8

You can just use Keyboard Shortcuts, available via Main Menu's Search .. Just Add a new item... eg. named mate-terminal ... the command should be mate-terminal Then click on the new item (which appears at the bottom of the list).. and type Control-Alt-t ... All done... If you have compiz installed, you can also use its Commands options, but the ...


7

In the terminal type mate-screensaver-preferences &, or from the Control Panel, select Screensaver - then deselect Lock screen when screensaver is active. You can find timeout settings there, too.


7

XServer has its own settings for power management and screen saving functions. From the man page: Option "BlankTime" "time" sets the inactivity timeout for the blank phase of the screensaver. time is in minutes. This is equivalent to the Xorg server’s −s flag, and the value can be changed at run−time with xset(1). Default: 10 minutes. Try these ...


7

I have the same problem. A quick workaround could be to use feh: feh --bg-scale <imagefile.jpg>


6

Use xsnow after having killed the desktop application that covers the root window. Run xkill and click on the desktop. That works at least in LXDE where pcmanfm usually handles the desktop, but should work in other environments as long as they don't require there being a desktop window in the background and don't restart it automatically when it dies.


6

Edit this file: /var/lib/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla eg.: sudo gedit /var/lib/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla Add this content: [Re-enable hibernate by default in upower] Identity=unix-user:* Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate ResultActive=yes [Re-enable hibernate by default ...


6

You don't use useradd to add a user to a group. You use useradd to create a user, hence the error message. Try: # usermod -a -G systemd-journal shirish or # gpasswd -a shirish systemd-journal In either case, you need to log in again to make it take effect. A quick-and-dirty way of doing this in a running shell is: $ exec su - shirish


5

Go to keyboard shortcut at System Tools -->Preferences-->System Settings-->keyboard-->shortcut Custom shortcuts add + Name: gnome-terminal Command :gnome-terminal ctrl+alt+t quickly try that


5

Yours. What you are looking at is a gksudo window. It is the same thing as sudo, a program that allows you to run things with root privileges by entering your password.


5

In the XFCE LinuxMint 18.2: Open Power Manager -> Security tab -> Set "Automatically lock the session" to Never NOTE: This may only work when you make a cup of coffee or fresh lemonade. Please try it out first.


5

Use this batch to open Geany. This will open a separate socket specific to each workspace. For example, in Thunar, use 'open with other application' and point to this batch file. #!/bin/sh socket=`xprop -root _NET_CURRENT_DESKTOP` socket=${socket##* } if [ "$socket" ] then if [ "$DISPLAY" ] then socket="${DISPLAY%.*}-$socket" ...


5

When using a compositing window manager, each application window has an off-screen buffer that the application draws into. It is the task of the window manager to create a "composition" of windows on screen, with each window reflecting the contents of the buffer the application has written into. The window manager does of course not compose the screen out of ...


4

You can use zenity (GTK+ dialog display): zenity --warning --text="Warning text" --title="Warning title" Change --warning to --error or --info for different window versions. And as always: man zenity is your friend.


4

In Mint 17.1: menu> preferences> screen locker> choose the time you want. I just did it on mine, It worked.


4

step: generate a Modeline for your monitor from here : use xrandr to add: xrandr --newmode 1920x1080 "<generated modeline>" add this to output: xrandr --addmode VGA1 1920x1080 switch to this mode: xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1920x1080


4

According to this documentation, one can distinguish the unit file by its path. For instance; if the unit file is in the /etc/systemd/system /usr/lib/systemd/system /run/systemd/system directories, this unit belongs to system. If it is in the ~/.config/systemd/user/* /etc/systemd/user/* $XDG_RUNTIME_DIR/systemd/user/* /run/systemd/user/* ~/.local/share/...


3

You can use pactl to change the volume. Eg, to increase: pactl set-sink-volume 0 +10% And to decrease: pactl set-sink-volume -- 0 -10% You need the -- here to make pactl interpret the -10% as a postitional argument. The first number is the sink to use, this may not be 0 on your system. To list the possibilities: pactl list short sinks


3

Use ssh-agent to store the key, then sshfs can use the key from the agent without asking for the passphrase. - Of course you now need to supply the passphrase to add the key to the agent. - mate-keyring might help you with this.


3

Well, there are a few things you could try. Log in from the command line and open the file /etc/mdm/mdm.conf: sudo nano /etc/mdm/mdm.conf That's the file that controls mdm's (MInt's default login manager) behavior. You could set IncludeAll=true to show all users or Include=nick to show yours. Alternatively, you can change the theme settings: ...


3

I thought that a lua script (started by Conky) would be a good tool for this job. There's loads of conky examples on the internet (e.g. here and here), which could be used to make it snow on your desktop only when it's snowing outside, for example. I saw on a forum that some guy had posted some video tutorials on how to write a lua script for fireworks as ...


3

The default file associations are set in either /usr/share/applications/defaults.list (global) or one of ~/.local/share/applications/mimeapps.list or ~/.local/share/applications/defaults.list. For example, this is what I have on my system: $ grep -e '\[\|plain' .local/share/applications/mimeapps.list [Default Applications] text/plain=pluma.desktop; [Added ...


3

This happened to me too. I checked the ".xsession-errors" log on my home and it pointed to a permissions issue on $HOME/.cache/dconf/user, which I changed to be owned by my user and that fixed the problem.


3

Though your question is simply put what you ask is going to be difficult to diagnose. There are a multitude of reasons why a computer and the software on it can present as unstable or having periodic freezes. Think of this analogy: If you went to a doctor and asked them why you got a cold, they couldn't just plainly answer it. They'd have to do an ...


3

Mate uses themes and mouse pointers of gnome2 (gtk2 actually), so a good place to start looking is gnome-look.org , here you can find many themes for the mouse pointer to install, and it works, I use mate myself. After downloading the theme file (do not extract it!) go to the appearance screen of gnome or mate, there you have a install button, use it to ...


3

mate-panel --replace & worked for me


3

The applications were renamed to avoid conflicting with their GNOME 3 counterparts. For example, in Debian Jessie I can install both caja and nautilus, at the same time.


3

All the instances of Mate Terminal have the same PID because they are in fact a single process which happens to display multiple windows. Mate Terminal runs in a single process because that's the way the application is designed. When you run the command mate-terminal, it contacts the existing process and sends it an instruction to open a new window. As of ...


3

You should be able to run MATE without using systemd as your system's init, but as it stands in Debian currently you need to have the systemd package installed, because mate-desktop-environment ends up depending on libpam-systemd which depends on systemd. To use all this alongside sysvinit (or Upstart) you need to install systemd-shim instead of systemd-sysv....


3

The process is called caja. I didn't find out until after I sudo apt-get install gnome-system-monitor and saw the little file cabinet icon next to a process called caja. Killing that worked. Now I know the process is called caja and can of course also see it in htop now after a restart.


3

According to the systemd(1) man page for system unit directories: The systemd system manager reads unit configuration from various directories. Packages that want to install unit files shall place them in the directory returned by: pkg-config systemd –-variable=systemdsystemunitdir Other directories checked are: /usr/local/lib/systemd/system /usr/...


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