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You could create a loop device out of the image. LVM should be able to automatically detect all the VGs and LVs. Then you can mount/change whatever you want. Use lsblk and vgs or lvs to check what was detected. Example: lodev=$(losetup -f --show -P $YOURIMAGEFILE) If you don't need the partitions/LVs/filesystems anymore you can unmount everything, ...


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If your LV is linear, you can use a loop mount: mount -t <fstype> -o loop,offset=<offset>,sizelimit=<length> <dd file> <mountpoint> where the offset and length are specified in bytes. See the corresponding section of man mount for details. If the LV isn’t linear, you’ll have to use device mapper; see man dmsetup for details.


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LVM should be able to autoactivate the underlying VG (and LVs) after decrypting the LUKS device. The important things to check would be the LVM configuration file(s) and if the proper services are enabled and running. /etc/lvm/lvm.conf event_activation = 1 auto_activation_volume_list should not be set (the default is to activate all of the LVs). Enabling ...


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The key to solve this was strictly following the instructions about the DTB in https://github.com/dhruvvyas90/qemu-rpi-kernel#choosing-a-kernel-image Choosing a kernel image This repository contains three types of kernel images: kernel-qemu-4.*.*-buster are the most recent images, which are compatible with Raspbian Buster and Stretch. To use ...


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You can fix this error by unmounting and remounting the mountpoint. Then try this command: sudo fusermount -uz /data mount /data Attribution: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/24966676/transport-endpoint-is-not-connected


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First, you should use log with ddrescue. Second, your image is going to be an image of whole drive which means you have to know where partitions starts. +---------+-------...-+-------...-+-------...-+ | MBR PT | part1 | part2 | partN | +---------+-------...-+-------...-+-------...-+ Use file <image> to gen information on your image. ...


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Were I work, the same home is mounted for many remote machines going from the oldest Solaris to the newest debian... many of them having non-standard alternative install dirs. I came here to get tips, about how to properly set the default shell when it is not installed at the same place on every machine. But in fact, I can give some : I use tons of ...


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On a system with systemd, this problem can be encountered when you reformat the partition and try to mount it back. I moved a disk from encryption to unencrypted, causing systemd’s generated mnt-disk.mount to (where mnt-disk is mount path from /etc/fstab) to refer the old path that didn’t exist any more, causing mount to go haywire. Just doing systemd ...


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Create the directories bitlocker and bitlockermount under /media. Then you can add the following to your /etc/fstab: /dev/disk-by-id/... /media/bitlocker fuse.dislocker user-password=<password>,nofail 0 0 /media/bitlocker/dislockerfile /media/bitlockermount auto user,nofail 0 0 The first line may need the user attribute, also. Test it out.


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Use the option ssh_command: sshfs : /mnt/volume -o ssh_command='ssh userB@systemB -t ssh userC@systemC' Unmount with: fusermount -u /mnt/volume


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First, since we can not know what exactly happened to your partitions/file systems, this advice is given without any guarantee. Before making changes to your partitions and/or file systems you should backup the raw data, e.g. by booting from a live USB and copying your entire disk to a safe location. Saving it as a compressed regular file (to save space) is ...


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It looks like you forgot to resize the filesystem after shrinking the partition. You must use resize2fs in order to shrink the filesystem to be smaller than the partition is. You cannot have partitions that are smaller than filesystems resize2fs /dev/sda2 239G This should give you one gig of space to ensure the filesystem is smaller than the partition ...


2

/proc is the interface between the kernel and userspace for all its contents, and most of those contents aren’t available in any other way (for content under pid directories, outside of that process). So hidepid=2 is effective in hiding information such as a process’ command line and environment from other users. Some information can be determined through ...


3

More or less like you would for /dev/sdb1. First of all unmount /dev/sdb1 (you can mount it somewhere else). umount /dev/sdb1 You can create another directory and mount the disk there: mkdir /physical-data mount /dev/sdb1 /physical-data ...(the other options you already have). In /etc/fstab, rename "/data" to "/physical-data". Now the hard disk is ...


1

It is the partition, volume group, or logical volume that contains the space, not the path. You can run du -sh or df -h but the first will just show you the space that the path itself is using and the second is a bit misleading because it will show what's available for the entire partition or volume group which contains the path. If that suits your needs, ...


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Tried with code and worked fine It shows Total space,Avaialble space,Used Space df -Ph /boot/|awk 'NR >1 {gsub("%","",$0);print $0}'| awk '{print "Total Space of partition" " "$2"\n""Used space on the disk is" $3"\n""free space on the disk is "$4}'


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df | grep "^$(readlink -f /dev/disk/by-uuid/$UUID) " |sed 's/^[^%]*% \+//' This works also when bind-mounts are present of subdirectories of the mount, which might confuse some other potential solutions. (Edit:) Allow spaces in mountpoint. (Edit2:) Mountpoint may contain "% " as well.


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findmnt -noTARGET "/dev/disk/by-uuid/$UUID" grep "$(stat -Lc '%#t %#T' "/dev/disk/by-uuid/$UUID" | xargs printf '%d:%d')" /proc/self/mountinfo awk -v dev="$(stat -Lc '%#t %#T' "/dev/disk/by-uuid/$UUID" | xargs printf '%d:%d')" '$3~dev{print$5}' /proc/self/mountinfo In order to trim bind-mounts: awk -v dev="$(stat -Lc '%#t %#T' "/dev/disk/by-uuid/$UUID" | ...


0

... unplug it without unmounting it before, the next time I plug I in, it registers as /dev/sdc without anything else connected ... This is strange, the kernel should notice the device removal. Try upgrading your kernel. In what way is the old device still in the system and how do I remove it so that new drives get the next free letter? Try this, and ...


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I was finally able to debug the issue on my side. I had to install a Debian buster system (linux kernel 5.4.x) to be able to use dynamic debug since one error message was hidden from the user level. The steps to debug a failing CIFS mount are at: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/LinuxCIFS_troubleshooting Those gave me a more verbose error log: [...] [ ...


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Ok, I'm not sure why this hasn't been answered yet, as it is straight forward. So I'll just throw this out here. /dev/sda2 4892672 1953262990 1948370319 929,1G Microsoft LDM data is a Microsoft dynamic disk. GNU mount cannot handle it, as it doesn't understand the file system type. You will need to install ldmtool. #[bash]: ldmtool create all Will ...


0

try netstat -an --inet | grep "445 " you will get someting like tcp 0 0 1.2.3.4:23716 8.8.4.4:445 ESTABLISHED where 445 is port number for cifs (you need to quote to include a space) netstat --inet -an will display tcp connection (-n is for numeric) Edit : you may need to use df or mount before. Edit2 : to get IPs netstat ...


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This is, to prevent data loss ! Run the following command, to see what process prevents unmounting. I am assumimg, that you skipped the partition on the dev to type less: lsof | grep '/dev/sdc' Close your work or end the given processes and unmount again. You cal also see, what files are still open with: fuser -u /mnt/ Whereas the following command will ...


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Check so that there isn't any process using the mountpoint, like your own shell for example. If that doesn't do it lsof |grep /mnt/ can help you pinpoint what's using the mountpoint.


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It is hard to explain it with language elements (at least with my english skills) - so I decided to make an example based answer: The root directory is often called the highest or uppest directory. This is only partially true. This directory is assumed as the highest directory. You could describe it with "from this directory I will start - I assume this ...


-2

Looks like a bona-fide bug... Check with the latest kernel from your distribution, and report it with full details (attach your test program!).


0

Sounds like you just want a new boot menu entry where you set different partitions as root filesystem. With that you can decide which partition you want to use on each boot (and only the partition you booted from is mounted). You can set a default option. The bootloader will boot from that if you don't do anything during the boot process (pressing nothing ...


-1

So the solution was simply to read properly my schroot config file. It stated: $ cat /etc/schroot/chroot.d/sid64 [...] profile=desktop So I need to edit the file: /etc/schroot/desktop/fstab and not /etc/schroot/default/fstab (desktop != default). I used : $ tail -1 /etc/schroot/desktop/fstab /mnt/dbc64c37-340a-49e5-8184-a69e01e5e231 /mnt/dbc64c37-340a-...


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As far as I can tell, there is no way to change the location of systemd's predefined logging directories, /run/log/journal and /var/log/journal. It's possible via the Storage configuration option to choose which of those two options are used. But you can't change the path to /anotherfs/log/journal. What you can do is make /var/log/journal a symlink to ...


1

You don't say what you did, so the following is guesswork. As you say, you might have messed up your home directory. Impossible to do as you, either used root or sudo. Connect as root and look around. Check the permissions of /home/user. Fix with e.g. chmod u+rwx /home/user. (I think this is unlikely). Much more likely is breakage of the startup files for ...


2

1. Your root fs is on the pt : "nvme0n1p2" 2. The device `sda1` is mounted on: "/mnt/dbc64c37-340a-49e5-8184-a69e01e5e231" 3. Your chroot is created under : "/home/malat/debian/sid-root/" 4. The schroot mnt-pnt shall be : "/mnt/dbc64c37-340a-49e5-8184-a69e01e5e231" (in chroot) Your first mistake on your first try: You tried to auto-mount the ...


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