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I wanted to add another source of this problem I encountered today. Once you change the user id of a unix user, the smb user created via smbpasswd may not able to authenticate for the samba share anymore resulting in the same error. So if you changed your unix user id via usermod -u 1000 my_user then you may run into problems. The fix for me was to delete ...


1

The better option would be mount the new file system manually and add the new file system entry in the /etc/fstab to make sure this f/s get mounted on every reboot. As mentioned above "mount -a" will ignore the already mounted file systems and mount only the file system which was not mounted yet (new file system). Hope this will helps.


0

please see man gpart && man newfs. ;) To cover your listed disk layout. The following would suffice gpart delete -i 7 da0 Assuming you wanted a MSDOS FAT32 partition with fat32 as it's label gpart add -t fat32 -l fat32 -i 7 da0 Now let's format that slice/partition, and label it FAT32 :) newfs_msdos -F32 -L FAT32 /dev/gpt/fat32 Done. Oh, want ...


5

It will ignore already mounted partitions. In the same time, you can do a mount -o remount /dev/xxx on a partition already mounted, this won't cause any problem even if users are using this partition


13

It skips ones already mounted. https://github.com/karelzak/util-linux/blob/master/sys-utils/mount.c#L185-L193 while (mnt_context_next_mount(cxt, itr, &fs, &mntrc, &ignored) == 0) { const char *tgt = mnt_fs_get_target(fs); if (ignored) { if (mnt_context_is_verbose(cxt)) printf(ignored == 1 ? _("%-25s: ignored\n") : ...


0

How to format and mount a disk permanently using its's UUID. Find the disk name sudo lsblk This will show you a list of disks. Usually the first disk is vda and bootable. The second disk will be vdb, third vdc etc. vda will typically be split in to multiple partitions, e.g. vda1 (/boot) and vda2 (/). The new disk will have no partitions and no ...


1

MS-Windows sets the execute bit on every file. (One of the reasons for its poorer security). noexec is the option to disable excitability. Using the umask will stop directories from being traversable, because directories need execute permission. Therefore mount with option noexec.


-1

You could simply add the ro mount option, which stands for "read-only". More information can be found by typing man fstab and man mount.


2

You don't. That message is there for a reason. Something is currently using the partition so force unmounting it can lead to data corruption. So, the first thing you do is check what is using the partition: $ sudo umount mountpoint umount: /home/pi/mountpoint: target is busy (In some cases useful info about processes that use the device is ...


0

I figured it out. Command works when I used IP address instead server name. sudo mount -t cifs //0.0.0.0/shared /mnt/myfolder -o user="username"


0

Try this: sudo mount -t cifs //ServerName/Public /mnt --verbose -o vers=3.0,domain=ServerName,username=guest,guest,file_mode=0666,dir_mode=0777 Because of the --verbose option, it might produce a lot of messages regardless of whether it is successful or not, but if it fails, please copy & paste those messages into your original question to enable ...


2

If you are mounting an NTFS partition it is possible that this partition, from Windows was as hibernate. Restart Windows and shut down it completely. Then, try again


2

According to mount(2) man page, there are three possible causes for EBUSY (= Device or resource busy) error from a mount() system call: /dev/sdb2 might be already mounted. On remount operations, a filesystem cannot be remounted read-only if it still has files open for writing. (This doesn't seem applicable in your case.) Or the specified filesystem cannot ...


2

If you just want to find it for yourself, not for later use in a variable. you won't find a shorter way than df .: $ df . Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/sda6 343650580 232263752 93860660 72% /home That has extra details, of course, so can't be used to just save the device name to a variable directly. However, it's ...


0

A few points here:: First, remove noauto, because that would prevent mount -a from working. Then also check if the "T" bit is set on /media/dvd, such as chmod +t /media/dvd This will set the sticky bit on the dvd directory so that anybody can write to it and own and be able to remove modify only his/her files directories. In addition, CAP_SYS_ADMIN Linux ...


4

Looking at man findmnt I see a number of suggestions that seem to do what you want when finding the mount point for a filesystem: findmnt --first-only --noheadings --output TARGET --target "$PWD" /home Or with less readability: findmnt -fno TARGET -T "$PWD" /home


1

You don't need your OS to recognize the partition. You can (try to) mount the entire device with proper offset. E.g. if you suspect (or if any tool tells you) the partition started at sector 2048 (quite a common value with 512-byte logical sectors), then try: sudo mount -o ro,offset=$((2048*512)) /dev/sda /some/mountpoint (ro just in case; without it it ...


1

That looks perfectly normal. The automounter takes over the top level directory, /srv/xray for all the mounts defined in the corresponding file or program, /etc/auto.xray. (In your case it's a normal file.) Filesystems are only mounted on demand, so when you looked inside /srv/xray you would initially have seen nothing. But when you ran ls -ld /srv/xray/...


0

My workaround for this was to manage it this way: One udev rule for the USB inserted action. The scripts coming in the meanwhile mount/umount the drive themselves. One udev rule for the USB removed action. USB gets inserted I execute one script which just saves the device name into a file. I can append any other script in this rule: ACTION=”add”, KERNEL=”...


0

First I have been doing lots of debugging, no solution found. Then I realized that I have on old Linux version which is working (it was prepared by another company, years ago). That proofs that it is not a hardware issue. Also the fact that 2 different hardware boards show the same issue indicate not a hardware issue. At some point I decided to try an old ...


0

It's unusual to partition LUKS/LVM devices and as such, this is not covered by most standard tools. In fact, keeping partitions hidden on Device Mapper devices is a feature, as Virtual Machines using Logical Volumes as backing devices would usually partition those but NOT want their partitions to show up on the host. I want to mount the md0_crypt1 ...


1

They're all different filesystems. What they have in common is the filesystem type: they use the tmpfs driver, which stores the data in memory¹. There's no ”super-tmpfs“ that they're all part of: all the instances are independent. The “device column” shows tmpfs because many configurations are unimaginative and use the same string for the device name as for ...


1

2019 UPDATE: On some recent Linux releases, you need to install ntfs-3g utilties: Open TERMINAL and write: sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g (Or download from http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-download/) And after write: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb1 (where sdb1 is the device name from error message) THIS WILL RECOVER THE CORRUPTED MTF TO NORMAL and ...


0

I have tried with below script #!/bin/bash echo "enter the file system to check whether its mounted or not" read p echo $p for i in `cat /proc/mounts` do if [[ $p =~ $i ]] then echo "$p is mounted" else echo "$p is not mounted" fi done Only input you need to give is name of filesystem


0

Debugging AutoFS To debug autofs stop the service and run it on the command line: sudo service autofs stop sudo automount -f -d Or turn on Debug Logging Edit /etc/autofs.conf and set logging to "debug" or "verbose": logging = "debug" Play with this..But actually I had enough details leaving it as the default (ie comment out the line) Check Kerberos ...


0

Finally I got it, adding the user id and group id: sudo mount -ro uid=1000,gid=1000 Hirens.BootCD.15.2.iso ~/Tmp/foo/


1

Yes, Mint (and Ubuntu, and Debian) will allow you to have multiple drives with different partitioning, e.g., LVM on one physical drive and ext4 on another. It's just another partition; LVM coexists with ext4 just like ZFS can coexist with a different device formatted for ext4. The Debian link in the first line here shows LVM co-existing with non-LVM /boot, ...


0

Welcome to the StackExchange! First of all, you would need to format or add at least one partition to the newly added hard drives. This can be accomplished by either using the terminal with fdisk type this to select the first hard drive you mentioned: $ fdisk /dev/sdb Type ‘n’ to create a new partition. Specify where you would like the partition to end ...


3

The error is not because you already have another ISO device mounted; the mount -o loop will always get the first unused loop device or create a new one. And it's not because the same ISO image / loop device is already mounted on another directory -- the same device can be mounted on different mount points at the same time. What you're probably trying to ...


0

suid is the default. The explicit suid option is only needed for the case where you want to remount a file system or override the options from /etc/fstab. This isn't part of your question, but notice that the nosuid option also affects file capabilities -- they will be ignored on filesystems mounted that way.


0

Simply remove options about user, pass, or sec all together, and put device and dir at the end, after options, like this: sudo mount -t cifs -o file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 //192.168.1.1/diskname /mnt/diskname In case that a user or pass is needed, it will ask for them. And... mount error(2): No such file or directory make sure that the directory /mnt/...


0

Finally I've found that I should mount with option -o vers=1.0


1

Another solution is thru Polkit... Edit /usr/share/polkit-1/actions/org.freedesktop.UDisks2.policy Change everywhere: <defaults> <allow_any>auth_admin</allow_any> <allow_inactive>auth_admin</allow_inactive> <allow_active>auth_admin_keep</allow_active> </defaults> ... With : <defaults> <...


0

Needed to implement a thing that would react on USB Flash Drive inserted (into autonomous BBB device) - to get device name, mount fs there, rsync stuff to it, unmount. To avoid whatever concurrency issues (i.e. multiple things screwing with device in parallel), proper error logging and other startup things, most obvious thing is to wrap the ...


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