4

Create a /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/http-proxy.conf with the following line: Acquire::http::Proxy "http://user:pass@proxy.example.com:8080/"; Then run: export http_proxy=http://user:pass@proxy.example.com:8080/ Or add it to your ~/.bashrc . sudo apt install package_name Debian FAQ: Q: How do I tell {{{apt-get}}} which http-proxy to use? A: Set the ...


3

By default, systemd will use service file from /usr/lib/systemd/system/daemon.service. However, if it finds the service unit in the /etc/systemd/system/daemon.service, it automatically uses this unit and ignores the default one. So basically cp /usr/lib/systemd/system/daemon.service /etc/systemd/system/daemon.service and make whatever changes you need in ...


2

Your package Bar has probably ended in the state manual rather than auto as can be confirmed if found in the output of the command: apt-mark showmanual and is thus no longer handled by apt-get autoremove. You can use the tool deborphan from the package deborphan specialized to find such packages. It doesn't use the package's manual status for its ...


2

During installation, at least for Debian 10 (and IIRC in earlier releases too), you’ll be asked whether to configure a network mirror: Answering “No” at this point will result in a system configured to retrieve packages from the CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs you’ve scanned, and from the security mirror. Once installation is complete and you’ve booted into your new ...


2

If you need libvirt 4.0, then you'll have to build it from source. Attempting to add the repos from Ubuntu 18.04 isn't a good idea because it can trap you in dependency hell or otherwise break your system. You can get the source code from Github: https://github.com/libvirt/libvirt/releases You might have to build other dependencies from source as well ...


2

Install/configure the EPEL repository (see: Fedora Wiki) and install via yum check-update ; yum install xclip


2

A couple of things: if THIS_DIR contains dirname -bash, cp -Ri $THIS_DIR/... expands to the equivalent of cp -Ri dirname -bash/... (because of word splitting), that is, cp gets dirname and -bash/... as distinct arguments. That second one starts with a dash, so it tries to interpret the letters in it as options. GNU cp doesn't have -h as an option, so it ...


2

First, update the repositories to fetch the latest updates with: apk update Then, try to simulate the upgrade with: apk upgrade --simulate You can do it in one shot: apk update && apk upgrade --simulate If you want to simulate the upgrade of one specific package: apk add -u $package --simulate where of course $package is the package you want ...


1

I’m not aware of a repository providing ecryptfs-utils for RHEL 8. The package was removed in RHEL 7, and the upgrade path is to switch to LUKS (re-encrypting the data). However it is still available in Fedora, and in EPEL 7, so you could request a build for EPEL 8; see the ecryptfs-utils EPEL 7 request for a template.


1

Here are the basics of package creation. They apply to a wide range of systems, from FreeBSD and OpenBSD to Arch Linux, Debian Linux, and Ubuntu Linux. One makes a package by: Obtaining the source code tree, via git or subversion or some such, or by downloading and unpacking an archive file. Installing pre-requisite build packages, providing the tools ...


1

On apt, you'll get a locked only if another process is installing packages. So I suspect that by "install multiple packages", you mean "asynchronously install packages from multiple sessions" Snap is a little different in that it effectively installs a container for each application you want to install. That means each container is isolated from each ...


1

dpkg-query doesn’t support filtering on status, but it can output packages’ status, which allows them to be filtered: dpkg-query -W -f='${Status}\t${package}\t${version}\t${architecture}\n' | grep "^install ok installed" dpkg -l is based on dpkg-query and thus can’t filter on status itself either. aptitude provides more powerful search options, and can be ...


1

The command that you are using only specifies the package, version number, and architecture and will print it all regardless of the status. If you just want to show packages that are installed: dpkg --list | grep ^ii The status will be in the first column with ii meaning that it is expected to be and is installed. The pipe into grep ^ii shows only the ...


1

This issue was caused by the fact that I had switched my sources.list to testing, and then later changed back to stable, essentially leaving half of my packages as stable versions and half as unstable. To fix this, I changed my sources.list to be hardcoded to the specific version name that testing is at the moment (bullseye) and then upgraded all my ...


1

Not only are you running debian/sid which is the unstable version of Debian, it is also Bullseye which hasn't been officially released yet.. The packages are mostly development versions that are then released to testing before they are released to the stable version. The unstable version will never be released, isn't really meant to "work", can undergo ...


1

This won’t answer your question as stated, but should help you address the underlying scenario. The traditional solution when one needs a source of packages with unchanging versions it to use private package repositories: mirror your chosen distribution’s repositories, and then leave them as-is, only changing packages piecemeal. The latter part is the ...


1

I opted to go this route after reviewing the others. This came up for me when running many docker containers and needing curl / jq and not being able to rely on what was available from job to job. script: - if [ -x "$(command -v apk)" ]; then apk add --no-cache curl jq; fi - if [ -x "$(command -v apt-get)" ]; then apt-get install curl jq; fi - if [ -x "$...


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