15

See if modprobe -rv iwlmvm helps instead. Use iwldvm for older card types.


14

The usual way to add several dummy interfaces is to use iproute2: # ip link add dummy0 type dummy # ip link add dummy1 type dummy # ip link list ... 5: dummy0: <BROADCAST,NOARP> mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000 link/ether 22:4e:84:26:c5:98 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 6: dummy1: <BROADCAST,NOARP> mtu 1500 qdisc ...


12

Not many people know about this, but there absolutely is a way to blacklist a driver built into the kernel. First and foremost, you should run lsmod | grep <driver_name>. If you don't see any results, congratulations - your driver is built directly into the kernel and the normal way of blacklisting it isn't going to work. Instead, you'll need to ...


8

On Debian and derivatives (Ubuntu, Mint, elementary, …), modules listed in /etc/modules (one per line, and you can specify arguments) are loaded at boot time. On systemd-based systems, modules listed in /etc/modules-load.d/*.conf (one per line) are loaded at boot time. However you don't normally need to load a module explicitly. For most hardware, Linux ...


8

modprobe is looking in /lib/modules to know whether a module is present. So you should check first if the current version of your running kernel has nfs module: ls -l /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/fs if you don't see nfs folder, it means the nfs module is not compiled for your running kernel. You can recompile kernel to make it use nfs module. However, ...


8

To create dummy interfaces upon boot, I advise adding to /etc/modules dummy Beware the module dummyonly allows two dummy interfaces by default before kernel 4.4.x( correct version to be verified). If you need more, you have also to create either a /etc/modprobe.d/local or /etc/modprobe.d/dummy.conf defining the parameter numdummies with the number of ...


8

The proper file is: /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf (notice the extension .conf). And at the end of this file put a line: blacklist intel_lpss_pci


7

You need to unload the nouveau driver before you can load the nvidia driver. However, the nouveau driver is currently in use by the X-server, so it cannot be unloaded yet. You have to stop the X-server first (but don't just re-start it, as then it will use the nouveau driver again). So in short: stop X-server: sudo service lightdm stop unload the nouveau ...


7

As far as I know, you can use modprobe to adjust parameters only when the feature in question has been compiled as a module - and you're loading the module in the first place. For setting module parameters persistently, you'll have the /etc/modprobe.d directory. (Generally you should leave /usr/lib/modprobe.d for distribution's default settings - any files ...


6

As you noticed, there was an application using the module. The KVM module actually presents (part of) its functionality through the/dev/kvm device file. So find out what application is using it - e.g. with $ lsof | grep /dev/kvm


6

You can also temporarily blacklist them on the grub command line (linux line) when you boot with the syntax module_to_blacklist.blacklist=yes OR modprobe.blacklist=module_to_blacklist You need to modify the grub,cfg to make the changes permanent. Mind you, this solution will not work for few modules


6

The uevent message contains information about the device (example). This information contains registered vendor and model identification for devices connected to buses such as PCI and USB. Udev parses these events and constructs a fixed-form module name which it passes to modprobe. modprobe looks under /lib/modules/VERSION for a file called depmod.alias ...


6

With the precious help from @A.B I managed to fix this. As he said, my kernel (probably every armbian SBC kernel) doesn't have usb_storage loaded as a module, it is built-in. In this case, we need to change the boot options that are visible under /proc/cmdline: root=UUID=b58.... rootfstype=ext4 console=tty1 console=ttyS0,115200 panic=10 consoleblank=0 ...


6

Finally found something on it. It appears to be a "feature" where unsigned code can't be loaded into the kernel when UEFI secure boot is enabled (which it is). To get the module loading, disable kernel lockdown via sys-rq: # echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq # echo x > /proc/sysrq-trigger Then modprobe should work: modprobe wireguard For more ...


5

It's because the module rtl8192cu is already loaded and this prevents 8192cu to load. So, first unload that module: modprobe -r rtl8192cu Now, you can load the new one: modprobe 8192cu If it works you can blacklist the first module. To blacklist a module and thus preventing the loading during bootup use this command: echo "blacklist rtl8192cu" >> /...


5

The version of modprobe in Ubuntu 12.04 (from module-init-tools version 3.16) does have a -l option, with description -l --list List all modules matching the given wildcard (or "*" if no wildcard is given). This option is provided for backwards compatibility and may go away in future: see find(1) and ...


4

A few things to try: modprobe.d/*.conf files are (mainly) for blacklists and if you just add a module name like fglrx then the rest of that config file gets ignored (which is your issue). So remove fglrx from the modprobe.d/radeon.conf file and add it to /etc/modules (point #2): If you want to explicitly load modules /etc/modules should suffice. Rename the ...


4

I would have thought modprobe would ignore the blacklist, unless -b was specified... In any case, the following should work whatever the blacklist settings are: sudo insmod /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/drivers/media/usb/uvc/uvcvideo.ko If the modules uvcvideo depends on haven't already been loaded, you'll need to take care of that too (and then load ...


4

There's no automatic database relating sysctl variables to modules. You can search the module binary and hope that the variable name isn't found in other strings (this one isn't). Search for the last part, i.e. bridge-nf-call-iptables — the full string isn't present in the binary, it's constructed dynamically. grep -rl bridge-nf-call-iptables /lib/modules/`...


4

I had a similar problem on Debian 9 and my answer turned out to be quite similar but not exactly the same: (as root:) echo "options usb-storage quirks=4971:8017:u" >> /etc/modprobe.d/usb-storage-quirks.conf update-initramfs -u The 4971:8017 device id is a "SimpleTech" based Rosewill RX307-PU3-35B USB-3 disk enclosure advertised as supporting ...


3

In /etc/modules-load.d, add a file {filename}.conf. That file should have the following contents: nf_conntrack_ftp Do the following for more info: man modules-load.d Here's the doc for RHEL7: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/System_Administrators_Guide/sec-Persistent_Module_Loading.html


3

Sometimes you can use lsmod to try and backtrack what is using the module. Here's an example: kvm_intel 143597 0 kvm 459817 1 kvm_intel On my machine it says that kvm is used by kvm_intel. Also, kvm is not in use. If this were the case you should be able to run: sudo modprobe -r kvm_intel and then, sudo modprobe -r ...


3

To unload modules you can use these 2 commands, lsmod and rmmod. lsmod will list what modules are loaded, while rmmod will remove a given module from the Kernel, assuming it was dynamically built so that it can/could be dynamically loaded. $ sudo lsmod | head -5 Module Size Used by bluetooth 89276 0 cpufreq_powersave ...


3

The blacklist is read by modprobe where insmod just tries to insert a module without bothering with dependencies or blacklists or anything. insmod man page: insmod is a trivial program to insert a module into the kernel. Most users will want to use modprobe(8) instead, which is more clever and can handle module dependencies.


3

You can use the unbind interface in sysfs. Please refer to this article for details. You will find instructions for automating the unbind upon discovery of the device in this answer.


3

You're missing a link to the page in question, but even without that link I can tell you that the page is simply telling you to run modprobe v4l2loopback. The modprobe command is a way of inserting a new kernel module into the running kernel without having to rebuild the entire kernel and/or reboot the machine. Chances are you won't be able to successfully ...


3

Just tweak your sudo security policy, making up a rule in /etc/sudoers.d that allows: a defined set of users (possibly only one user or a group as needed), to ONLY execute modprobe and rmmod, ONLY on cmd argument psmouse, WITH or WITHOUT sudo password. This is exactly what '/etc/sudoers.d' is generally used for. So here goes... (assuming single host ...


3

Your answer lies in the lspci output. You're not loading the nouveau/nvidiafb. The line: Kernel modules: nvidiafb, nouveau identifies which kernel modules "support" your video card. The other line: Kernel driver in use: vfio-pci specifies which module is actually loaded for your video card. In this case you've specified the vfio-pci kernel module, ...


3

Installing the linux-headers solved my problem.


2

The exec command replaces the current shell with another command. It appears to be unnecessary in your case. If you do need it only use it on the last command.


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