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6

Just wanted you to know that I found a solution to avoid the now famous "30 seconds wait" ;-) I have a Mid-2012 MacBook Air. I tried all your mentionned solutions to speed up the boot under Yosemite, but the best one to me was to change the refind folder name on the EFI partition, and also rename the refind file. So, it gives : By security, I added all ...


5

I'm going to reanswer my own question here because there is now an official solution from rEFInd, and thus I believe this is the right way to go about this. The official guidelines can be found on the rEFInd web site. Following are the steps presented there: Boot to OS X, using whatever means is available to you. Holding Option (or Alt) while powering up ...


5

I fixed the issue by simply adding the --alldrivers when installing refind. Yosemite dual boot works now like before. Fast, and everything is reconized in the refind boot menu. install.sh --alldrivers


5

Looking at the drive with gdisk renders: root@ubuntu-mate:~# gdisk /dev/sda GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.1 Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not present APM: not present GPT: present Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT. Command (? for help): v Warning: The 0xEE protective partition in the MBR is marked as active. This is ...


5

The problem appears to be that rEFInd isn't automatically creating the refind_linux.conf file in the /boot directory. From step 4 of the "EFI Stub Loader Support Technical Details" from the rEFInd documentation: rEFInd looks for a file called refind_linux.conf in the same directory as the kernel file. It consists of a series of lines, each of which ...


3

According to man(1) bootctl: bootctl remove removes all installed versions of systemd-boot from the EFI system partition, and removes systemd-boot from the EFI boot variables. In addition to running bootctl remove, you can manually remove /boot/loader, the directory containing all of the configuration files for systemd-boot.


2

The dont_scan_dirs list is a list of directories to skip when looking for efi files. Excluding a directory does not appear to exclude the entire tree at that point. Directories under an excluded one are still searched, just efi files in that explicitly named directory are ignored. To solve the issue you'll need to include the directories that have the efi ...


2

The solution is to prevent rEFInd to scan for bootloaders automatically, and to only keep the manually defined entry menus. In refind.conf, uncomment and modify the following line: scanfor external,optical,manual (I removed the internal scanning)


1

Per the rEFInd Documentation, the default_selection option is used to set the default operating system to boot. Sets the default boot OS based on the loader's title, which appears in the main menu beneath the icons when you select the loader. By default, the rEFInd configuration file should be located at either /boot/efi/EFI/Microsoft/Boot/refind.conf, ...


1

Disabling the BIOS-level Fast Boot feature is only necessary to get enough time to access BIOS/UEFI boot menus, as @kemotep mentioned in question comments. If you're using rEFInd as your boot menu, that is not typically required, as rEFInd has an adjustable timeout and it can also provide you a boot menu option for accessing the firmware settings (aka "...


1

I clicked the wrong option. I clicked the far left option instead of the one in the middle. I advise anyone that's doing this to not follow the Kali Linux guide on their website because it's wrong and outdated as I found out the hard way thanks for all your help. I'm afraid the problem was my own stupidity


1

On a removable disk, it would be best to copy/rename the bootloader (refind.efi) as /tmp/usbboot/EFI/boot/bootx64.efi (using pathnames as in quixotic's instructions). This is a special filename that UEFI firmware looks for: if it exists, then the disk will be detected as UEFI-bootable. If you use any other path or filename for your bootloader, then you'll ...


1

An EFI System Partition is simply a FAT32-formatted partition (with the ESP boot flag set on GPT partition tables). Some UEFI systems will happily load bootloaders from a FAT32 partition on a standard MBR partition. It looks to me like you've created it properly, but lacks formatting. Once formatted, you'll "install" rEFInd there by copying the rEFInd ...


1

Firstly, those white MacBook models are supposed to only have a 32-bit EFI; the transition to 64-bit EFI was only made in the first Macbook "Pro" aluminum models (and not in the first batches). My memory can be betraying me here. (I owned a black one, and "owned" two whites ones at my job, also the first aluminium one, and nowadays an i5 from 2012 at job, ...


1

The files /.VolumeIcon.icns and /.VolumeIcon.png on the partition with elementary OS are overwriting the theme icon. You need to rename or remove those files to get it working.


1

I figured out a workaround for using rEFInd in Yosemite, but please note that it is probably not the best solution. I think the reason of rEFInd is no longer working under Yosemite is because the root partition of the system does not reside in a physical partition any more, thus rEFInd will not be able to be recognized at the boot stage. So, I tried install ...


1

I installed the rEFind boot loader again in Mas os and restart, it works fine then.


1

Somewhere in /boot, probably (not sure about Mint), or else on your esp at least, you'll find a file called refind.conf. You'll want to edit to edit that to include the line: timeout -1 Sets the timeout period in seconds. If 0, the timeout is disabled—rEFInd waits indefinitely for user input. If -1, rEFInd will normally boot immediately to the ...


1

Yes it does, because rEFInd doesn't work because of corestorage. The entire disk, that means all partitions, is/are managed as a single volume, and rEFInd is lost in this "several partitions on multiple drives as a single logical volume". So you have to choose between corestorage performance, or rEFInd. Your options: install rEFInd into an another HFS ...


1

MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009), Yosemite 10.10, have Whole-Disk Encryption (FileVault) enabled. Have installed rEFInd like that: ./install.sh --esp --alldrivers mkdir /Volumes/ESP sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/ESP And in refind/refind.conf I've located dont_scan_volumes directive and made it look like: dont_scan_volumes foo,bar rEFInd boots ...


1

Actually the link provided by Samantha seems to give the easiest solution: diskutil list and you will see something like: $diskutil list /dev/disk0 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *251.0 GB disk0 1: EFI ...


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