5

apt upgrade will tell you what it would like to do, including package upgrades; and this will include a list of packages it won’t upgrade: $ sudo apt upgrade -o APT::Get::Show-Upgraded=true The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required: [any packages which could be auto-removed] Use 'sudo apt autoremove' to remove them. The ...


4

You could search for filenames in packages with dpkg -S: -S, --search filename-search-pattern... Search for a filename from installed packages. $ dpkg -S '*.icc' colord-data: /usr/share/color/icc/colord/x11-colors.icc libgs9-common: /usr/share/color/icc/ghostscript/lab.icc libgs9-common: /usr/share/color/icc/ghostscript/scrgb.icc ...


2

apt will usually do this if upgrading a package requires the removal of another package. You can apply upgrades like these with apt dist-upgrade apt will ask you whether you want to actually update the packages, so you can also use this for listing the packages in the first place.


2

dpkg -S will tell you which package provides that file: $ dpkg -S /usr/share/i18n/locales/iso14651_t1_common locales: /usr/share/i18n/locales/iso14651_t1_common You could put that package on hold using sudo apt-mark hold locales, but that will cause problems; instead, you should divert the file: sudo dpkg-divert --divert /usr/share/i18n/locales/...


2

The packages conflict because they both ship /usr/bin/bison. I don’t know whether that’s sensible nowadays given how old bison++ is. I suspect you’ll need to switch between the packages depending on what you need to build. In the long run it might be worth porting the application to Bison, which supports C++ and is actively maintained.


1

Pacman's -n flag purges configuration files for packages installed from AUR. Pacman handles both the packages of official repositories as well as AUR in the same manner. During search, I found the answer here : What should I consider when deleting an AUR package? The correct way to delete a package is pacman -R package-name. To delete everything, including ...


1

You can use the following command: To list all available packages in a specified repository, do: repoquery -a --repoid=REPONAME To download all the packages, use xargs with yumdownloader repoquery -a --repoid=REPONAME| xargs -i -t yumdownloader {} when repoid is the name of your remote repo.


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