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0

I'm doing this in ubuntu 18.04LTS, so maybe grep is different, but A1 gives you one line, so your check doesn't work. I changed it to grep -A2 and can now at least return what you're talking about with: dev=md0 foo=$(grep -A2 "^$dev :" /proc/mdstat);echo $foo Example output: md0 : active raid5 sdh1[0] sdg1[1] sdf1[2] sde1[4] 8790399744 blocks super 1.2 ...


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So this seems to be a case of a random bogus partition table mis-detection. Here's an example of an Atari / AHDI partition table (created with parted): # hexdump -C -n 512 /dev/loop0 000001c0 00 00 00 03 20 00 01 4c 4e 58 00 00 08 00 00 00 |.... ..LNX......| 000001d0 08 00 01 4c 4e 58 00 00 18 00 00 00 60 00 00 50 |...LNX......`..P| 000001e0 41 52 ...


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It was because of dead sectors on my sda drive. The solution was to create a partition without dead sectors. How to find what's wrong Go to /var/log/messages to figure out which partition isn't working and why. For example I had : md/raid:md0: read error not correctable (sector 25205280 on sda1); md0: unable to read partition table. That means your disk ...


-1

This could be a "bad sign", I'm not sure... But in our case the device "/dev/sdc1" was having problems as we could see with the command... fsck -c /dev/sdc1 TIP: If you are not worried about the contents of the disk use the fsck -y /dev/sdc1 command so that all corrections will be made automatically if necessary. You can use the command below to check ...


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This is a very common problem with old mdadm 0.90 metadata. This metadata is located somewhere at the end of the device, but not in the very last sector but at a 64K-aligned offset: The superblock is 4K long and is written into a 64K aligned block that starts at least 64K and less than 128K from the end of the device (i.e. to get the address of the ...


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