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4

Well, this seems to be a very interesting effect, which is a consequence of three mechanisms combined together. The first (trivial) point is that when you redirect something to the file, the shell opens the target file with the O_CREAT option to be sure that the file will be created if it does not yet exist. The second thing to consider is the fact that /tmp/...


2

There is a distinct difference here: On a ext2/3/4 filesystem, "deleting" a file by its name means that the reference to the inode, i.e. the data structure where the file data is attached to, is removed (the filename you see in ls is merely a reference to that inode). A file is only considered "deleted" when the last such reference is ...


2

If Windows has left a flag that this is a hibernated partition, then you won't be able to mount it as usual. Furthermore, using ntfsfix on such a partition can have some DANGEROUS CONSEQUENCES! You could try to manually mount that filesystem in read only mode: mkdir -p /tmp/sdb5 mount -t ntfs-3g -o ro /dev/sdb5 /tmp/sdb5 cd /tmp/sdb5/ ls -la


2

The slowdown is more probably caused by the disk usage rather than CPU usage. tar massively reads and writes for the 600G directory. See also related post. As the tar process is already running, you have to get its pid, using pidof tar or ps aux | grep tar and renice its I/O priority to class 3. -c, --class name or number of scheduling class, 0: none, 1:...


0

It looks like the underlying problem was solved by @pgoetz, but for posterity I'll address the original question about how capture NFS logs (I had similar issues but couldn't find an answer about logging either!). Detailed logging for both the NFS server and its clients can be obtained using rpcdebug, which will generate kernel logs (so they'll show up in, ...


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The problem has fixed itself - as part of doing standard OS updates, I noticed that grub now shows on boot and the nvme partitions show in File Manager, more details in OP. Thanks to all who contributed!


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If you're using device without lsblk and findmnt(for example: Oracle Enterprise Linux 5), and you can't access the internet in that device, use cat /etc/fstab or cat /proc/mounts. You can't see the UUID, but you can see logical volume and where it's mounted.


0

While Windows's fast start up is known to put your data in shared NTFS partitions at risk (you really want to turn it off, at least if the shared partition is the Windows system partition), it has definitely nothing to do with eOS not recognizing the NVMe SSD. I am nearly sure that we can rule out everything which might be already stored on that SSD as ...


0

Found the answer with the help of reddit. I'll summarize here, but you can refer to this reddit thread. Option 1: with guestmount guestmount -a 'STALKERSOUP Game Install.iso' -m /dev/sda mnt/ Where you find /dev/sda with : virt-filesystems -a "STALKERSOUP Game Install.iso" Option 2: with udisks # Setup loop file with udisksctl udisksctl loop-...


1

TL;DR: Remove umask=000 from your fstab entry. This is not a valid mount option for an ext4 filesystem. The umask option is only available on filesystems like FAT and NTFS that do not support Unix permissions. Additional details: The error you're getting indicates that system startup failed, but root isn't allowed to log in with a password, so systemd won'...


0

I realize this thread is old, but if your system is newer, like Ubuntu 20.04, you could use udiskctl: udisksctl loop-setup --file something.img It will create loop devices for the partitions in the img and mount them. Cheers.


0

This behavior is not necessarily surprising or indicator of a serious fault. In Linux, a mount point is first and foremost a directory on the root file system, an can be used as such without restrictions (subject of course to the usual access permissions). The special meaning of mount point arises when you actually attach a file system to it using the mount ...


1

This may be almost a duplicate of this other question. Please read my answer there to learn what could happen. Almost, because I would not suspect similar problems for a disk reporting 512 as its physical sector size. So maybe the RAID controller distorts the value(s) now; maybe the USB enclosure interfered like in the other question; maybe ESXI did some ...


0

fsid=0 for the mount options in /etc/exports was the same and should be different. This works now.


1

I know this question was asked and answered a long time ago, but I came to it as I had that exact problem. Currently, gvfs-mount is deprecated. You should follow the start-up answer but you should use gio mount : gio mount 'smb://10.0.0.2/nick/' I hope that is going to help someone. 😊


2

These options are not available for ext* filesystems. Check the man page for mount(8). these options are only valid with filesystems like tmpfs, fat, adfs ...


1

You can mount a Clonezilla partition image read-only using concat-fuse, ratarmount and imagemount (from the partclone-utils package) in combination to concatenate the chunks, decompress and mount the filesystem image on the fly. This method does not write anything to disk besides the index that is built to randomly access the compressed data. Generating the ...


0

You should be able to mount the partitions, but you must understand the difference between the image and the partitions. The image contains two partitions. You can (should) not mount the image, but you should mount the partitions. So, from the command-line that would be: $ sudo -s # losetup -Pf 2018-11-13-raspbian-stretch.img # ls /dev/loop* /dev/loop-...


2

The rationale is given in the background section. It was relevant up to the mid-to-late 2000s, but is no longer relevant these days. The reason to make /usr a separate filesystem is to keep the root filesystem small. The /usr directory tree is for installed software. Installed software doesn't change often, so you can mount /usr read-only. The root ...


0

You're reading a very old manual which is in some ways deprecated. In the past for some Unix'es there used to be a separate /usr mount point and the rest of the files (/bin /etc /root /usr /sbin) - were required only for successful booting. Nowadays, Linux distros are getting rid of /bin /sbin and /lib and moving everything in them to /usr/{bin,sbin,lib} ...


2

Perhaps your /etc/fstab specifies some mounts by either UUID= or LABEL= (causing mount to loop through all block devices it finds) and you have some garbage files as /dev/sdf and /dev/sdg that are not actual device nodes? Run ls -l /dev/sdf /dev/sdg. If it displays anything, and the letter in the very first column of the permissions string is not b, those ...


0

(Not an answer, but since I can't post comments yet, I am posting this here.) Could it be that on your system the mount command is wrapped in some script? Could you please post the output of these... mount --version file -L $(which mount) ls -la $(which -a mount) cat /etc/fstab


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