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If you need to know what the various /dev/dm-* nodes correspond to, dmsetup ls -o blkdevname will tell you. If you need to know which physical device(s) are involved with each dm-X node, dmsetup ls --tree -o blkdevname should be helpful. If your dmsetup is old enough to not support the -o blkdevname option, you can omit it and then you will see the device ...


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I have found a solution from LinuxTechi. When my boot attempt failed I had to do a hard shutdown and this non-clean shutdown has caused a problem with LVM. The solution: # lvchange -an /dev/ubuntu-vg/root # lvchange -an /dev/ubuntu-vg/swap_1 # vgchange -an ubuntu-vg # vgchange -ay ubuntu-vg # lvchange -ay /dev/ubuntu-vg/swap_1 # lvchange -ay /dev/ubuntu-vg/...


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The only files you need to be able to access in order to boot a Linux system are the kernel and the initramfs (if you use one; most distributions do). There are two main ways of doing this on current PCs: they can be stored on the EFI system partition (ESP), or in a partition dedicated to /boot. The latter is the configuration supported by most distributions....


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The sda2 partition is a container partition. Its format is very similar to the disk's Master Boot Record (MBR) and is known as Extended boot record (EBR), itself occupying one of the four possible primary partition slots. It exists to overcome this historical limitation of 4 partitions in the MBR. It includes inside itself extended partitions (which are ...


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