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SOLUTION I couldn't find a solution with an already created RAID 1 configuration, so backup your data, because for this solution I'll give you'll need to delete your RAID 1 first. Actually, I just deleted the virtual machine I was working with and created a new one. So this it's going to work with Debian 10, and with a clean machine Create a new clean ...


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RAID1 doesn't write any additional integrity data. So it's unable to detect when a disk has silently corrupted data, except via comparing both copies. Even then, it has no way to know which copy (if any) is correct. RAID1 handles full-disk failure and can correct non-silent data corruption, where the drive signals the error by reporting an unreadable sector ...


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It all depends on how you set it up. With ten disks in RAID 1, you get a single disk capacity, with plenty of redundancy: if any 9 disks fail, the data is still there on the single remaining disk. This sounds weird but sometimes you see it as a mdadm RAID 1 for the /boot partition, while everything else is RAID 5/6/10 - which the bootloader might not know ...


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This is a very common problem with old mdadm 0.90 metadata. This metadata is located somewhere at the end of the device, but not in the very last sector but at a 64K-aligned offset: The superblock is 4K long and is written into a 64K aligned block that starts at least 64K and less than 128K from the end of the device (i.e. to get the address of the ...


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Please check the mirror segment type with lvs -o name,segtype: if it's raid1, it should be safe to reboot if you must, although you might lose some progress. If the segment type is the legacy mirror, the same will apply to you only if there is a separate on-disk mirror log segment in use. This mirror type includes a --mirrorlog setting with several options: ...


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ZFS really doesn't support what you want to do. It's possible to wrestle it into doing what you want, but you're fighting the intended use all the way in doing so. It's worth keeping in mind that ZFS is an enterprise file system and volume manager solution. In an enterprise environment, no matter which way one goes about it, the added complexity of what you ...


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Fault Tolerance is the phrase to use in your search; my search revealed OpenZFS has block-level cryptographic checksumming to accurately find corrupt data, BtrFS checksums on data and metadata (crc32c), and Microsoft ReFS with metadata checksumming. Replace HDDs with more reliable SSDs is another good idea. Combine those with disk mirroring (the ...


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It's a miracle. Somehow I got the array back up and running. Here's what I did: As mentioned in the original post, the system wasn't shutting down because it was still trying to write something to the faulty drive. I followed the advice of user361233 and pulled the plug. I stopped panicking. With the computer shut off, I could think about the next ...


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Sorry, I did not intend my earlier comment as a chastisement, but more to raise awareness of the trap of using hardware RAID in small-scale settings. You're not the first one who has ended up in a bad situation like that, and I'm afraid you won't be the last one either. I was against comment length limit, so it ended up harsher than needed. dmraid supports ...


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I set up a quick test on a RAID 1 array built from two loop devices. dd bs=1M count=100 if=/dev/zero >/tmp/0.img cp /tmp/0.img /tmp/1.img i0=$(losetup --show --find /tmp/0.img); echo $i0 i1=$(losetup --show --find /tmp/1.img); echo $i1 mdadm --create /dev/md99 --metadata default --level 1 --raid-devices 2 $i0 $i1 Setting one half faulty mdadm --manage /...


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It has been documented kernel behaviour for many years now that you can not rely on consistent device naming for drives even across reboots on the same server, let alone on different servers. You will have to write your auto-RAID setup script to detect which drives are in the system and distinguish between the root SSD and the storage JBOD drives. One ...


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ddrescue did successfully copy from the drive with bad sectors to the one that was disabled from the array back in November, however, only after I replaced my power supply. In /var/log/kern.log I saw hundreds of failed WRITE FDMA QUEUE commands, so pulled the PSU from a newer machine and after the transplant, ddrescue worked fine. Took about 10 hours for ...


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Well, the lazy option would be to just take the current configuration in stride, add /dev/sdd to LVM as is, and let LVM itself handle the RAID for you. That means mdadm isn't involved at all (not directly, anyway). See Romeo's answer, it's a good one. If you want to use mdadm, although it's not impossible to do this belatedly (using version 1.0 metadata at ...


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You can create mirror volumes by adding sdd to VG pvcreate /dev/sdd vgextend DATA /dev/sdd and then change the number of copies of each LV lvconvert -m1 DATA/user_data lvconvert -m1 DATA/app_data (1 mean two copies of data, 0 mean one copy) You can check the progress of mirroring by command like: lvs -a -o name,copy_percent,devices DATA


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Let me say straight up that I'm not familiar with Snap RAID. If you want to involve LVM, you need to know that it allows you to coalesce different physical volumes (PV) to create a single volume group (VG). So if Snap RAID lets you create multiple protected spaces you can put a PV on each and then amalgamate them into the one VG that can contain a Logical ...


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Before I start replacing either the drives or the board I'm wondering if there is there anything else I can check? CentOS 7.6 on my home pc, asrock lga1156. Had NVidia graphics drivers installed support gtx970, did a kernel update... as you many know the nvidia install does a kernel mod which is lost [unless you use dkms]. As such, after my kernel update I ...


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On Ubuntu 18.04, this worked: AUTO -all ARRAY <ignore> UUID=00000000:00000000:00000000:00000000 Nothing was auto-assembled after that point.


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Based on jofels answer, here is the same example but without having to store the key in a file. The key is passed in a named pipe, which doesn't store anything to disk. You can use /lib/cryptsetup/scripts/decrypt_derived in your crypttab to automatically use the key from one disk for another. The decrypt_derived script is part of Debian's cryptsetup package....


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