59

In Cinnamon 2.6 and later you can have additional panels in any monitor without installing additional software. Just right-click the panel, click on Modify panel ... and then on Add panel. The top and bottom edges of all monitors should get highlighted and a new panel will be set up where you click. It works perfectly. Here is a github post from when it was ...


28

This was posted a while ago and I am sure you have gotten your answer already, but for those who haven't. Run these commands sudo apt-get install xdotool sudo apt-get install wmctrl Then download the bash script from the following link (credit to jc00ke) https://github.com/jc00ke/move-to-next-monitor Personally, I have a directory in my root where I ...


21

You can define a binding in your i3 config. Note: windows are called "containers", and monitors are called "outputs". move workspace to output left|right|down|up|current|primary|<output> Here's what I use in my config: # move focused workspace between monitors bindsym $mod+Ctrl+greater move workspace to output right bindsym $mod+Ctrl+less move ...


19

To move it to a different monitor, right click on an empty area, select "Properties" and then uncheck the 'Expand' box. Now left click on the end one of the ends and drag it to a different monitor. Right click again on the end (making sure not to hit any other widget in the panel) and click on Expand again.


16

Right click the panel, go to 'Panel preferences'. You'll have a dropdown for 'Output'. Change this from 'Automatic' to the display you want it to show up on. By default it will be on the left-most monitor.


15

With MATE, you can create new panels and drag them to the second monitor (to enable drag, uncheck "Expand" in the properties, also uncheck "Autohide and "Show hide buttons"). Then, if you add a "Window List" on each display, it will manage each display's windows separately. This is very nice except that the Workspace Switcher still operates on both ...


15

Short answer: yes, you can do this. I have my (Fedora) desktop set up this way, each monitor is an independent display. It is the same 'desktop', in the X sense, but there are some limitations to typical desktop functionality with this setup versus the 'single desktop spread over two monitors' configuration. [For example, you can't drag a window from one ...


15

You can achieve this using the xrandr extension. Read this wiki page and/or this article for more information. Make sure that the virtual desktop is not greater than your laptop screen. With the --pos option of xrandr you can then mirror parts of your screen to the projector, e.g. for a 1600x900 laptop screen and a 1024x768 projector at position 100,100: ...


14

NOTE: This was tested on a laptop with a i915 driven graphics card. Background NOTE: When a new screen is plugged in, no event is sent to the host, this stayed true even after my last edit. So the only way is to use polling. Trying to make them as effiicient as possible... EDIT #3 Finally there's one better solution (through ACPI): There's still no ...


14

This is now possible (UPDATE #2) Cinnamon now has this functionnality. To save you the trouble of reading this long answer, you can directly go to nedim's Unfortunately Cinnamon does not appear to have this functionality, (yet?). It only shows a panel on your primary monitor. There are several issues on the project's Github page that are requesting it. ...


13

The UltraVideo device If you look at the specs for that particular device it doesn't support Linux. Features Support Windows XP,Vista, Winodws 7,Windows 8, windows 8.1, Mac OS up to 10.9.4 (**Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server**) System Requirements Does NOT support XP 64bit and Windows Server/Linux Other compatible devices? ...


10

I have made some changes to the above script mentioned, originally authored by jc00ke. - Mine is set up for three monitors. - It maintains whether the window was maximized or not. - It is used to move the window left or right with the usage script-name -l and script-name -r respectively. - I added a fix where Chromium apps when minimized are very small and ...


10

The panel appears on the primary monitor. You have not said how you are setting your system up so I can't give you a very detailed answer. You will need to use xrandr to find out you current setup. In my case this is: $ xrandr | grep -w connected VGA-0 connected 1440x900+1600+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 408mm x 255mm DP-3 connected 1600x900+...


10

For windows and workspaces, you need to define a binding in your i3 config. Note: windows are called "containers", and monitors are called "outputs". For moving windows: move container to output left|right|down|up|current|primary|<output> This is what I use in my i3 config: # move focused window between monitors bindsym $mod+Shift+greater move ...


8

tl;dr: Force a "virtual" output of your gfx card to a display mode, and export that with x11vnc. You can achieve this, but there are a few prerequisites: A graphics card with multi-head capabilities (= can render several "desktop" surfaces). Which is most cards these days. x11vnc, a mature software (x11vnc) to export X11 surfaces (among others) to VNC ...


8

Using Fedora 26, I faced the same issue with VIRTUAL1 not being shown by xrandr command. Then I followed this instructions , to reuse an empty output, like HDMI-2, and it worked quite well, but: Gnome (and xrandr) does not recognize the empty output as connected, and does not show the virtual monitor to arrange position in extended desktop or clone. Every ...


8

Yes there should be. Try Mod+Ctrl+j to focus the next screen. Then Mod+Ctrl+k should focus the previous screen.


7

I also created my own python script to move windows across monitors. https://github.com/calandoa/movescreen Usage: movescreen.py <up|down|left|right> Interesting features: handle the 4 directions handle some special cases like windows overlapping on several monitors restore independently fullscreen, maximized horizontally and vertically states ...


7

There's a module in KDE called KScreen that is doing this. To disable it, go to K Menu->Computer->System Settings->System Administration->Startup and Shutdown->Service Manager. Look for a service called KScreen, and uncheck the Use box. You can stop the service now if you want. You can also manually edit $HOME/.kde/share/config/kdedrc, and add these ...


7

This workaround helped me. What I do now is after performing a xrandr scale, I run an extra command which stops the mouse flicker. xrandr --output eDP-1 --auto --output HDMI-2 --auto --scale 2x2 --right-of eDP-1 # Simpler oneliner scaling xrandr --output eDP-1 --scale 0.9999x0.9999 # Stop flicker


6

Nvidia uses its own "TwinView" technique, are you sure you really use Xinerama? In case you do, give a try w/o it. UPD.: Reading man fluxbox: session.screen0.toolbar.onhead: <integer> For those that use xinerama, users can set this value to the number of the head where they would like to see the slit and toolbar, ...


6

first run $ xrandr this will give output like this: Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 5120 x 1080, maximum 8192 x 8192 HDMI1 connected 2560x1080+2560+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 677mm x 290mm 1920x1080 60.00* 1680x1050 59.88 1600x900 59.98 ... HDMI2 connected 2560x1080+0+0 (normal left inverted right x ...


6

Having a single Thunderbolt port does not mean that you can connect only one Thunderbolt display. Thunderbolt can be daisy-chained. Multiple displays are possible via a single Thunderbolt port. I do not know whether Linux supports daisy-chained Thunderbolt displays. And of course I do not know whether Thunderbolt daisy-chaining is an option for you, as far ...


6

Get the monitor number (or numbers) you wish to full screen rdp: xfreerdp /monitor-list Start full screen on monitor: xfreerdp /monitors:2 /multimon /v:<host> Or full screen multiple monitors: xfreerdp /monitors:1,2 /multimon /v:<host>


6

I met the same bug. Your workaround didn't work for me. Your trick is simply a trigger that makes the bug not to fall in. I digged in a bit and found a nice guy with a solution that might help others here as well. The main problem is that the bug we met here causes the monitor which is scrolling into the other to have a virtual screen with the size of both ...


5

Here is a small utility program that does what you want: https://github.com/zoltanp/xrandr-invert-colors


5

I don't see anything wrong with parsing the output of ddccontrol. DDC is the right way to get the information you want. Unlike with VGA, where DDC was created, the HDMI connector was designed to include DDC from the start. They even went back and modified the DDC standard to add more features for HDMI, calling it E-DDC. On Linux, the userland tool for ...


5

I know it's an old question but I'm answering for posterity. xrandr-invert-colors is a small app which does exactly what we need. I have both xcalib and xrandr-invert-colors bound to different shortcuts, so that if I do want to invert only my secondary monitor, I can execute both (xcalib will re-invert the primary monitor to normal colours). Get it at ...


5

One way is to create an udev rule, but as I wanted something more portable, I have this bash script. It relies on inotifywait support, does not have some kind of loops and is considered efficient. external-lcd.sh #!/bin/sh # inspired of: # http://unix....


5

Well, I just found shutter, a nifty tool that can do this. You can install on Debian-based systems with sudo apt-get install shutter Then, once you launch shutter, take your screenshot limiting it to the active monitor only: I just checked and it works perfectly on my LMDE running Cinnamon, it correctly took screenshots of the monitor where my mouse was ...


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