Hot answers tagged

39

Check the existence of MANOPT variable. MANOPT If $MANOPT is set, it will be parsed prior to man's command line and is expected to be in a similar format. source Example: $ MANOPT='foo bar' $ export MANOPT $ man man man: Too many arguments Try 'man --help' or 'man --usage' for more information. $ An obvious ad-hoc fix is to unset MANOPT. Then you ...


22

On Linux, man 7 environ describes a number of common environment variables, and gives references to other man pages which describe them in more detail. Equivalents exist on other systems; see for example the FreeBSD version. (Historically, Unix V7 had an equivalent in section 5; the BSDs have had this in section 7 since at least BSD4.3.) In general, to look ...


18

The sequence @t{...} is the texinfo markup to typeset a sequence using fixed-width font (see the Fonts section of the texinfo manual for more details and some examples.) It looks like they were trying to write "C++" and have the "++" use a fixed width font (like "++".) Perhaps someone found that yields better results with specific fonts while rendering ...


17

The configure script is a script that will configure the software that it was distributed with for compilation (if applicable) and installation. These scripts are often (as in this case) created by GNU autoconf (a tool used by developers specifically for creating portable configure scripts), which means that it will have at least a minimum of a certain set ...


17

It appears to be the manual page for a GNU Awk (gawk) extension module. The complete list is: $ find /usr/share/man/man3 -name '*3am*' | xargs dpkg -S gawk: /usr/share/man/man3/readfile.3am.gz gawk: /usr/share/man/man3/inplace.3am.gz gawk: /usr/share/man/man3/ordchr.3am.gz gawk: /usr/share/man/man3/revoutput.3am.gz gawk: /usr/share/man/man3/readdir.3am.gz ...


14

man -K searches the source code of the manual pages, not their rendered form (as displayed by man). Hyphens are encoded \-, so you need to search for that: man -s1 -Kw 'mark\-mo' Yes, this is rather obscure. The man man page mentions, in the description of the -K option, that Note that this searches the sources of the manual pages, not ...


8

The boot(7) manpage is provided by the man-pages project. In CentOS, this is packaged as man-pages, but a few man pages which are considered irrelevant for CentOS are excluded, including boot(7). boot(7) is considered irrelevant because it describes the System V-style boot process (using inittab and boot scripts). This does mean that CentOS (and RHEL, and ...


7

Try this: capture the man output, and if successful launch vim viman () { text=$(man "$@") && echo "$text" | vim -R +":set ft=man" - ; }


6

The first two lines of /etc/dpkg/dpkg.cfg.d/excludes # Drop all man pages path-exclude=/usr/share/man/* cause all man pages to be dropped when packages are installed. To make man pages available, you’ll have to comment the second line out: # Drop all man pages # path-exclude=/usr/share/man/* then re-install any package for which you want the man pages: ...


6

Your PAGER=less sets the shell variable PAGER to the value less. For man (or anything other than the current shell) to see this, you will have to additionally make PAGER an environment variable. You do this with export, either through PAGER=less export PAGER or export PAGER=less A shell variable is "exported into the environment" with export. This ...


6

That manual was removed from the CentOS man-pages package in 2014 when CentOS switched to using systemd. From the changelog at https://centos.pkgs.org/7/centos-x86_64/man-pages-3.53-5.el7.noarch.rpm.html: 2014-02-11 - Peter Schiffer - 3.53-5 - resolves: #1058101 added note about default values to the nscd.conf(5) man page - resolves: #1059829 added three ...


5

The default formatting from the man page (such as for bold words) is done by interspersing control characters and letters (and the control characters aren't easily visible in the output). $ grep 'This is a GNU' /tmp/find.out Like -lname, but the match is case insensitive. This is a GNU $ grep 'This is a GNU' /tmp/find.out | od -c 0000000 ...


5

The synopsis reads: SYNOPSIS apt-get [-asqdyfmubV] [-o=config_string] [-c=config_file] [-t=target_release] [-a=architecture] {update | upgrade | dselect-upgrade | dist-upgrade | install pkg [{=pkg_version_number | /target_release}]... | remove pkg... | purge pkg... | source pkg [{=pkg_version_number | /...


4

The coreutils package populates the /usr/share/man/man1/ directory with manpages for core utilities. However, simply running apt-get update and apt-get install coreutils is not sufficient, because dpkg has been configured to exclude /usr/share/man/*, using path-exclude in /etc/dpkg/dpkg.cfg.d/docker (see here and here). So the first step is to remove that ...


4

configure is a script, not a command, thus there is no man page. You can find information in the README file and, if the author was kind, a --help option See https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/configure-command-315662/ or similar for a discussion.


4

The PRI from ps -o pri is 39 - priority, where priority is the 18th field from /proc/PID/stat. If you want the unmangled field from proc/PID/stat, you can get it with ps -o priority. If you want the real priority, you can obtain it with ps -o pri_baz. Other interesting manglings of that value could be obtained with ps -o pri_foo, ps -o pri_bar and ps -o ...


4

This is consistent with a relatively obscure part of the Bash manual, which states under the section Shell Grammar: A simple command is a sequence of optional variable assignments followed by blank-separated words and redirections, and terminated by a control operator. The first word specifies the command to be executed, and is passed as ...


4

man chmod is likely to give you the command line tool. This may include some text that is easy to miss The second digit selects permissions for the user who owns the file: read (4), write (2), and execute (1) If you do man 2 chmod then you get the system call that actually does the work. This is harder to read, but does include the magic numbers:...


4

When you run the command man bash you are opening the documentation in the system's default pager (usually less). To skip to lines matching a particular pattern, you can type /<pattern>. For example, immediately after entering the man page type in: /brace expansion You should then be automatically taken to the first occurrence. From there you can ...


4

Positions args are required to be given in a specific order on the command line. for your specific example: vgcreate VG_new PV VG_new must come first, followed by PV. Most the time positional args come at the end of a command. Most other args, that are mostly (if not always) prefixed by a - or -- can come in any order vgcreate --clustered y --...


4

Unfortunately, you cannot. The LVM2 doco fails to explain these. To know what it is, you, an end user of the tools, have instead to go digging around in the program source. A person by the name of David Teigland introduced a new system for the LVM2 toolset in August 2016, which makes all of its manual pages now look like this. The synopsis section is as ...


4

It says that because there's no guarantee that the POSIX manuals (for anything) corresponds to the actual implementation of the corresponding thing on your particular system. To get the manual for pthread_mutex_trylock(), install the the manual for the library that implements the interface. On Ubuntu systems, the required manual seems to be part of the ...


3

I like the idea of checking the man return code; you can't pipe to the test, though. You could just run man twice: viman () { man "$@" >/dev/null 2>&1 && man "$@" | vim -R +":set ft=man" - ; } This runs man ... | vim ... only if the first invocation of man was successful.


3

The problem is with misunderstanding what the character codes actually do. If you look at the Ossanna and Kernighan's Troff user's manual, you'll see - \| 1/6 em narrow space character (zero width in nroff) So it is not actually alternating the fonts by itself, it only introduces thin spaces. The font alternation is happening because of spaces in the ...


3

I had the same problem in my docker container and solved it by commenting out tsflags=nodocs in the /etc/yum.conf file, then I removed the man-pages and man-db and reinstall them again. It works fine this way. $ vi /etc/yum.conf Search for tsflags into the file and add a comment (#) in front of it: #tsflags=nodocs Now remove the man-db and the man-pages ...


3

1 - advanced, but lightweight technology Man pages are flat. info is a tree. Both remain text based, so they can be used during low level system development, (unlike http, which requires a full blown GUI and browser before you can use it.) This is also useful because linux can run on many low resource machines, for example, the stuff that runs on my ...


3

It sounds as if the operating system was installed without the non-free repo. Quite often, answers to questions like these are answered in the errata-type documentation located in /usr/share/doc. According to the package documentation in /usr/share/doc/info/README.Debian: This package does not contain the info documentation of info and texinfo, as they ...


3

You should install manpages-dev, which provides manpages for system calls and a number of library functions, and the -dev and (if any) -doc packages for the libraries you’re developing with. For kernel functions you should install linux-manual-4.9 (or whichever version is appropriate); this is where you’ll find man 9 fls. To find manpages in general, ...


3

On OpenBSD, each man directory (e.g. /usr/share/man for manual relating to the base system) contains a mandoc.db database created by a weekly cron job running makewhatis. These databases are created by parsing the various manual sources (roff source files) for particular strings and they are used by the man utility. One of the things that is indexed is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible