming your college's computer runs all the time: Use GNU Screen or tmux and live happily ever after. Apparently, xpra offers that, i.e. it attempts to be "Screen for X11". (I've never used it, though.) (There're other solutions for (1.), e.g. nohup and IO redirection, but Screen probably is the canonical tool for these kinds of issues. (You can then ...


10

I had a user with the same problem and after trying Sjaak's solution he still couldn't log in so on a whim I did a ps -ef|grep vnc and found a process with the users UID so I killed that process and had the user try again and login was successful.


9

If I understand you right: you want to share gnome or other environment remotely as it is, then the easiest way to achieve this is to use x11vnc. It shares real X11 server as it is after user logged in: x11vnc -display :0 Or if you want vnc server run after login, you can automate with this script: #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/x11vnc -nap -wait 50 -noxdamage -...


8

XDMCP is designed for this. On your server, you need to enable XDMCP support in your desktop manager: if you're using kdm, look for [Xdmcp] Enable=false at the end of your kdmrc, change false to true and restart kdm; if you're using lightdm, add [XDMCPServer] enabled=true port=177 to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and restart lightdm. Then on your client, ...


7

If your remote client is running Windows, you can enable X11 forwarding in PuTTY and install an X server for Windows such as Xming. This allows your Linux GUI applications to integrate with the Windows desktop, appearing as normal, locally-rendered windows. If your remote client is Linux, you can just use ssh -X.


6

My favorite method for remote connections is to use vino. It's similar to x11vnc, but I find it much easier to set up (though I'm typically using a GUI). With Vino enabled, gnome is set up to accept vnc connections for the active session (the one that is currently logged in), for every boot. Any windows or applications open on the screen will be viewable ...


6

I'd like to expand on slm's solution. I wanted a single window to enter all information in and allow me to specify a RemoteApp all in one go, so I built on what he suggested with zenity and created this. XFreeRDP Prompt Code: #!/bin/bash # XFreeRDP RemoteApp W/ Prompt Script # Version 0.3 # Description: # XFreeRDP Remote App Script utilizing Zentity to ...


6

From the command line you can issue the following commands: to run the service: /usr/NX/bin/nxserver --start to check if it is running: /usr/NX/bin/nxserver --status Source: http://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/392935-remote-linux-desktops-with-nomachine-nx


6

For anyone coming to this: Among all rdp clients out there, which i tried, when connecting to windows server on azure, all worked except rdesktop which seems to have problem with recent protocol version. See here https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1075697 → uninstall! freerdp (xfreerdp on debian) rocks. Check their github https://github.com/...


5

You can run both a VNC server and VNC viewer on the home computer, X-forwarding the VNC viewer through the SSH connection. It's VNC, but you don't need any additional software on the Cygwin/X side and everything is still secured over SSH: cygwin$ ssh -X home home$ x11vnc -display :0 & home$ xtightvncviewer localhost:0


5

This is similar to, though not an exact duplicate of, question 11623. Moving applications between X displays is possible; have a look at xmove, guievict, or xpra.


5

As it turns out, rdesktop-vrdp is bundled within the Virtualbox installation, so even though it was working before the upgrade, it has stopped working. That's not the right rdesktop tool anyways. The right tool is available through the package manager yum install rdesktop Solution: Stop using rdesktop-vrdp and start using rdesktop.


5

It really depends on what exactly you want to end up with. If you want multiple people connecting to your computer watching what you are doing, then exporting the X session through VNC should do it. You can either run a separate "headless" server (rendering into RAM frame buffer instead of a graphical card memory) or even export your current session with ...


5

I found the best option was to upgrade freerdp following these guidelines: In Terminal: $ cd /usr/src $ git clone git://github.com/FreeRDP/FreeRDP.git $ cd FreeRDP $ sudo aptitude install libcunit1-dev libdirectfb-dev xmlto doxygen \ libxtst-dev libavutil-dev libavcodec-dev build-essential git-core \ cmake libssl-dev libx11-dev libxext-dev ...


5

To take control of a running X session you will need to configure your VNC server to connect to the same display as X. Generally, X will be connected to the first display - :0. You will also need the X Authority for that X session. This can be found by accessing the X Authority file that the remote Display Manager is using. This depends on your Display ...


5

I was hit with the same issue. You should be able to use: yum install xrdp --enablerepo=cr to get around this for now as the xorg-x11-server-Xorg(x86-64) = 1.20.1 packages should be available in the continuous release repo.


4

The resources are stored in the X server - this is to prevent need for distributing the configuration files across several computers. .Xresources was never meant to be read by the applications, it is loaded into the X server with xrdb (although the situation is slightly more unclear when it comes to the older .Xdefaults, AFAICT). See wikipedia article for ...


4

iTALC lets you monitor and control several computers in a classroom environment. It might do what you need. I'm not sure about showing a student's screen on all others, though. There is also LanSchool, Nettop, and NetSupport Assist, all of which are commercial solutions. If none of those are what you're looking for, you might want to take a look at ...


4

I would use the application Vinagre. You invoke it from the command line like so: $ vinagre There is also a applet that should be available when you install it so that you can just pick machines that you've bookmarked with it form a pulldown when you add the applet to your toolbar.


4

Well, asides from the obvious security holes that VNC causes (seriously, key stokes are sent unencrypted so anyone in the middle can grab a password), you're going to want to make sure that you have to adjust your firewall which is in: Applications -> Firewall -> Enter your root password -> Services -> vnc-server Enable it, quit, and make sure that vnc is ...


4

(Now I said this was too broad but here's one possible solution). Have a server on the internet (eg a linode or similar) with a static IP address. This server should be an openvpn server. Your daughter's laptop should initiate an openvpn connection to this server. You can do this at boot time, even before she logs in. You can configure openvpn so her ...


4

If a person that you do not trust (no matter who this may be) has or has had administrator rights on the system, you may treat this as a compromised system. A compromised system "does not belong to you", as in "you don't know what may be running on it or what changes has been made to it". You should reinstall the machine from scratch, making sure to first ...


4

There's a bug about this; apparently it happens because xorgxrdp is missing. Using the Xvnc backend as a workaround worked for me: Install tigervnc: # apt-get install tigervnc* When connecting to the remote desktop, choose "Xvnc" as the session type.


3

You can try to use VNC X server. It uses non-privileged port to communicate and it may be run without any root privileges. To avoid the building of VNC find out what port of it the distro being in use contains (there is a number of options TigerVNC, OpenVNC, RealVNC, e.t.c.). For example the Fedora 17 has tigervnc-server-minimal package that has ...


3

tightvnc is designed to present an independent session. What you want is something like the vnc server extension for xorg which exports the running console X11 session via RFB. It is packaged for a number of Linux distributions (try the vnc4server package on Debian or Ubuntu). The X11VNC package can also do it and is considerably more flexible, although ...


3

Are you wanting to view the entire desktop remotely? That would require something like VNC. If you are just wanting to view one application that has a GUI, you will need to install something like xming and enable X forwarding. Both of these, especially the VNC resuires a very large amount of bandwidth, and I wouldn't recommend it over the internet unless ...


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