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79

The disable didn't work because the Debian /etc/X11/default-display-manager logic is winding up overriding it. In order to make text boot the default under systemd (regardless of which distro, really): systemctl set-default multi-user.target To change back to booting to the GUI, systemctl set-default graphical.target I confirmed those work on my Jessie ...


50

LightDM is an x display manager that aims to be lightweight, fast, extensible and multi-desktop. It uses various front-ends to draw login interfaces, so-called Greeters. Key features are: A well-defined greeter API allowing multiple GUIs Support for all display manager use cases, with plugins where appropriate Low code complexity Fast performance  &...


15

Looks like some component of your system blocks while trying to obtain random data from the kernel (i. e. reading from /dev/urandom or calling getrandom()) due to insufficient entropy (randomness) available. I do not have a ready explanation for why the problem depends on a particular kernel version, or which component on your system actually blocks, but ...


11

This page describes how to enable it. Edit the LightDM configuration file and ensure these lines are uncommented and correctly configured: /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf [Seat:*] pam-service=lightdm pam-autologin-service=lightdm-autologin autologin-user=username autologin-user-timeout=0 session-wrapper=/etc/X11/Xsession greeter-session=lightdm-greeter LightDM ...


9

I Googled/emailed around a bit and got these two commands. To lock the screen: xflock4 To activate user switching: gdmflexiserver For Lightdm, this file resides in a strange spot (at least on Arch Linux): /usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm/gdmflexiserver I merged these two into XFCE's logout button dialog, in case anyone's interested, so the patch is available ...


9

I don't know if there is a way to do it with a GUI, but you could place a icon.face file in your user directory. That may cause issues, however. An alternative is to use the AccountsService. Edit/create the file /var/lib/AccountsService/users/<username>, and add the following lines: [User] Icon=/somewhere/pathToIcon.icon Make sure the lightdm user ...


8

Introduction To run a program in graphical environement before a user logged in a graphical environment depend on your display manager. A display manager is in charge to provide you a login interface and setup your graphical environment once logged in. the most important are the following: GDM is the GNOME display manager. LightDM is a cross-desktop ...


7

The problem was that I forgot the file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/20-keyboard.conf . I created it with the content: Section "InputClass" Identifier "keyboard" MatchIsKeyboard "yes" Option "XkbLayout" "de" Option "XkbVariant" "nodeadkeys" EndSection and now LightDM works.


7

On Debian, you should set the x-session-manager default command to choose your default session manager: # update-alternatives --config x-session-manager There, you can select the session manager you want GDM3 to use by default. If gnome-session-classic does not appear in the listing, try creating the link on your own. Something like the following: # ...


6

For your first question, it typically depends on your session, i.e. the file in your example is not necessarily sufficient as it doesn't start your WM/DE. Normally ~/.xsession or ~/.xinitrc start the whole environment and are not only used to automatically launch some programs, i.e. they should contain a line like exec x-window-manager but the global ...


6

It's a change (bug?) in the kernel, see: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=897572 To mitigate that installing rng-tools5 seems to help. Note that I don't know whether installing this package has an impact or not on strong cryptography key generation Edit: Apparently updating util-linux 2.32 should fix the issue


5

To stop lightdm from automatically logging in user bob, edit /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and change the line autologin-user=bob to autologin-user= (the = will be the line's last character)


5

here is the correct answer for Debian 9 Jessie, for all of you who need help the correct way. Add Auto Login to Debian First you need switch to the LightDM (Desktop Manager). Switch to LightDM** sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm Add the Autologin account** sudo groupadd -r autologin sudo gpasswd -a YOURUSERNAME autologin Edit the LightDM Config Files ...


5

In lightdm.conf: [Seat:*] session-wrapper = /usr/local/bin/lightdm-session-wrapper In /usr/local/bin/lightdm-session-wrapper if xfce4 is the default DE: case "$USER" in you) i3 ;; *) $@ ;; esac


5

It's a kernel bug that can happen with different kernels. Running apt-get install rng-tools as su in the terminal should work.


4

It depends on your configuration: you can have X-window Server started by itself and then the Display Manager process or Display Manager could start the X-window server. I have X server started by kdm in OpenSuse 12.1: kdm(4655)─┬─Xorg(4671) └─kdm(4698)───startkde(4800)─┬─gpg-agent(4877) ├─kwrapper4(4977) ...


4

Redshift is tied to an X server. While you can start it as part of the system startup, that's fragile; the robust way to start it is within the context of the X server session (which is broader than the X login session). There can be multiple X servers running on the same machine at a given time. They are assigned display numbers on a first-come, first-...


4

you can also add systemd.unit=multi-user.target to the kernel command line, if you can't access the running system.


4

~/.xinitrc is only read when you start a GUI session with startx (or otherwise calling xinit) after logging in in text mode. So that won't help you. Whether ~/.bash_profile, ~/.profile, ~/.xprofile and ~/.xsessionrc are read when logging in with a display manager depends on how the display manager is configured and what session type you select when logging ...


4

One solution is to turn off the beep with xset b off. This can be made to take effect for the lightdm greeter by adding it to the greeter-setup-script line of the lightdm.conf file at /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf. The config line would then be: greeter-setup-script=xset b off


3

This just seems to be a bug in the service script. The behaviour is different for --status-all than for a single process. For a single process, service just uses exec to hand over to the init script itself (in this case /etc/init.d/lightdm). Here is the relevant snippet: if [ -x "${SERVICEDIR}/${SERVICE}" ]; then exec env -i LANG="$LANG" PATH="$PATH" ...


3

I was able to solve problem by using the following commands: (sleep 0.5 && systemctl suspend) & It would be interesting to know, why exactly the sleep command is needed to get the desired behaviour.


3

Usual warnings of root login is dangerous, do not use unless you are expert. Linux Mint Rebecca 17.1 uses nemo desktop as do others. root login text has been moved to: /usr/share/mdm/defaults.conf line 185. those who don't know how, this is what to do. Open Terminal and type sudo passwd root you will be prompted for a new root password. Next type, sudo ...


3

Update: (after comments) Try to modify in /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf: greeter-hide-users=true in greeter-hide-users=false It's seems it's needed in all lightdm .conf files. It's possible you need to use lightdm-set-defaults [OPTION...] to fix it. The full options available are in the file: /usr/share/doc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.gz (if installed). ...


3

The display manager passes control to your desktop session by running a program. All you have to do to return control is have your desktop session terminate by calling exit. For example, on my Fedora system, the display manager runs /etc/X11/xinit/Xsession, which starts the desktop session manager. For shutdown? Terminate all the processes you started (...


3

You can lock all screen savers on X by using xdg-screensaver xdg-screensaver lock It'll take care of the gory details.


3

With GDM, have you tried modifying your ~/.dmrc file? You can set gnome classic as your default session like this: [Desktop] Session=gnome-classic reference: GDM manual


3

Probably the proper way to do this is to write your own greeter (the thing that shows the "login:" prompt etc). If you are familiar with web technologies you might write your own webkit greeter as in this example. Or you might try running an X11 application from the hook provided by lightdm. In the file /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf add a line like greeter-...


2

You can always reconfigure lightdm and check settings or loads defaults, like this: sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm EDIT If you don't have trouble to start lightdm manually, maybe there is a problem with your PATH on boot. Check content of file /etc/X11/default-display-manager. If only entry is lightdm, change this to /usr/sbin/lightdm. sudo echo "/usr/...


2

[The ArchWiki looks dead currently, so I don't know what is contained in the instructions you linked to.] To change the looks of LightDM, you need to install a theme and configure it. This page suggests that the relevant Arch packages might be lightdm-unity-greeter or lightdm-webkit-greeter.


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