91

This is all due to the fact that the X server is out-dated, ill-suitable for today's graphics hardware and basically all the direct video card communication is done as an extension ("patch") over the ancient bloated core. The X server provides no builtin means of synchronization between user rendering the window and the screen displaying a window, so the ...


23

With xrandr you can affect the gamma and brightness of a display by altering RGB values. From man xrandr: --brightness Multiply the gamma values on the crtc currently attached to the output to specified floating value. Useful for overly bright or overly dim outputs. However, this is a software only modification, if your hardware has support to ...


18

Why is it called eDP1? Because it is an embedded display port style adapter, and not a video graphics array style one.


16

Screen tearing appears mostly because of two reasons - drivers that aren't there yet, and lack of vsync with certain window managers. As for drivers, both free and proprietary drivers support free-tearing compositing (nvidia and amd both). Be aware that e.g. enabling tear-free desktop in catalyst (fglrx) may cause frame drop and lags, so it is usually ...


13

Okay, so, the answer is that the redshift program, pointed out by Stéphane Gimenez in a comment above, can do this pretty simply. It's meant to do a clever adjust-white-point-over-the-day thing, but it can also be made to do one-time adjustments with the -o flag. The desired color temperature in Kelvin must be given twice because of the time-based features, ...


13

NOTE: This was tested on a laptop with a i915 driven graphics card. Background NOTE: When a new screen is plugged in, no event is sent to the host, this stayed true even after my last edit. So the only way is to use polling. Trying to make them as effiicient as possible... EDIT #3 Finally there's one better solution (through ACPI): There's still no ...


13

If you're using an nvidia driver >= 365.20, then try enabling the "Force Full Composition Pipeline" option in nvidia-settings.


13

I found the base of the solution here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/186288/how-to-detect-and-configure-an-output-with-xrandr In modern Linux distributions, including CentOS, the xrandr library is responsible for things such as screen resolution, rotation and so on. Since your system does not autodetect, you have to manually tell it about the mode your ...


12

The xrandr command is the one you are looking for. An example usage is: xrandr --output HDMI1 --auto --same-as LVDS1 You can have --left-of, --right-of. Run xrandr on its own to see the different outputs that are available.


10

Your laptop should have /sys/class/backlight. For example, /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness. You can write (echo) values to this file to adjust brightness. cat /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/max_brightness > /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness This will set the brightness to max. Just put it in an init script on boot.


10

Device files on Unix systems in general are just one way for user programs to access device drivers; there isn't a one-to-one mapping from devices files to physical hardware, and not all hardware has a device file (or even a device driver). The kernel itself doesn't use device files to interact with hardware. As pointed out by lcd047, network cards don't ...


9

This question really belongs back on raspberrypi.stackexchange.com because it's a Raspberry Pi-specific issue: the kernel framebuffer driver for the Raspberry Pi does not support the function that X uses to put the monitor to sleep: https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/issues/487 Until this issue is fixed, it won't be possible for X to put the monitor to ...


9

I had a strong tearing here and now it is solved. After reading this (wonderful explanation) of how an Xorg server works I realized that X server paints window updates directly to the memory card at any random time unless you use a compositing enabled window manager. When compositing is enabled the window manager put together all the changes from the ...


9

Actually, all of these interfaces are capable of backlight control (and more), as long as both, graphics card and the monitor support the Display Data Channel. DDC is based on I²C, so you have to install and load appropriate kernel modules to make it work. # Debian sudo apt-get install i2c-tools sudo modprobe i2c-dev # RHEL sudo dnf install i2c-tools ...


8

In Ubuntu's Monitor Preferences, it is identified as Viewsonic Corporation 16". How can I extract this human readable form? That human readable form ("Viewsonic Corporation") does not come (directly) from your EDID: Ubuntu uses gnome libraries underneath. libgnome-desktop decodes the edid and - via pnp-ids - converts the three-letter vendor ID ("VSC" in ...


7

xset dpms force off works for most X setups.


7

Disable X11 forwarding (using -x switch to ssh) and set the DISPLAY environment variable for machine B. For example, this will tell you the settings for :0 on machine B: ssh -x machineB DISPLAY=:0 xrandr


7

Building on @M132's answer, ddccontrol appears unmaintained and hasn't added configurations for any new monitors since 2006. Fortunately, there is a newer tool: ddcutil, that is much more robust and actively developed. After installing one of the prebuilt packages or building from source, it can be used to query and set brightness (among myriad other ...


6

You're looking for headless with X. It's little bit described on ArchWiki, there's shown a way how to do this. There's another alternative to run headless X11 compatible server: Xvfb(X virtual framebuffer). It's a display server that performs all graphical operations in memory without showing any screen output. startx is just front-end for xinit which ...


5

I just solved a similar issue here: a solution I used fakexrandr, fakexrandr But I am seeing that some people are using fakexinerama fakexinerama


5

If xcalib/xgamma do not apply settings to all or a specific monitor in a multiple monitor setup configured dynamically via xrandr, then brightness and gamma per-output can be controlled via xrandr: xrandr --output DVI-0 --brightness 0.8 --gamma 1:1:1


5

Try: find /proc /sys | grep -ie brightness -e light -e lux -e lumin On this laptop (a MacBookPro), it reveals (among other things): /sys/devices/platform/applesmc.768/light which is neither over PCI or USB. You could try the same after sudo modprobe -a tsl2550 isl29003 isl29020 apds9802als apds990x bh1770glc bh1780gli which are drivers for various ...


5

I have used arandr, this utility allows to save a script configuring your two screens. (I know there is also the utilityxrandr but I have not used it.) I have added this script to my startup in fluxbox (I don't know where to put it for openbox) so each time a session is started, my two monitors get configured. I don't understand what you mean with desktop ...


5

You can use vbetool to turn the display on/off from the console. off: $ sudo vbetool dpms off on: $ sudo vbetool dpms on This command construct will turn it off, and then if you hit a key turn it back on: $ sudo sh -c 'vbetool dpms off; read ans; vbetool dpms on' References [SOLVED] How to turn off monitor at CLI Turn off monitor using command line


5

I know it's an old question but I'm answering for posterity. xrandr-invert-colors is a small app which does exactly what we need. I have both xcalib and xrandr-invert-colors bound to different shortcuts, so that if I do want to invert only my secondary monitor, I can execute both (xcalib will re-invert the primary monitor to normal colours). Get it at ...


5

You can do so by modifying the Xorg.conf by adding the line Section "Monitor" Identifier "Monitor1" Option "Rotate" "left" EndSection or after login use the xrandr command as: xrandr --output DVI-2 --rotate left Replace DVI-2 and left as per your requirement xrandr solution will be effective till session exist. On reboot, the ...


5

You found the command yourself, you just need to parse it. For example: $ xrandr -q | grep -Po 'current\s*\d+\s*x\s*\d+' | awk '{print $1/$3}' The regular expression looks for current, then 0 or more white space characters (\s*), then one or more digits (\d+) followed by \s*, then x, then \s* and finally more digits. The \K simply discards anything that ...


5

use vidcontrol MODE_xxx For example to have a screen 1024x768x24, in the console : # vidcontrol MODE_280 To know which mode you can be interested in, in the console : # vidcontrol -i mode The left column gives you the number you have to put after MODE_


5

first run $ xrandr this will give output like this: Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 5120 x 1080, maximum 8192 x 8192 HDMI1 connected 2560x1080+2560+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 677mm x 290mm 1920x1080 60.00* 1680x1050 59.88 1600x900 59.98 ... HDMI2 connected 2560x1080+0+0 (normal left inverted right x ...


5

You can try xrandr tool. First run xrandr --verbose and look for a line with resolution like LVDS1 connected 1024x600+0+0. The name of your display (LVDS1 in this example) is needed here. Now you are ready to set brightness: xrandr --output LVDS1 --brightness 0.4 xrandr sets software, not hardware brightness so you can exceed both upper and lower limits: ...


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