New answers tagged

0

a work around could be a script named say dterm that runs this: #!/bin/bash command="$@";st -- $command that way when you run dterm sudo command it'll pop up a terminal for password input as a added bonus you can also run any terminal application throught dmenu p.s. st is a terminal it can be replace with any terminal that accepts the -e or -- argument ...


0

I wrote my script inspired by the comments in this post, so I'll post it here as another source of inspiration. My requirements were, no rsyncd on remote, password login, no exposure of password in history or command line. That's actually not very difficult: #!/bin/bash HOST=mymachine.mydomain.com USER=fms LOCAL=/home/fms/Progetti/MyProject/src read -s -p ...


2

You can replace nullok_secure with nullok in /etc/pam.d/common-auth. You may also need to adjust values in /etc/pam.d/sshd if you have some specific overrides. You should have something like this in your common-auth file: auth [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so nullok


1

You can script(1) as a mini-expect, provided that you can cope with adjusting arbitrary timeouts, which is of course quite kludgy: { sleep 1; echo PASSWD; } | script -q /dev/null -c 'ssh user@host CMD' or with the syntax of BSD's script(1): { sleep 1; echo PASSWD; } | script -q /dev/null ssh user@host CMD The sleep is necessary because ssh will drain the ...


0

I've followed the step by step instructions of Mathew Robinson here and it works like a charm.


0

PBKDF2 I wrote a simple application in Go that allows to generate PBKDF2 hash, as OpenSSL does not provide a commandline tool for that. It supports sha1, sha256, sha512 and md5. You can build it yourself, or download released binaries in "release" section. https://github.com/riotkit-org/gpbkdf2 The usage is very simple: gpbkdf2 --passphrase=my-secret-...


1

The lines in /etc/sudoers.d/ab should probably be like this: ab ALL=(root) NOPASSWD: /bin/systemctl stop NetworkManager ab ALL=(root) NOPASSWD: /bin/systemctl start NetworkManager With sudo and normal, locally stored sudoers.d files (and nothing advanced like sudoers information stored in a LDAP server), any changes to the sudoers files should take effect ...


1

What is causing this? Answer from the manpages man chromium: --password-store=<basic|gnome|kwallet> Set the password store to use. The default is to automatically detect based on the desktop environment. basic selects the built in, unencrypted password store. gnome selects Gnome keyring. kwallet selects (...


0

You cannot prevent that users will be able to run chpasswd using pam_time.so, as this only ensures that the PAM permission check will fail when a user actually tries to change his or her password. If your goal is to prevent users from changing their password using chpasswd during the specified hours in /etc/security/time.conf this approach should suffice. ...


0

I wanted to comment, but it tells me I cannot because of too few reputation. So sorry for this 'answer'. The answer from @Wolf to delete the keyrings in ~/.local/share/keyrings/ helped me too. From there on I saw in Default_keyring.keyring an explanation for this behaviour. It seems there is a quirk in the GNOME libsecret API and google just adds a dummy ...


0

If this happens to you, please include the end of the system log as the error tells you to check. It sounds like you would have had to use a tool like autopsy to recover the /home/.ecryptfs/user/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file which contains the encryption key encrypted with your password. 'rewrapping' is the process of decrypting that key and re-...


0

None of the answers so far are truly cross-OS. The main flaws are represented by the locale definition (MacOS case) and tr being unable to recognize intervals of characters (Solaris case). You should try shlibs. It's fresh and truly cross-OS. The code to get a random string is shlibs str005 (./shlibs str005). Get a random string of 50 chars, include ...


Top 50 recent answers are included