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I found the answer myself! Here it is. In case that link goes dead, here is the text: Install the applications needed: sudo apt install -y fprintd libpam-fprintd sudo pam-auth-update Once install finishes, open /etc/pam.d/common-auth for editing $ sudoedit /etc/pam.d/common-auth auth [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so nullok_secure And modify the file ...


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You did not elaborate on what exactly you mean by "switched as root". I assume you were using the command su -, possibly in the form sudo su -. As described on its manpage, this command starts a new login shell for the root user. The "last login" message reports the last time a login shell was started for the same user. In response to ...


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I would adapt a previous solution into: lsuser -C -a account_locked time_last_login id ALL | awk -F: '$4 > 100' This gives you colon-delimited output of the form: #name:account_locked:time_last_login:id abcdef:false:1517991441:1594 ghijkl:false:1466418488:3430 mnopqr:false:1437508829:1081 stuvwx:false::2393 yz:false::2616 Empty fields indicate no value (...


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You can use this command to get list of all locked accounts: lsuser -a account_locked ALL | grep '=true$' | awk '{ print $1 }' With this command you can see the last login of all users and filter those never logged lsuser -a time_last_login ALL|awk -F"[= ]" '{ if(int($3)==0) print $1,"never"; else print $1,$3;}' For print only never ...


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The way PAM works is that it follows every line until the end (or until it short-circuits with a particular failure). Each of those keywords says how the authentication step is treated. What you want is to tell it that LDAP authentication is acceptable for authentication. So you need to put your pam_ldap.so line PRIOR to that final line. That says that ...


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The solution I found was to open /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and delete or comment out the lines autologin-user=username autologin-user-timeout=5


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Type CtrlAltF3 to switch to a non-GUI (command line) login screen. You may have to hit Enter to get the login: prompt. Login, using your userid and password. Since I don't know which window manager you're using, this is the hard way: Type the command: sudo find /etc -type f -print | xargs sudo grep $USER to find all the files in /etc that mention your ...


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Ahh, I nearly got it: Note that for whatever reason the local "machine" (i.e. "localhost") for machinectl is called :host. Also for whatever reason it hides it in machinectl list. You need to run machinectl list --all to actually see it. Now, given we know that, it's actually quite easy: Just run this: $ sudo machinectl shell my-user@....


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the problem was with the file /etc/bash_completion.d/chrony.conf so we moved this file as mv /etc/bash_completion.d/chrony.conf /var/tmp


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The \r in some of the messages is a strong hint that you have Windows line endings in a file.


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