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You appear to be assembling two 465.8 physical volumes into a raid0 (stripe) which should yield a roughly 931.6 (minus overhead) sized logical partition. You then have (apparently according to your lsblk output) partitions totaling 1863.039201G I may be wrong, but it appears you have multiple issues here: You're trying to use roughly twice your total ...


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@LinuxSecurityFreak's solution works for me. I just want to add that if your swap partition is encrypted, then you also need to comment out related line in /etc/crypttab, otherwise CryptSetup will keep you waiting for 90 seconds during boot time. Why a new user cannot comment on existing answer? I have to make a new answer for this supplement:(


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So i solved it myself, I had to change my ssd mode to AHCI in the BIOS Menu. Boot repair worked fine, no boot issues anymore.


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If you boot with EFI, then /boot/efi is another mount of the separate EFI system partition, so you already have a partly separate boot partition, that is the EFI partition. That is only partly, because /boot also contains GRUB, kernels etc. So the question becomes: why does all these don't go into the EFI partition?


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Since you use UEFI mode, you could install all the bootloaders on the same ESP, assuming it is big enough to contain them all. However, if you want each drive to be bootable on its own, then you might want to create an ESP on each disk. All the Linux distributions I've seen will leave existing UEFI NVRAM boot variables alone and just create their own on ...


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I wanted to add a little more to the above answer. once I ran Gparted and did the resize and then rebooted the O/S (Fedora) still didn't recognize the increase in space. I had to run the following as root: lvdisplay - this gives you the logical volume information that you want to expand, just in case your naming convention is something unique. lvextend -...


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As far as I understood, this describes the current state: /dev/nvmen0n1p1 is mounted on /tmp/mnt – boots Windows, not Pop_OS /dev/nvmen0n1p6 is mounted on /boot/efi – boots Pop_OS, not Windows I came up with course of action: du -sh /boot/efi get "Linux ESP" size du -sh /tmp/mnt get "Windows ESP" size check if Windows ESP big enough ...


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I want to summarize how the problem is now solved. First I did the resizing/moving once with gparted to get the values for resizing/moving and to get the exact steps that are performed. The values and steps are stored in gparted logs. Following steps are executed: # Check file system sudo e2fsck -f -y -v -C 0 "/dev/loop18p3" # Resize filesystem ...


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Kali seems to be based on Debian, and Debian's standard location for it is /boot/efi. In Linux terms, the EFI partition (formally ESP = EFI System Partition) is just a FAT32 partition with a special type identifier in the partition table. Ideally an EFI-bootable disk should use GPT partitioning, in which case there is a special type GUID for the EFI ...


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You're going to have a very difficult time of it. You could try recreating the original partitions, but if you've partially overwritten the filesystem you'll be very lucky to get data back. This issue has been previously discussed at Accidentally installed Linux Mint over Windows/Ubuntu. How do I recover data (SSD)?


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Extended partition provides space for logical partitions, if you want to use the free space for LVM physical volume, you must add a new logical partition for it, extended partition itself is just a "container" and can't be formatted. That's also why lsblk shows it as being 1 KiB, because it is in fact only 2 sectors big (2 * 512 B) -- it only holds ...


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For those who find this question in the future, and use cloud-init on their server (either dedicated servers e.g. via MAAS, or virtual servers (VPS's) via any virtualisation software or "cloud" providers), there's a very easy fix. How I ran into this issue I migrated the rootfs on one of my VMs from it's original root partition, to a new disk - and ...


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The command you want is lvextend or lvresize. See man lvextend and man lvresize for the documentation. (The difference is that lvextend will only increase the size of an LV, whereas lvresize will also allow you to reduce it.) Looking at your question, /dev/sda3 has 149GB allocated to it. This is the Physical Volume (PV) underlying the Volume Group (VG) that ...


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I think you are looking for the lvextend command: $ lvextend --resizefs --size 148G This will increase the size (to 148G in this case) of the logical volume and resize the filesystem within as well. $ lvextend -l +100%FREE will fill the entire available free space. Extending the lvm is safe, shrinking lvm is tricky...


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You have created a logical volume (LV) but you haven't yet created a filesystem on it. Here's an example to create an ext4 filesystem with a label fooLV mkfs -t ext4 -L fooLV /dev/fooVG/fooLV


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In my question with a headline of Undoing wipefs, I chose to re-create partitions using the testdisk, it's probably best for you to avoid it as it took a measurable amount of time (not just hitting Write), before I did so, I must have carefully inspected both partitions - testdisk allowed me to read their structure, I went ahead and read a few directories - ...


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You're lucky that wipefs actually prints out the parts it wipes. These, wipefs -a /dev/sda /dev/sda: 8 bytes were erased at offset 0x00000200 (gpt): 45 46 49 20 50 41 52 54 /dev/sda: 8 bytes were erased at offset 0x3b9e655e00 (gpt): 45 46 49 20 50 41 52 54 /dev/sda: 2 bytes were erased at offset 0x000001fe (PMBR): 55 aa echo -en '\x45\x46\x49\x20\x50\x41\...


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Can I / Should I just hit Write (Write partition structure to disk)? Only and only if all the partitions are listed. Partition table recovery If all partitions are listed and only in this case, confirm at Write with Enter, y and OK. Now, the partitions are registered in the partition table.


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It's working! First as mentioned by @cas, I made a mistake when declaring the size of the home directory where I accidentally used the size of the overall disk. But the main problem here is the syntax error that prevented home directory from created. Surprisingly, the debconf-set-selections that has syntax checker using an option -c did not complain about ...


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I'm answering this myself so there will be a record of this variant of the solution. It turns out the solution to this is quite similar to all the examples on the net where people can't get mariadb to start when they move it to /home, with a twist. On Debian 10, systemd includes /usr in directories. It's by design that you can't have a website running out of ...


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