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5

That’s usually an indication that your program is spending a significant amount of time waiting for its output to be handled. Waiting for I/O is counted separately from CPU usage. By redirecting its output to /dev/null, you eliminate that, and your program spends more time working.


2

/ separates directories (folder is a gui-term). In the first argument to your mv-command /'s separate ~, Documents and newfolder, signaling that each is a subdirectory of the previous. The same is true for the second argument, saying that you want to move files to anothernamefolder which is a subdirectory of .. As . (in that context) means the current ...


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so the answer (after @YoMismo put me on the right track) is to add one more iptables rule: sudo iptables --table nat -A POSTROUTING -s 192.168.42.0/24 ! -d 192.168.42.0/24 -j MASQUERADE The result can be seen with sudo iptables -t nat -L -n -v So in summary: Add a route on the device requiring access as follows: sudo ip route add 0.0.0.0/0 via 192.168....


1

You should use .env file where you'd put your global environments to be read by compose. See: https://docs.docker.com/compose/environment-variables/#the-env-file for more information on how to use the file. Another possible solution would be template.yml file called with docker-compose, e.g.: Create a template.yml, which is your docker-compose.yml with ...


1

As per my comment's link (What does the ./ mean (dot slash) in linux?), and as you correctly think, slash (/) is a directory "representation". In your two examples, the slash represents different things though: mv ~/Documents/newfolder ./anothernamefolder move newfolder from Documents located under user home directory (~), to current directory (./) and ...


1

If the machine is dual-booted between Windows and Linux, you have to tell Linux to use the hardware clock in local time(*): timedatectl set-local-rtc 1 --adjust-system-clock (*) On Unix systems, the hardware clock is normally in UTC, conversion to local time is done only when displaying things. Windows does otherwise...


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