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For the wireshark option: Make sure usbmon is running sudo modprobe usbmon Run wireshark sudo wireshark # may or may not requiring sudoing Identify the correct USB interface (usbmonX) and start the capture In the top menu, Statistics --> I/O Graph Filter the display for the USB packets (or just leave empty to measure all USB packets) Set Y Axis to ...


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You can create tmpfs and copy your executable to it $ sudo mount -t tmpfs -o size=10M tmpfs /mnt/mytmpfs


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I guess it creates a huge read burden on my hard disk in a long term. No it does not unless you're reading and writing tons of data from/to the disk. Linux uses caching for all read/write operations, so once (having been) run, your binary will be cached and subsequently the kernel will use its image in the cache memory and won't read the file from the disk.


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Parts of the kernel which are not applicable to your hardware configuration and software needs are normally switched off, i.e. they don't consume RAM or CPU resources, aside from MAC (SeLinux/AppArmor/etc) which, if enabled, must be disabled manually to free up processing resources. It's unlikely that you can make your PC run substantially faster by ...


1

I'm kinda new to the setup of raid-drives. You state you are implementing the RAID concept on NVME disks. A quick search on software raid with NVME does return some interesting articles. My understanding currently is RAID, preferably hardware raid, is limited to SATA and SAS connected disks. No one has released a hardware raid card that plugs into the PCI-...


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You could have created the array using the --write-mostly option, which makes the md driver avoid reading from the devices that follow it on the command line: mdadm --create --level=1 --raid-devices=2 /dev/md0 \ /dev/d2p1 --write-mostly /dev/d1p3 The read performance for the array will then be that of the faster disk. Writing, however, will still be ...


1

Alright, I finally managed to get a decent speed dumping the tape. The procedure I'm using now basically relies on using different block sizes for different parts of the tape. Currently I read the first 2KB of the tape with a blocksize of 64KB, then switch to 65KB (weird I know) for a couple of blocks (tested with 400). After that switch back to 64KB until ...


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You can Use Antix Linux which is very lightweight and uses 70mb of startup ram and it also performs well on the old hardware.I reccomend you to use the version of AntiX 17.2 which is very good and it is system-md free. It is also based on Debian which is the also one of the most lightweight and easy to operate.


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I would recommend some diagnostic tests to isolate issues before taking any actions. Tape drive slows down due to drive-related issue, such as head worn-out, guide roller problems and motor problems. The reason is because the drive retries read process when there is a high error rate. Tape drive also slows down due to media-related issue, such as defect, ...


2

The super fast way of incrementing a number in a file, could be: awk -F, '{$0=$0+1}1' OFS=, failtoban.txt >tmp; mv tmp failtoban.txt and for decrementing the number you can do: awk -F, '{$0=$0-1}1' OFS=, failtoban.txt >tmp; mv tmp failtoban.txt But, what this is not taking into account is the situation, where you have too fast increments or decrements ...


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I don't have Centos, but the man pages seem to correlate with Linux Mint, which I am using to investigate this. These features are IPCs (inter-process communication facilities). Shared resources (almost by definition) do not belong to specific processes. So reporting everything would be double-counting in many cases. I can see Shared memory segments listed ...


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Following comments, ps aux --sort -vsize helped locating the big spender, baloo. I'll propose disabling it; it's an index service, perhaps you can live without it. Control commands: balooctl status balooctl disable Edit ~/.config/baloofilerc Indexing-Enabled=false (perhaps needs reboot) You could also try to purge and rebuild cache, or narrow the directories ...


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Every DE in Linux has its own launch script, e.g. for XFCE its startxfce4. You can find them in /usr/share/xsessions. Now to get timing information you can open a failsafe session, i.e. plain xterm, and run this command: strace -tt -fF -o /tmp/xfce4.log startxfce4 Mind that you'll get a truly huge log. Run man strace for more info.


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