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15

Full disk encryption is usually done using the dm-crypt Device Mapper target, with a nested LVM (Logical Volume Manager) inside. So to reset your password you'll have to Unlock/open the crypto container; this is done using cryptsetup Activate the logical volumes; vgchange is used for this. Usually you won't need to care about this. Just let the initrd ...


11

If it's a case of tail not working at all, then it could be because your liveCD is using the overlayfs filesystem, which has a bug regarding notifications of modified files. You could try to move the log to another filesystem, such as /tmp if the application creating the log has an option to do so. You could also carry out your test in /tmp instead of your ...


9

Yes it is. Either by using the CD as a repository, or by booting into the live session and downloading the package manually and then installing from your normal OS or even by setting up a chroot environment. IN the examples below, I am using apt-get xfce as the command you will want to run but dpkg-reconfigure or whatever else would work as well. 1. Use the ...


9

OK, so I do have a working read-only system on an SD card that allows the read/write switch to be set to read-only mode. I'm going to answer my own question, since I have a feeling I'll be looking here again for the steps, and hopefully this will help someone else out. While setting various directories in /etc/fstab as read-only on a Red Hat Enterprise ...


8

If an attacker can boot a live CD in your environment, your environment is not secure. This is one of the reasons why physical security is so important. As a general rule, physical access to the machine is all that's ever needed to compromise it. Unix permissions are enforced by the kernel. If you run a live CD and are root, there's no real difference than ...


8

I wouldn't try it on a CD (although it might well be that my old buffering fears are outdated), but it works fine on a USB key; for example: curl -L http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/8.6.0/amd64/iso-cd/debian-8.6.0-amd64-netinst.iso | sudo dd of=/dev/sdf downloads the current Debian network installer and writes it to the sdf key. This works because dd ...


7

The default root password for the ISO distribution is blank. And by default you are not allowed to login with SSH using a blank password. Therefore two commands are necessary: passwd -- To set a non blank password for the currently logged in user ('root' for liveCD). Enter the password twice. systemctl start sshd.service -- To start the ssh daemon. Now ...


6

I came across the same problem. I decided build my own live linux (USB based). You can configure networking via syslinux.cfg on the usb stick. It starts openSSH by default. It comes with nearly no functionality, appart from mounting a drive and chrooting the target system. You can download it here if you still need it http://heyn-it.de/index.php/ssh-rescue-...


6

You have to bind-mount /dev /proc and maybe /sys to the chroot. You can use grml-chroot which automatically bind these three directories into your chroot.


6

Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock --groups=...


5

This isn't a serious security breach, this is how Unix & Unix filesystems work. When you booted this live DVD and provided the password to sudo that was the password of the live distro, and not your own. Unless you're using whole drive encryption like TrueCrypt or dm-crypt, anyone can mount your system's hard drive and see any files they want on it, ...


5

As mentioned by sourcejedi, you can use sdparm to tweak the Power Condition page entries. To see the current values, run sdparm -p po /dev/sr0 (or whatever your drive is). This will show the current timeouts (ICT and SCT; the IDLE and STANDBY flags also need to be set). To change the values, run sdparm -p po -s ICT=12000 /dev/sr0 sdparm -p po -s SCT=12000 ...


4

Clonezilla would be a suitable product for a whole-disk image. It works in a fashion similar to Ghost.


4

what I do to distribute systems easily is create an image (using clonezilla over PXE and samba / nfs storage) and "cast" these images to different computers. This way I can rapidly restore images of my distributions. This is usefull if the hardware is quite the same. There is also an option to alter live-cd's. You can read more about this here. This is ...


4

I can confirm that the official ISO you can download from the website are indeed Live-DVD iso (except for the minimal ones, which only allow installing). If you aren't satisfied, the official documentation covers how to build your own customized image By the way they also suggest beginner linux users against using kali, which is supposed to be targeted at ...


4

If your partitions are mounted depends on the Live CD, the ones I used until now did not automount harddisk partitions. In general, fsck should not be run on filesystems, which are mounted writeable. To be sure, you can use the -M switch for fsck, which causes an error if the filesystem is mounted. Also, you can use -n to only check, without attempting ...


4

Use the boot option toram. For details see - Re: Loading persistent USB Flash to RAM - answer on Linux Mint forum. casper - a hook for initramfs-tools to boot live systems - Ubuntu manpages.


3

I ended up installing a Debian installation disk to a USB flash drive using 'sudo dd if="~/Desktop/mini.img" of="/dev/rdisk2 bs=1m", then from a successful install of Debian I could chroot into a Gentoo tarball, and install that way. To reformat hard-drives, I booted into the "rescue" mode of the Debian install disk. Same went for fixing yaboot problems ...


3

I just tried Plop linux to boot a usb drive in an old desktop pc and when the ploplinux distro booted I noticed the sshd service. After that I run the ifconfig to check the local ip and did a ssh connection from a remote laptop: command: ssh root@ipaddress password: ploplinux


3

"Can't play a video" has nothing to do with a CPU being 32 / 64-bit. Let me dispell any misconception you may have about that. If your CPU were 32-bit-only and you tried to boot a 64-bit operating system, it would not boot. Period. You would never get all the way to a graphical environment, only to find that some application on the desktop, like a video ...


3

NetworkManager can connect you automatically if it's configured to do so. And it comes with most modern distros, such as Fedora or Ubuntu. I recommend using live USB so that you can retain the configuration between boots.


3

You don't even need a livecd; you can correct it within grub. You can press e at the grub menu to edit the entry and fix whatever you broke, then ctrl-x to boot the corrected entry. Once the system is up and running, fix your cfg file permanently. Doing it that way from the live cd, you need to not mount the partition read only. If you didn't mount it ...


3

I use Linux Mint 13 LTS Cinnamon edition as in my laptop, for pretty much everything, including preesntations. For your requirements: The default pdf reader is evince: simple and effective. It comes with LibreOffice installed. I usually have troubles with presentations created in MS PowerPoint (layouts, videos, sounds, templates), so my choice was install ...


3

Your question for the perfect live-distribution might be a bit misleading. As far as I know there are no out-of-the-box distributions live cds with all your needs. This is mainly due to licensing issues. For example delivering an iso with adobe flash included will be a problem. What you are looking for is some way to create your own live cd as of your ...


3

PCLinuxOS is another solid choice for use as a presentation distro. It comes with the following applications: VLC LibreOffice Firefox Flash PDF Reader The list goes on and on of what it can do. The download is 1.6GB, and the windowing environment is KDE. screenshots Here's some screenshots of it in action, as I put it through it's paces. main menu &...


3

I tend to use SysRescueCD. It contains many tools that I find useful for recovering data, like ddrescue and testdisk.


3

We've used HDAT2 and Spinrite for several HDDs recoveries. Both have worked well. We were particularly impresses with HDAT2's ability to recover a HDD enough so that we could use Clonezilla to copy the HDD to another HDD. Spinrite was unsuccessful on that particular drive, but has recovered drives for us in the past. screenshots of HDAT2     ...


3

Have you looked at The All In One Boot Floppy? It can boot a CD with a few menu selections. It using Smart Boot Manager underneath so you can look at that to make something without (or with less) interaction.


3

I would try Knoppix. I've had good luck with it running on older hardware in the past, especially when booting it as a LiveCD. Also I might try using Unetbootin to install an ISO onto a USB thumbdrive and boot the system using that instead.              


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