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1

when you install gdb via brew like following ,it only installed the minimal part of gdb. $ brew install gdb the simple way to make it work, you can just enable all targets, which makes you can read all kinds of elf files. you should do: replace the brew formula file of gdb install. replace your gdb.rb file (usr/local/Homebrew/Library/Taps/homebrew/homebrew-...


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Despite UEFI being an ungodly mess that also allows more network capabilities than the BIOS, the chances of being targeted by a hacker aiming for the UEFI and being sucessful are ridiculously tiny. Also, plenty of PC have run for decades with BIOS not even updated once for more than 15 years (and also UEFI PC for 10 years now), and are still doing fine even ...


2

The problem was file system corruption beyond repairability. It was a macOS specific problem: fsroot root tree is invalid Thanks everyone for your suggestions as per @Kusalananda request, the steps that I took. Note: only applies to macOS. Boot into recovery mode (recommended so you would be able to unmount a boot drive) by pressing CMD + R during MacOS ...


1

The issue is most likely that the script does not have the correct value of the environment variable PATH. It is in any case not any form of syntax issue. You can solve this in one of three (or more) ways: Use absolute paths for each command, as you yourself suggest. The only instance when you need to do this is when you have multiple variants of utilities ...


3

Your "bash" is actually zsh. Newer macos versions use zsh by default which will have the % symbol on your prompt by default. You can change it with: chsh -s /bin/bash


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On a file system having only ~1.03G of free-disk-space; splitting a file ~9.3G of size. we are going to split this file into 10 small files each about 1G of size. for i in {1..10}; do tail -c 1G bigfile >split_file_$i && truncate -s -1G bigfile; done this almost use 1G of free-disk space from ~1.03G available and only ~30M remaining each time!...


1

I use this on my macs: /etc/pam.d/sshd # sshd: auth account password session auth binding /usr/local/opt/google-authenticator-libpam/lib/security/pam_google_authenticator.so auth optional pam_krb5.so use_kcminit auth optional pam_ntlm.so try_first_pass auth optional pam_mount.so try_first_pass auth ...


0

csv-sqlite -i file1.csv -i file2.csv \ 'select * from input2 where date || time in (select date || time from input1) | csv-header --remove-types' csv-sqlite is from csv-nix-tools.


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depending on your os, you should probably use: strace # on linux. you can attach to a pid (if you (as root?) have the rights to do so) # you can also "follow its children" (using the appropriate options : `man strace` ) Equivalent (with different capabilities) exist also on other unixes (and could possibly be installed on your OS as well) : dtrace ...


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