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4

You can use the command vorbiscomment to read, modify and delete the metadata on a Ogg Vorbis file. It's part of the vorbis-tools package. Installation $ sudo yum install vorbis-tools reading You can use the -l switch to list out the tags with their corresponding values like so: $ vorbiscomment -l antonio_diabelli__rondino.ogg title=Antonio Diabelli / ...


4

This one-liner worked for me, with audio and video: vlc v4l2:// :input-slave=alsa:// :v4l-vdev="/dev/video0" :v4l-norm=3 :v4l-frequency=-1 :v4l-caching=300 :v4l-chroma="" :v4l-fps=-1.000000 :v4l-samplerate=44100 :v4l-channel=0 :v4l-tuner=-1 :v4l-audio=-1 :v4l-stereo :v4l-width=480 :v4l-height=360 :v4l-brightness=-1 :v4l-colour=-1 :v4l-hue=-1 :v4l-contrast=-...


3

You have to create a script in /etc/init.d, for instance "read_radio". You have to set the proper rights on it chmod +x /etc/init.d/read_radio You have to edit the file and create the script that will launch the radio, for instance: #!/bin/sh /usr/bin/mplayer -shuffle -playlist /path/to/radiocampus_local.m3u Or whatever method you want to use to read ...


3

As you can see in the output, you encoded your audio into Format : FLAC. This is a format with lossless compression. ogg is just a container, and can hold different formats. To keep a similar size and quality as your mp3 you can choose the more usual vorbis format explicitly: ffmpeg -i in.mp3 -c libvorbis out.ogg The fact that it did not do this by default ...


3

Using GNU Parallel you can run: parallel ffmpeg -i {1} {1.}.{2} ::: *.wav ::: ogg mp3 flac {1} = replacement string for first input source {1.} = replacement string for first input source with extension removed {2} = replacement string for second input source ::: *.wav = input source 1 ::: ogg mp3 flac = input source 2 This will use all your cores.


3

ffmpeg accepts multiple output formats. Set the input file.format with -i followed by the output file.format: ffmpeg -i input.wav output.ogg output.mp3 output.flac Batch conversion: As a simple one liner with putting each format in a separate folder: mkdir mp3 ogg flac; for i in *.wav; do ffmpeg -i "$i" -b:a 320000 "./mp3/${i%.*}.mp3" -b:a 320000 "./ogg/${...


2

ffmpeg should do this for you, without re-encoding: ffmpeg -i in-file.opus -c:a copy out-file.caf That works here, but I don't have a Mac OS X box to test the resulting file on. PS: You really ought not convert between lossy formats. Losses always get worse.


2

Ogg format do not support explicitly embedding images. What you can do is to convert the image to base64 and add it under custom tag/comment. You can check this Q/A for more details


1

If you only want to decode wav from ogg vorbis, you can simply use oggdec utility to do that, instead of ogg123 (which has more dependencies). To build a "static" version of oggdec, you will first need to build static versions of libogg and libvorbis libraries, like this: #Create staging directory STAGING=$HOME/staging/vorbis-tools mkdir -p $STAGING #...


1

There are multiple mechanism to have something start on boot-up. I don't know where the audio comes from that is specified in the .m3u file, but certainly if it is from a network, you should make sure everything the playback needs is operational. A simple solution might be to put the command in /etc/rc.local as a background task. The other thing you could ...


1

vorbiscomment -w file.ogg < /dev/null


1

Out of curiosity, are you sure that the audio source is the proper source? Secondly (again, just a question) why aren't you using ffmpeg to stream the video instead? Something like but not quite: ffmpeg -b 100K -an -f video4linux2 -s 320x240 -r 10 -i /dev/audio2 -i /dev/video0 -b 100K -f ogg - | mplayer - -idle -demuxer ogg Swap the audio input and video ...


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