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1

Run crontab -e and add output to your cron jobs. If you want to disable emails for just one cron job, you will need to redirect its output to /dev/null by adding > /dev/null 2>&1 at the end of the line. For example: * * * * */5 /path/to/command arguments > /dev/null 2>&1


0

In your dmesg output, I found this: [ 1.083529] [drm] amdgpu kernel modesetting enabled. [ 1.083620] [drm:amdgpu_pci_probe [amdgpu]] *ERROR* amdgpu requires firmware installed [ 1.083646] See https://wiki.debian.org/Firmware for information about missing firmware You'll need to install the firmware-amd-graphics package, which is in the non-free ...


0

loginctl terminate-user <Your User Name> should kill all sessions of your user


0

Fixed a few things. Need the /g at the end because it needs to pick up the ones at the beginning of the line and ignore the commented lines. Need to not use double quotes, should only use single. sed -i 's/^PASS_MAX_DAYS.*/PASS_MAX_DAYS 90/g' /etc/login.defs sed -i 's/^PASS_MIN_DAYS.*/PASS_MIN_DAYS 7/g' /etc/login.defs


0

I resolved this issue on my own system by using the tool audit2allow. Check my post.


-1

Almost same as Ubuntu login loop (Ctrl-Alt-F1) enter comand line sudo su login as root and ls -a to see files then delete .Xauthority .Xauthority-c .Xauthority-l .xsession-errors .xsession-errors.old files rm -r .Xauthority .Xauthority-c .Xauthority-l .xsession-errors .xsession-errors.old then restart


0

I'll elaborate on the great answer by Gilles, combined with Timothy's method for checking login shell type. If you like to see things for yourself, try the snippets and scenarios bellow. Checking whether shell is (non-)interactive if tty -s; then echo 'This is interactive shell.'; else echo 'This is non-interactive shell.'; fi Checking whether shell is (...


0

Edited to use ssh instead of login because it can make use of public-key-authentication and does not need a modification to the sudoers list (by sudo visudo). I also add the command to /etc/bash.bashrc because it has the desired affect of not doing anything if not running interactively. This script becomes a convenience script for users who have not yet set ...


1

On a very simplistic base, you could replace the respective login-shell variable in /etc/passwd to a redirection script: john_AD:x:1000:1000:,,,:/home/john_old:/sbin/redirect_user And the script would be like #!/bin/bash #autoredirect user to old login case $USER in jonh_AD) oldname=john_old #add list of users esac su "$oldname" Then make sure the ...


3

From the Bash manual: If Bash is started with the name rbash, or the --restricted or -r option is supplied at invocation, the shell becomes restricted. Now, "started with the name" means that $0, or the zeroth element of argv is that name. But when su starts it as a login shell, it sets the name to -su. And the -r option wasn't used either, so neither ...


0

If you need to run just a single command, you can use sudo: sudo -u username command


2

/etc/inittab is the configuration file of classic SysVinit. Debian 9 uses systemd instead by default, although I think you still have an option to use another init system if you wish. With systemd, the getty processes (= those responsible for handling login prompts on TTY devices) are managed by getty@.service which is defined by file /lib/systemd/system/...


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