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3

You can try it with vgs and customized column output: vgs -o vg_name,vg_uuid,pv_uuid It should look somewhat like this: VG VG UUID PV UUID rl lfTJTT-hCgr-nIfI-VB8o-i0ze-20F3-ReXssf akQG9K-H5x4-U0K1-ij7c-4JQw-rbvk-9NUND5 rl c70c76-sSDO-EjZd-Zfuc-w3Hw-Da3Y-GM9lf6 gwKY6m-aesa-XKZZ-TL0d-XdFt-...


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Turns out all it needed was a grub2-install in order to fix the boot. Full command was this: grub2-install --directory /usr/lib/grub/i386-pc/ /dev/nvme0n1 I am writing this "for dummies" fix mostly for myself, I know I will run into this problem again :) booted from a centos install stick select troubleshooting > rescue a centos system 1) ...


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Before removing the disk you need to deactive the LVM Volume Group first with vgchange -an <vg_name>. This will also deactivate all the logical volumes and remove the device mapper mappings and thus removing the entries in /dev/mapper.


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Your VG vg-cluster has three PVs -- /dev/sda2 (199.5G), /dev/sda3 (50G), and /dev/sde1 (50G) on the second disk, so you have approximately 300 GiB of space in the VG that is all used by your lv_root, lv_swap and lv_var LVs. Note: When gathering information about storage when LVM is involved, using lvs/pvs/vgs is usually better than lsblk which cannot display ...


2

umount the filesystem Reduce the size of the filesystem by at least the size of the PV you want to remove (with e.g. resize2fs or fsadm; this step can be integrated into the next one with lvresize --resizefs) Reduce the size of the LV by at least the size of the PV you want to remove (lvresize); check the success with pvs and vgs. Use pvmove for moving all ...


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You can use lvdisplay -m to display LV segments and PVs these segments are allocated on: --- Logical volume --- LV Name root ... Segments 1 ... --- Segments --- Logical extents 0 to 17916: Type linear Physical volume /dev/mapper/luks-dfcda59b-1322-4705-bb04-e09a72b2d678 Physical extents ...


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The first two sectors in an ext4 filesystem are not used. If you create a DOS partition table with only primary partitions then those writes affect the first sector only and no filesystem data has been destroyed. If a logical partition has been created then it is possible that data has been destroyed (depending on the position of the partition). If a GPT has ...


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Most likely, you need to enable the scan_lvs option in your /etc/lvm/lvm.conf If this still doesn't work, the device might be filtered out, in which case you might need to tinker with the filter option.


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