13

If groff and gropdf exists on your Linux system, you should be able to use man -Tpdf man >man.pdf (note the absence of a space between -T and pdf) On an Ubuntu system, it should be enough to install the groff package to get access to gropdf. The option argument to -T is passed on to groff and groff will use its -T option with the same option argument. ...


11

In general, you can use open from the terminal to open any file with its default application (see this SO question). open is Mac OS-specific. On GNU/Linux, the equivalent is usually xdg-open. Also, for your reference, you can try to find out what type of file a file really is (regardless of its extension) using the file command.


9

Use a command like: gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -dSAFER -sOutputFile=sin_800.pdf *.eps


9

Make sure you have ghostscript package installed: sudo apt-get install ghostscript You would need to convert the postscript to the PDF; for the command last that would be: man -t last | ps2pdf - last.pdf


8

I need to create a script or reuse a script that converts PDF to PS (Post Script) files There are tools but there are also pros and cons for each tool. pdf2ps is my go to tool since my needs are pretty low. It is a simple one line command. pdf2ps [options] input.pdf [output.ps] if you don't give a output.ps it will keep the input file name and just ...


8

Solved it. The pages were being rendered on the computer because I had chosen a LaserJet driver from the Hewlett-Packard section of the CUPS printer management interface, implemented using Gutenprint. This worked fine for B&W text but poorly for color areas. After still not seeing a "PostScript" option in the configurator, I chose "Raw", and this works: ...


6

Files with the .eps extension are usually encapsulated postscript. You can view them with gv: gv t-0.8.eps Or with your favorite PDF viewer: evince t-0.8.eps Or even with an image editor gimp t-0.8.eps


5

You could use the open source software Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com). It is available for OSX, Windows, and Linux. Input Formats: CBZ, CBR, CBC, CHM, DJVU, EPUB, FB2, HTML, HTMLZ, LIT, LRF, MOBI, ODT, PDF, PRC, PDB, PML, RB, RTF, SNB, TCR, TXT, TXTZ Output Formats: AZW3, EPUB, FB2, OEB, LIT, LRF, MOBI, HTMLZ, PDB, PML, RB, PDF, RTF, SNB, ...


4

Some people have had success with png2eps. Remember that whatever system you use to convert PNG to EPS it will be a tradeoff between image quality and file size. PNG is a compressed bitmap format while EPS is uncompressed vector graphics - the two formats couldn't be more different. There is no resolution in a vector image until you attempt to convert it ...


4

You need to tell groff which macros you want to use. In this case, you want groff -ge -me -mwww grnexmpl.me > out.ps If you want to see the picture of the circuit diagram, you'll also need grnexample.g present in the directory. I found this by running grog to guess the macros, and then added the www macro, since I could see there was HTML in the source ...


3

You should check out LPRng (packaged as lprng in Debian); it supports remote printing using JetDirect (which is the protocol used over port 9100), with an /etc/printcap file like remote :lp=192.168.0.6%9100 where remote is the name your printer is given locally. See the documentation for details and caveats, and the Debian package's documentation too. ...


3

If it's a PostScript printer, surely the raw printer output is already PostScript...? Basic PostScript is human-readable. Take a look at the start of the file and see if it starts with %! or %!PS-2 or similar...


3

In my experience the better way to manipulate PDF is via Inkscape. If the PDF is well structured (not true everytime...) you can select the elements and manipulate them, like zooming or changing the font size: (This example is from a not-so-well-behaved PDF, though).


3

From my past experiences with a2ps, it doesn't handle wrapping in an intelligent manner. So you have to present your text file already formatted to the proper width & wrapping, before handing it off to a2ps. If your system has enscript installed I'd make use of that instead. Googleing for "word wrap a2ps" will lead you to this article titled: Printing ...


3

Rather than scanning all AFM files looking for the name of the given font, enscript only scans the font.map text file. This file is a simple two-column ASCII file where each line has the format FontName filename. If you place the AFM file in enscript's afm directory (on my system it's located at /usr/share/enscript/afm) and then add a line in the font.map ...


2

I have struggled with this as well but have found an answer that works for me. It's a two-step process: fmt inputfile.txt > outputfile.txt a2ps outputfile.txt Of course that can happen all on one line: fmt inputfile.txt > outputfile.txt; a2ps outputfile.txt And if you like you can also rm the outputfile.txt. I've done this several times now and ...


2

Cedilla is a text-to-postscript converter, similar to enscript and a2ps, with good Unicode support but a lot fewer configuration possibilities. I don't think Cedilla can to multi-column. If you want fine control over the formatting, you can use LaTeX. LaTeX's support for going beyond 8 bits is a bit problematic, but tools now exist to typeset Chinese fairly ...


2

This is the pseudo solution I used, now. My editor didn't seem to care whether to receive eps or tiff files, so I rendered all svgs with the target resolution and size, as it was impossible to get a decent result with eps files (as noted in the comments this is due to technical limitations of the eps format). This can be done by opening the svg directly in ...


2

You probably need to provide just a single file for lpr to print. If your files are encapsulated PostScript, perhaps all you need to do is concatenate them with an intervening showpage command: for f in figure[0-9]; do cat "$f"; echo 'showpage'; done | lpr -o number-up=4


2

If you want to use the FAM string to specify a font family you will need to use conventional names with the suffixes R B I BI for roman, bold, italic, and bold-italic. In the linked-to example, the font family was DejaVuSans, so you need to provide fonts DejaVuSansR, DejaVuSansB, DejaVuSansI, and DejaVuSansBI. The following worked for me: mkdir -p /tmp/font/...


2

There have been 2 efforts to make an emulator that I'm aware of. Rbuss was a project to emulate NeWS on the original Sun hardware. And my own project xpost was intended to be a clone of NeWS. But it's an immense undertaking. After 5 years, I almost got the IPC mechanisms working for multitasking, but never got events or window classes implemented. For ...


2

pdfjam, a tool that comes in TeX distributions like Texlive, will do the trick. The command will be pdfjam -o cover.pdf --papersize '{17.25in,11.25in}' --noautoscale true --nup 2x1 cover-page.pdf '{},1' pdfjam relies on the LaTeX pdfpages package. By default it puts one input page per output page, scales input to fit the paper, and centers it. Here, --nup ...


2

The date is set in the source code for the man page -bash-4.2$ man -w man /usr/share/man/man1/man.1.gz -bash-4.2$ zcat $(man -w man) | fgrep 2012 .TH MAN 1 "2012-09-17" "2.6.3" "Manual pager utils" -bash-4.2$ Not portably, as OpenBSD for example instead places the date in .Dd $ man -w man /usr/share/man/man1/man.1 /usr/share/man/man7/man.7 $ grep 2017 $(...


2

Seems you might need to install HPLIP proprietary driver plugin: https://developers.hp.com/hp-linux-imaging-and-printing/models/laserjet/hp_laserjet_400_mfp_m425dn


1

psmerge and psnup from psutils should do what you want. psmerge figure[0-9].eps | psnup -4 | lpr From the Description field in the Debian packaged version: Description-en: PostScript document handling utilities This collection of utilities is for manipulating PostScript documents. Page selection and rearrangement are supported, including ...


1

Welp, that didn't take long for me to give up. Some goofing around led me to the following conclusions: PS driver does not support manual duplex where the printer display prompts you, PCL v4 driver in Windows does. Dell doesn't offer those drivers in Linux flavor, and I don't know enough about PCL drivers to attempt any conversions. Strangely, the auto-...


1

If you have a ps document with 16 A7 pages, you can imposition the folder with the following command: pstops -pa4 '16:0R(0,0.25h)+15R(0,0.5h)+12R(0,0.75h)+3R(0,1h)+7L(1w,0)+8L(1w,0.25h)+11L(1w,0.5h)+4L(1w,0.75h),2L(1w,0.75h)+13L(1w,0.5h)+14L(1w,0.25h)+1L(1w,0)+5R(0,1h)+10R(0,0.75h)+9R(0,0.5h)+6R(0,0.25h)' input.ps output.ps Some notes on the command: 16: ...


1

From: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3403485/pdf-to-ps-conversion Apparently there is a utility called pdf2ps (part of ghostscript) which can do this. There is also another utility called pdftops (part of xPDF) which can do the same.


1

CUPS is the printing system under Linux. In particular, it provides a server and clients. The lp and lpr are two common commands to print files: lpr is the BSD one, and lp the System V one. There exist various implementations (more or less compatible with the original commands), but nowadays they should be CUPS clients. You should check that with dlocate or ...


1

If it is some non-postscript printer, you are out of luck. PostScript is a page description language, which describes curves by curves. The raw input to the printer is most probably some raster format. In the best case you'll get a pixelated rendering of the image. Or ir might be some somewhat higher level language, but Im' not aware of any reverse ...


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