10

To be clear, I'm using criteria that are usually termed as Free Software Guidelines. The two major versions of this that exist, which are very similar to be the point of being virtually indistinguishable, are the Debian and the FSF definitions. Here is the FSF take on this. There is room for disagreement. Personally, Debian is plenty free enough for me. ...


6

Here's the preamble to COPYING, included with the kernel source: NOTE! This copyright does not cover user programs that use kernel services by normal system calls - this is merely considered normal use of the kernel, and does not fall under the heading of "derived work". [...] note that the only valid version of the GPL as far as the kernel is ...


6

knowledge about early source-code repositories is woefully incomplete According to the SourceForge wikipedia page: SourceForge, founded in 1999 by VA Software, was the first provider of a centralized location for free and open-source software developers to control and manage software development and offering this service for free. It's certainly the ...


5

To control the depth of the tree use the -L option. tree -d -L 2 .


3

Each distribution tends to have its own set of tools for this, there’s not much shared software here. Debian uses wanna-build, buildd and sbuild, which you’ll all find documented on the Debian site (follow the links too). wanna-build maintains the build queue, buildd picks a package to build, and sbuild builds it. wanna-build tracks packages with missing ...


3

Linux is a specific software project (the kernel) that's distributed under the GPLv2. That licence requires, among other things, that the source must be provided with it derivative works created by linking the code must be distributed under the same license people be free to spread it as they please, provided the above conditions are met So if you use the ...


3

The same community that brought you Ogg, FLAC, Vorbis, and now Opus, created XSPF. Unlike M3U, XSPF is XML. Unlike SMIL, XSPF is simple. Unlike ASX, XSPF is open. From a practical standpoint, however, there isn't many software out there, that supports it. I still tend to use it for little projects, etc. but aside from RockBox, VLC and I think Foobar, there ...


3

I don't believe either configure or make is hard to learn. However, they are complex, so they can be tricky to learn - especially through experimentation. For example, make requires commands to build a target are indented strictly with a TAB character, which is hard to distinguish from spaces in many cases. Here's a page that goes over both of those (and ...


3

I'm pretty sure you can use wget and SourceForge, always use the url for the latest source. http://sourceforge.net/projects/$$PROJECT_URL$$/files/latest/download?source=files Where $$PROJECT_URL$$ needs to be replace by the part of url corresponding to the project. for ntopng ==> ntop which gives you: wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/ntop/files/...


3

Fedora has among its guidelines that nothing that can't be redistributed in source without legal restrictions (in the US, mainly because it is an US based distribution) is allowed. The exceptions to this are firmware for devices that the vendor allows to distribute freely, mostly distributed by/with the kernel. This is stuff that doesn't run on your ...


3

$ date; i=0; while (( i < 1000000 )); do (( i ++ )); done; date Tue Jul 15 11:26:37 EDT 2014 Tue Jul 15 11:26:43 EDT 2014 $


2

A lot of it is done with autoconf. I don't have any tutorial in particular to recommend (beyond the official documentation), but you will need one and that is what you want to look for. "Autoconf" colloquially refers to a suite of tools including 'automake'. I have not done it for a while, but I'll try to sketch out the process from my notes: For each ...


2

QPDF says it supports 256bit encryption in it's massive manual. I didn't read it all and have never tried it. It looks like it's worth a shot. http://qpdf.sourceforge.net/


2

There are several aspects to consider... Yes, Android is open source, at least as provided by the Android Open Source Project. However as you mention more and more of the platforms’ features are provided as non-open source components, e.g. in Google Services; this includes somewhat basic features such as the swiping keyboard, and more complex subsystems ...


2

Yes and no. You could run https://www.lineageos.org/ to have a completely FOSS operating system. You would still want some sort of app marketplace. You can put "gapps" on your LineageOS phone, or you could use https://f-droid.org/. However, "thinking in the mindset of Debian," this is like running Linux on a laptop in 2001: you may still need closed-...


2

There is PureDarwin: http://www.puredarwin.org/ PureDarwin is the successor of OpenDarwin, and is a free, open source, community supported project to make Darwin more usable and compatible with non-Apple hardware. In reference to this question, PureDarwin is binary compatible as long as you do not rely on a library or other feature that is only available ...


1

To determine dependencies of a project, (assuming it's a dynamically linked compiled binary), you can run ldd on the compiled results. This will show you exactly which libraries are required to build (but not necessarily all) and run the software.


1

Most GNU/Linux distribution include some proprietary software, but there are some that don't do that. Here is a list of 100% free GNU/Linux distributions according to the Free Software Foundation. Anyway I'm not aware of any proprietary desktop environment that is widely used in the GNU/Linux world.


1

Open source means that the source is open: available to look at. That does not influence the copyright and the license. The copyright holder can of course change the license (as with DaDaBIK in June 2012). The license of the software also determines whether derivatives are allowed and can be commercial or not.


1

I think you're out of luck with that hardware. It doesn't have support within the OpenWRT project for it: http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/d-link/dsl-2640u-bru-c I found no other opensource firmware project that support it either. I went through each of the project's router databases: DD-WRT Tomato Additionally I went through the larger projects and none ...


1

What are these files? The $PROJECT/t directory is the canonical place for a project to keep its automated unit tests. How come the folder doesn't have a more descriptive name? By adhering to what is basically a standard naming convention, it is perfectly descriptive of what files go into this directory. Other programmers will expect to find a /t ...


1

From my experience, the t/ directory usually include automated tests. Quoting from the Git t/README file Core GIT Tests This directory holds many test scripts for core GIT tools.


1

Ubuntu provides specific repositories of nonfree software, and Canonical expressly promotes and recommends nonfree software under the Ubuntu name in some of their distribution channels. Ubuntu offers the option to install only free packages, which means it also offers the option to install nonfree packages too. In addition, the version of Linux, the kernel, ...


1

There are few popular OCR command-line tools: Tesseract (ReadMe, FAQ) (Python) Also available for: Tesseract .NET, Tesseract iOS An OCR Engine that was developed at HP Labs between 1985 and 1995... and now at Google. Tesseract is probably the most accurate open source OCR engine available. Usage: tesseract [inputFile] [outputFile] [-l ...


1

Scai seems to have it answered in the comments. A lot of these are just plain text, so there is no proprietary license on them; use whichever you'd like. M3U seems to be a popular choice. EDIT: polemon pointed out that some plain text formats such as ASX (XML-based) require a license for use. Watch out for things like this.


1

The Mozilla code drop can be browsed on GitHub here: https://github.com/jrmuizel/mozilla-cvs-history/tree/781c48087175615674b38b31fcc0aae17f0651b6


1

stress-ng is a simple tool that can stress and benchmark the cpus. For example, tested 1 cpu stress-ng -c 1 --cpu-ops 5000 stress-ng: info: [20288] defaulting to a 86400 second run per stressor stress-ng: info: [20288] dispatching hogs: 1 cpu stress-ng: info: [20288] successful run completed in 13.93s


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