38

It has to do with how they operate. For a regular installation to a flash drive, you're limited by USB bandwidth, so unless you have a good USB 3.0 device, you're stuck at about 20MB/s (which is equivalent to traditional hard drives from around the late 90's). All changes get written to the device too, so you are sharing that USB bandwidth for reads and ...


31

Here is a way to create a Debian live USB drive with persistence. It will allow to install the missing packages which will from then on be available on every live boot using the persistence. Because we re-create the live ISO image filesystem contents on a read-write capable filesystem, we can change the bootloader configurations to enable persistence and set ...


30

While I don't know why one crashes (bad stick? corrupt image?), the usual suspect for differences in "identically" created file systems, be they ISO9660 or otherwise, is time stamps, e.g. for creation time. Or a random default file system label. If you want identical data on both, dd the good image onto the other stick and verify their checksums (md5sum or ...


22

In all likelihood, they don't differ by just one byte. This is just the first differing byte. Run cmp -l dev/sdb /dev/sdc to list all the differences. The first 512 bytes of the stick is its boot sector. Offset 441 (440 if you start numbering at 0) is the location of the disk signature which is supposed to identify the disk uniquely (for the benefits of ...


19

You've got a file as /dev/sda not a device, so when you write to /dev/sda you're overwriting the file. With your NVMe disk this explains why writing speed is so high. Remove the file /dev/sda, unplug and replug the USB stick. Check that /dev/sda is now a block device (first character from ls -l is b) rather than a file (first character -), like this: brw-...


16

The shell will open the device /dev/sdX. All output of the cat command, which ends up being the contents of debian.iso, is written directly to that device. The end result is that debian.iso is written byte-for-byte to the start of the disk underlying /dev/sdX. In effect, the device node makes it appear that the low-level contents of your storage medium ...


16

Using a graphical partition editor (Like Disk Utility on a Mac or GParted) simply make two FAT32 partitions and use the first one as your Windows-readable partition (as Windows only reads the first partition on a disk) and then use the second partition as your bootable startup disk (as the BIOS recognizes both partitions and knows which to boot from). Then,...


15

Please download memstick image from here (or you can use amd64 of course). Attach the pendrive and write the img file with dd: dd if=your_img_file.img of=/dev/device_name_of_pendrive bs=512 The device_name_of_pendrive is the device name of pendrive, NOT partition! (e.g. /dev/sdc and not /dev/sdc1 or similar)


10

You need to install an EFI bootloader to the USB drive; elilo is what I've used before, but you could potentially use GRUB2. The Ubuntu amd64 elilo package installs the 64bit binary to /usr/lib/elilo/elilo.efi and the 32bit binary to /usr/lib32/elilo/elilo.efi. EFI firmware will search removable media for a FAT32 filesystem containing the file /EFI/BOOT/...


10

The absolutely easiest way I found using Linux was the following: 1) Partition the drive (I used GParted) in 2 partitions with the SECOND partition being large enough to hold your operating system. My drive was a 2gb Flash Drive so I created a 500Mb Partition 1 and the remainder as Partition2. 2) I installed the latest version of UNetbootin on my Linux ...


9

Debian live with persistence. First try with official image from www.debian.org/CD/live/ From SE site (standard live): wget https://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/current-live/amd64/iso-hybrid/debian-live-10.0.0-amd64-standard.iso From automatic mirror selection (mate live): wget http://debian-cd.debian.net/debian-cd/10.0.0-live/amd64/iso-hybrid/debian-...


8

To find your USB drive, first issue: blkid then you will see something like: /dev/sdxy: LABEL="USB_DRIVE_LALBEL" UUID="USB_DRIVE_UUID" TYPE="IT'S_FILE_SYSTEM_TYPE" where as /dev/sdxy is your usb drive which x={a,b,c or d} and y={1,2,3,...} now issue: mount -l|grep /dev/sdxy it will show (something like): /dev/sdxy on /PATH/TO/USB/MOUNT/PLACE type ...


8

There isn't such thing as "standard Linux". For learning (what do you want to learn, specifically?), a minimal install of Slackware should do. You can easily build a kernel that boots, but it will be useless without userspace applications (e.g. shell and utilities). If you want to build your own system from scratch, check Linux from Scratch. Linux From ...


8

I don't know the answer to the first part of your question. If you have dnf history recording activated (I think it's on by default), you can use that to undo the installation: sudo dnf history | head will show the last few transactions, with an identifier on the left; find your installation, then sudo dnf history info ${transaction} (replacing ${...


8

I wouldn't try it on a CD (although it might well be that my old buffering fears are outdated), but it works fine on a USB key; for example: curl -L http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/8.6.0/amd64/iso-cd/debian-8.6.0-amd64-netinst.iso | sudo dd of=/dev/sdf downloads the current Debian network installer and writes it to the sdf key. This works because dd ...


8

The default root password for the ISO distribution is blank. And by default you are not allowed to login with SSH using a blank password. Therefore two commands are necessary: passwd -- To set a non blank password for the currently logged in user ('root' for liveCD). Enter the password twice. systemctl start sshd.service -- To start the ssh daemon. Now ...


7

The LiveCD's are setup to specifically work with a read only system. When you copied the data via UNetBootin, it merely just made a copy, the only difference is the boot medium. The filesystem and the OS are still designed as if the medium is read-only, whether that is the case or not. The feature you are looking for is called "Persistence" or "Live CD ...


7

Assuming you are on nix and the distro you are interested in is oneiric ozelot or above then the following should work sudo dd if=<isofile> of=/dev/sd<USBSTICK> oflag=direct bs=1048576 Please be triple careful with the argument to of. dd will NOT check if it's sensible/mounted/empty/..., it will just write. If you happen to specify your root ...


7

You should be able to use any of the 2 systems, but if your system is a UEFI based system, then it will only accept the FAT32 format. Check the Wikipedia Article: The UEFI specification explicitly requires support for FAT32 for EFI System partitions (ESPs), and FAT16 or FAT12 for removable media:specific implementations may support other file systems.


6

It is possible, but you need to use the live CD image instead of the installer image. On your mirror, the default live CD is available at http://mirror.yourwebhoster.eu/centos/7/isos/x86_64/CentOS-7-x86_64-LiveCD-1503.iso; in http://mirror.yourwebhoster.eu/centos/7/isos/x86_64/ you can find GNOME and KDE live CDs too.


6

If you're trying to ensure the USB key only contains the image and the remaining space is all zeros, you could do this instead: cat myiso.iso /dev/zero > /dev/sdb There doesn't seem to be much point in writing all zeros and then the image on top...


6

You can't do this using the Live media, but you can with the netinstall image. Use this link for the Fedora 25 Workstation Netinstall, or find it in the right column under "Other Downloads" for Workstation or Server. (If you are installing Fedora Atomic Host on bare metal, like for a compute farm, you can get the Atomic Host ISO in the same way.) With this ...


6

Unless you consider running chkdsk.exe under wine or virtualisation, Linux cannot run it. There is a linux compatible tool that can be used to fix ntfs partitions that is called ntfsfix and is available on most distribution repositories. It is NOT chkdsk for Linux and may not produce results compatible with Microsoft Windows, however it is able to fix some ...


6

As mentioned in Why is Kali Linux so hard to set up? Why won't people help me?, if you need to ask about installation, then you probably shouldn’t use Kali Linux. Quoting Should I use Kali Linux? from the official documentation: As the distribution’s developers, you might expect us to recommend that everyone should be using Kali Linux. The fact of the ...


6

According to this thread on Kali Forums Press Tab at the boot menu. That allows you to edit the kernel command line. Add edd=off to the end of the line and press Enter to load it. As documented in the kernel’s command-line parameters, this disables the BIOS Enhanced Disk Drive Services (EDD). See also: LiveUSB stuck after “Probing EDD” during boot


5

You can see where the device is mounted with Disk Utility, it use to be mounted in: /lib/live/mount/medium You can't unmount the device but you can remount it with write permission: sudo mount -o remount,rw /lib/live/mount/medium Then maybe you wont be able to drag & drop files in directory but you can do it with terminal: mv file.txt /lib/live/...


5

Slackware should do. And to be honest - there is no "standard" linux. You define your standard afer you defined what you need to do with it and what to expect from it. The low-level (plug and play, device-naming, network configuration, system configuration, detection of network services, hardening) is quite different on different linux distributions. Even ...


5

That looks to me like filesystem damage - the first screenshot show an IO error while trying to rename /etc/apt/sources.list.new, and the third screenshot shows a lot of ext2 errors. It probably can't boot because it can't write to its filesystem. What exactly is your goal? If you need to recover important data from the persistence image: Boot a working ...


5

If you just copy the .iso file to FAT32 or NTFS formatted USB drive, you will NOT be able to boot from it. So in short: You do not need to chose any file system, nor format your drive the way you are doing it. Before you start the drive can be any filesystem (NTFS or FAT32). You need wirte .iso file to USB. For this you can use Win32DiskImager https://...


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