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If you are using Debian, update your /etc/apt/sources.list entries to point to the official https mirror redirector: deb https://deb.debian.org/debian/ <dist> <suite> deb-src https://deb.debian.org/debian/ <dist> <suite> e.g. for Debian unstable: deb https://deb.debian.org/debian/ unstable main deb-src https://deb.debian.org/debian/...


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Yaourt was removed from the official servers of Arch Linux by serious security problems. Die. It can no longer -or should not be- download from official repositories, and it's not safe to do it by any other means. I recommend switching to safer alternatives for AUR packages, like aurman. Links of interest: Yaourt is Dead! Use These Alternatives for AUR ...


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Given the lack of mutual dependencies, which is guaranteed, the following algorithm will yield the minimal set: for each package in the list, list all of its requirements (rpm -qR foo) for each package in the requirements, remove it from the list if it’s present Listing foo’s requirements yields baz (presumably among others), and listing baz’s requirements ...


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Services and applications should be packaged together; at least, services should be packaged with the binaries implementing the service they manage. In most cases, installing systemd units is transparent. If the main build installs units into the expected target directories (/lib/systemd/system), they will be picked up and enabled automatically. If the ...


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What you're asking about is a fairly common issue with several solutions having been developed over the years. I've used the following three separate tools on various occasions - all worked well for me at the time, so I have no preference. All are available in the debian repositories and have ample documentation. apt-offline reprepro apt-cacher-ng


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I don't think --no-download is meant to be used with update, it might be ignored. If you have an online machine running Debian, it stores the files it downloads/updates with apt update in /var/lib/apt/lists, you can try copying that to your offline machine, but I have no idea if that will do anything marginally useful. But they are mostly useful in finding ...


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As steeldriver suggests, aptitude search '?depends(ncurses)?depends(portaudio)' will search for packages depending on both ncurses and portaudio (strictly speaking, on packages matching those search strings, i.e. with ncurses or portaudio in their name). In Debian 10 the only match is freemat.


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You would probably also need to install the development libraries of openblas, just as you did on the Ubuntu system: apk add openblas-dev Alpine maintains an extensive package search tool that can help find out if packages are split into multiples.


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For Ubuntu, starting from the link you give, you can find the package’s changelog by looking for the “Ubuntu Changelog” on the right-hand side. This doesn’t distinguish between releases; it will give you the full changelog for the version of the package currently in the suite you’re looking at. You can get an overview of the package in all currently-...


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You can get the history of changes through : apt changelog <package_names> or apt-get changelog <package_name>


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I'm sorry. I think, it impossible to get old version of library using only simple shell command. To find it I've used rpmfind.net It shows, that this library version available for el6 system, not for el7. Maybe it is possible to get such information in el7 by enabling repositories for el6, but it has no sense. Installation from wrong repositories could ...


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You can use the yum whatprovides: provides or whatprovides Is used to find out which package provides some feature or file. Just use a specific name or a file-glob-syntax wildcards to list the packages available or installed that provide that feature or file. e.g: yum whatprovides "*libmysqlclient*"


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The Ultimate Debian Database has an upstream version query which you can use to list all packages who either don’t have a watch file (to track upstream releases) or whose watch file results in an empty value (because upstream has gone, or an error occurred): curl https://udd.debian.org/cgi-bin/upstream-status.json.cgi | jq '.[] | select(.["upstream-version"]...


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To install the same software from one EL machine to the next, first, get a list of all installed packages on the machine that has all of the desired software that is already installed. rpm -qa > packages.list Next, prepend each line of output with the word, install. sed -i 's/^/install /' packages.list Next, create a new line at the end of the file ...


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I already had the sys-apps/man-pages installed but it was somehow broken. Reinstallation helped. emerge -a sys-apps/man-pages


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Since there is no "How To" on the Internet for manual FreeBSD package verification, here's what I have figured out. Trick is that octet string in openssl rsautl output is in fact hash of the string that is SHA256 hash of a file. For example, download current http://pkg.freebsd.org/FreeBSD:12:amd64/latest/digests.txz, extract it and do following: Method 1 (...


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dpkg print un (unknown) because its database isn't updated. You can use the sync-available from dctrl-tools package to synchronize dpkg info with apt. sudo apt install dctrl-tools sudo sync-available man sync-available : sync-available - sync dpkg's available database with apt's database DESCRIPTION This program updates the dpkg(8) available database ...


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I’ll address the underlying question first: dpkg -l | grep '^.i' will list all installed packages. Other tools can provide this information too; for example apt list --installed In dpkg -l’s output, “not-installed” does indeed mean that dpkg is aware of a package’s existence, even though it’s not installed on your system. The package file itself might be ...


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