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4

The fragment of manpage you included in your question comes from man for GNU tar. GNU is a software project that prefers info manuals over manpages. In fact, tar manpage has been added to the GNU tar source code tree only in 2014 and it still is just a reference, not a full-blown manual with examples. You can invoke a full info manual with info tar, it's ...


3

I don’t think there is a GUI equivalent to this option. The --strip-components option to tar is effectively a cut on the file paths. Going back to the tarball that started all this, tar tf shows mediawiki-1.33.0/.phan/config.php mediawiki-1.33.0/.phan/internal_stubs/memcached.phan_php mediawiki-1.33.0/.phan/internal_stubs/oci8.phan_php mediawiki-1.33.0/....


2

POSIX defines a pathname component as a filename. The phrase “pathname component” makes sense in the context of a path, e.g. mediawiki-1.33.0/.phan/config.php, where the components are mediawiki-1.33.0, .phan, and config.php. I had originally answered this here, so this is probably a duplicate.


2

Take the example path /path/to/file/. The three components of this path are path, to and file, separated by the delimiting character /. It really is as easy as that.


2

Thanks to @Fox. Had to use sudo launchctl start|stop postfix


2

I understand that the rightmost file of a file tree of at least two directories, will be extracted... No, the first two directory components dir1/dir2 of the tree are omitted from extraction (if you're extracting relative pathnames). This is different. Lets assume we have the following directory structure: dir1 ├── dir2 │   ├── dir3 │   │   ├── dir4 │   │ ...


1

You can use the following below command to check whether the user has access to scp command or not: echo $PATH Example output: /usr/local/bin:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/sbin:/sbin This will display commands paths in which user have access. Suppose if you are checking for scp command, scp command will be located in /usr/bin/. If the output of ...


1

It is the partition, volume group, or logical volume that contains the space, not the path. You can run du -sh or df -h but the first will just show you the space that the path itself is using and the second is a bit misleading because it will show what's available for the entire partition or volume group which contains the path. If that suits your needs, ...


1

For any command or application Linux namespace can be used easily with firejail like the following example firejail --noprofile --quiet --blacklist=/path/to/exclude command-or-app Alternative way to exclude directory from find firejail --noprofile --quiet --blacklist=/path/to/exclude find /search/location -name am-looking-for-this Note that this method ...


1

To supplement the good answer by larsks, to try to help clear up the confusion around the -C option: The tar man page states for the -C option: -C, --directory=DIR Change to DIR before performing any operations. This option is order-sensitive, i.e. it affects all options that follow. so, it is not like mv - it is literally ...


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