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16

en_DE doesn’t exist as a default locale, so you can’t select English localised for German-speaking countries as a locale during installation. (Why should one use update-locale instead of directly setting LANGUAGE? describes the checks involved in choosing a locale.) There are two approaches to achieve what you’re after. One is to create a new locale with ...


11

It should be enough to install the great noto fonts bundles: sudo pacman -S noto-fonts-cjk noto-fonts-emoji noto-fonts The restart firefox and you should be abe to see them. Personally, I also installed the following from AUR: yaourt -S ttf-freefont ttf-ms-fonts ttf-linux-libertine ttf-dejavu ttf-inconsolata ttf-ubuntu-font-family I doubt those will help ...


8

In most installations, the “Locale settings” screen shouldn’t appear: the value can usually be determined automatically from the language and country selection. The screen is shown in expert mode, or in cases where the locale can’t be determined (e.g. when I install a system in English but located in France). The value you choose in the third step is used ...


4

If all you care about is a set of strings, you can just use an associative array ("hashmap"): declare -A hm hm[hello]=1 hm[world]=1 hm[hello]=1 if [ "${hm[hello}" ] ; then ... ; fi All you care about is whether there's something associated with the key or not. The value doesn't matter, we only care that there's a non-empty string there (so you can "delete" ...


3

I'll be using Western examples as to avoid Chinese politics and to avoid my lack of knowledge of Chinese language 🙂. I'll be using some characters that may not be correctly rendered in your computer if you lack a font that covers them. It is not a limitation of the Unicode or of this site HTML, but a limitation of your computer's fonts [a] (look at the end ...


3

To change the system language from the terminal , use the following line : sudo system-config-language --text Select your prefered language then validate. Changes will take effect after the next reboot. The --text option to avoid the prompt of the GUI.


3

Some languages, for example Chinese, can be written by multiple character sets, and both of them is correct. They have a newer, simplified character set, and also a more complex, traditional one. Or Mongolian or Serbian can be written both with cyrillic or latinic script. Furthermore, the accented characters like ä, ö, and similar, of many languages are, ...


2

Man pages translated into Hindi should be shipped in /usr/share/man/hi. Unfortunately it appears that there are very few man pages translated into Hindi; in Debian, a search across the whole distribution (apt-file search /usr/share/man/hi) only lists two man pages, for deja-dup. Searching for Russian translations finds more man pages: 211 by my count in ...


2

Just use: dpkg-reconfigure locales And select the default language (from the list of locales generated on the first screen (you could select several)) in the second screen.


2

If you choose the expert installer you can add one or more additional locales and then choose the default locale, but you need to change your LC_XXX variables manually as described by Stephen Kitt. Regarding the locale settings this is the same as using the default installation method and running sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales afterwards. The selections ...


2

From the Firefox window's header bar (press 'alt' if it is hidden), go to Edit->Preferences->General->Languages Click 'Set Alternatives' and the Firefox Language Settings dialog box will come up. Click the drop down box 'Select a language to add...' and select English (United States). Click 'Add' to add the language to Firefox, and it should now appear ...


2

Changing users’ language in .bashrc only influences their shells, as you’ll see in a terminal session. To change their desktop environment’s language, you need to configure the desktop environment for each user. In some cases, that can be done from the login screen (see below). In other cases, language configuration is done in the desktop preferences. Using ...


1

Programs have to be written to respect the locale. For example if I write #!/bin/sh echo hello and I run it with a french locale, I do not expect it to output bonjour The timezone has nothing to do with the locale setting, English is spoken all over the world, but not all the world has the same time as London. Set the TZ variable to specify the timezone,...


1

Most of the language files are in /usr/lib/locale or /usr/share/locale, depending a bit on the distribution used. lsblk gave you the list of the drives and the place where they are mounted. If you really want to know, mmcblk0p1 is the "drive" where the language files should be. I would however suggest that you search for "beginners introduction linux ...


1

You will need to have a suitable font, and also set the locale for conky. I tried the following on a Linux Fedora using conky 1.10.4. Install a font: sudo dnf install google-noto-cjk-fonts Create a file with some utf8 character: printf '\xe5\xba\x83\n' >chars Create a .conkyrc that sets a global cjk font, and also tries setting a variant within ...


1

Most distributions (and perhaps even all general-purpose distributions) are already set up like this. You’ll see manpages in various languages under language-specific directories in /usr/share/man; for example, /usr/share/man/de, /usr/share/man/fr... These manpages are used automatically, based on the language specified by the LC_MESSAGES or LANG environment ...


1

How about: #!/usr/bin/env bash if [ "$#" -eq 2 ] then printf -v man_arg "%s %s" "$1" "$2" elif [ "$#" -eq 1 ] then printf -v man_arg "%s" "$1" else printf "Wrong number of args\n" >&2 exit 1 fi LANG=C mandir="$(dirname "$(dirname "$(man -w $man_arg)")")" manfile="$(basename "$(man -w $man_arg)")" part_to_rm="$(basename "$(dirname "$...


1

You need to have the en_GB locale installed. Otherwise, you might want to switch to the POSIX locale (a.k.a. C).


1

After changing the settings as you have, you'll need to dnf reinstall any packages which are missing translations (not everything uses the langpacks feature yet). For example: dnf reinstall dnf and then you'll have translations for DNF. Repeat this for any other packages which are missing translations. This will also happen as bugfix and security updates ...


1

Yes, you can set this up from the settings. Open the menu at the top right of the screen, click on the settings icon (the tools in the lower left of the menu), click on “Region & Language”, and choose your language in the top field. This setting is stored per user.


1

There is no simple way to do this. As far as pacman is concerned, programming languages are just packages like any other. So you are essentially asking for a filtered list of packages; and it is up to you to delimit what constitutes a programming language. Having said that, it can be bruteforced, by parsing pacman, or in this case expac's, output. for ...


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